Forced to Adhere to State (Georgia) Instructional Framework

Discussion in 'General Education' started by MrTempest, Oct 4, 2017.

  1. MrTempest

    MrTempest Companion

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    Oct 4, 2017

    Ok here is the deal, in Georgia the state DOE issued its instructional framework guidelines. Now our district is adopting it and pushing it into the classrooms. I have attached a link to the guidelines as a reference. The issue is that no one in the social studies department is happy about this. Essentially the admin wants to see no more than 10 minutes of teacher led instruction and the bulk of the time is to be allotted for a student driven work session. This does not mesh well with social studies in high school since there is so much content to cover. It is very hard to serve as a facilitator and ensure that everything is covered adequately and grasped by everyone when you are forced to let go of the reigns to the students.

    I am essentially wanting to hear your input and thoughts on this. From our perspective the teachers are heavily restricted by these guidelines and unable to conduct their classroom in the way we feel would be most effective.

    http://www.gadoe.org/School-Improve...DOE SBC Instructional Framework.July 2016.pdf
     
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  3. Backroads

    Backroads Enthusiast

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    I notice the chart mentioned "time will vary based on instructional focus" which seems it could apply to you.

    I'm the sort to try to make students do most of the work, but some things just lend themselves better to, for lack of a better word, lectures.

    There seems to be a forgetting, in our effort to make everything "student-centered" that even books and those fancy computer programs are still very much information dumps. Yet no one picks on them. Is it really so wrong to just have teacher-directed learning when it's the most appropriate?
     
  4. rpan

    rpan Comrade

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    I believe in teacher discretion. Framework guidelines and just that, guidelines. I don't believe that someone who works outside of a classroom can make policy for every teacher and every group of students. I can say from personal experience that when we first implemented student centred learning through projects, students were actually quite lost, especially the ones who were lower ability and could not adapt to the lack of explicit teaching. They really missed the teacher directed learning. Theres a time and place for all types of teaching. We are better than any search engine, we may not know as much as a search engine, but we can explain things in a way only we know our students understand, we can show them compassion and kindness and that counts for a lot!
     
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  5. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    This is the part that annoys me most with this nonsense. I keep being told that replacing my direct instruction with direct instruction from terrible Youtube videos is somehow an upgrade for my students. It isn't.

    History has been told directly from person to person as long as man has communicated. I'll be the first to admit that some lecturers are bad at what they do but to say the solution is to throw it all out is ridiculous.
     
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  6. Backroads

    Backroads Enthusiast

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    There seems to be this thought that students are automatically interested in all things technology. Watch a YouTube video! Do this computer game!

    I have no qualms with a good video, technology can be an very good thing, but speaking for me and my students, I have to be super careful about the videos I pick. Most of my students don't have the attention span to watch a video, and if it's exciting enough to draw some of their attention, it's too much for those who have sensory processing disorders.

    But, guess what? They can actually listen to the teacher talk for a short yet reasonable time.
     
  7. MrTempest

    MrTempest Companion

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    [QUOTE="
    History has been told directly from person to person as long as man has communicated. I'll be the first to admit that some lecturers are bad at what they do but to say the solution is to throw it all out is ridiculous.[/QUOTE]

    I agree there are defiantly bad lectures and I see this as being a reason for many admin wanting to move away from teachers who use powerpoints too much. But there are ways to incorporate powerpoints in an effective and interesting way the does a solid job presenting content. I hate this broad stroke approach that wants to make sweeping changes and really restricts many teachers from being the best they can be.
     
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  8. rpan

    rpan Comrade

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    This notion of a one size fits all or one size fits most is silly. I've seen students who can sit through a whole hour of chalk and talk because they are following the lesson, they understand exactly what the teacher is explaining and the internal sense of satisfaction and achievement from understanding makes them engaged. I've also seen students who are totally disengaged sitting in front of their laptops because nothing google is telling them makes any sense, or fidgeting through a video because they don't understand what the presenter is saying or just playing around with materials because they don't know what to do with it.
     
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