Finally! A way to raise graduation rates and test scores for children living in poverty.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Tyler B., Sep 27, 2018.

  1. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    Now Chalkbeat has identified more than 20 studies published in the last decade that show how to raise test scores and graduation rates. The overpowering conclusion is that the way to higher achievement in poor kids is through addressing poverty.

    Quote from article: "Chalkbeat identified more than 20studies published in the past decade that examine how increasing family income or benefits, like food stamps and health insurance, affect children’s outcomes in school in the U.S. This research does not simply restate the well-known fact that less affluent children do worse in schools than more affluent ones; the studies try to pin down the effect of providing additional resources to families in poverty."

    When Gates and other billionaires propose harder standards and other unsupported methods of closing the achievement gap, then spend hundreds of millions on their ineffective ideas—they miss the simple answer: address poverty.
     
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  3. ms.irene

    ms.irene Groupie

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    Sep 27, 2018

    The Farmer
    BY W.D. EHRHART
    Each day I go into the fields
    to see what is growing
    and what remains to be done.
    It is always the same thing: nothing
    is growing, everything needs to be done.
    Plow, harrow, disc, water, pray
    till my bones ache and hands rub
    blood-raw with honest labor—
    all that grows is the slow
    intransigent intensity of need.
    I have sown my seed on soil
    guaranteed by poverty to fail.
    But I don’t complain—except
    to passersby who ask me why
    I work such barren earth.
    They would not understand me
    if I stooped to lift a rock
    and hold it like a child, or laughed,
    or told them it is their poverty
    I labor to relieve. For them,
    I complain. A farmer of dreams
    knows how to pretend. A farmer of dreams
    knows what it means to be patient.
    Each day I go into the fields.
     
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  4. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Fanatic

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    Sep 28, 2018

    Low-income families already qualify for SNAP benefits, subsidized housing, and free healthcare. And the students of said families receive free public educations and free and reduced breakfasts and lunches. And now California students no longer have to buy school supplies, essentially.

    They already receive a ton of government benefits.

    I grew up in poverty and my breakfasts and lunches were always provided by the public schools I attended at no cost to my parents. I never once went home hungry.

    I’m confused.
     
  5. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Sep 28, 2018

    Just today there was a story about 4,000 low-income people who lost their insurance coverage in Arkansas. Most people are not getting nearly as many benefits from the government as everyone thinks they are.

    Besides, while these kinds of programs are helpful, they do little to stop the effects of generational poverty. We need programs that support banking in minority communities, encourage job training and education with parents as well as their teens, and promote education for teen parents, and help with down payments for houses. I love the tiny house movement, where people with a low income can purchase a small house, build equity, and then eventually hopefully sell and upgrade to a bigger house. Owning property is a huge step toward ending generational poverty.
     
  6. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Fanatic

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    Gotcha. I actually agree with this.
     
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  7. 3Sons

    3Sons Connoisseur

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    Sep 30, 2018

    And you've done well, no? So you're saying the governmental benefits worked?
     
  8. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Fanatic

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    Yes, I’ve done well. My confusion centered around impoverished kids going home hungry as low-income families often don’t have to pay for their children to eat in public schools. They have to be provided food for breakfast and lunch.

    However, more money should be be allocated toward public education as that only amounts to 3% of federal funding, it seems.

    And according to Politifact, and if you go by 2015 figures, the government spends more than 50% of all federal funding toward Social Security, Medicaid, and Medicare. It already spends a ton on those social programs. Also, the US Gov’t spends more toward healthcare than any other nation in the world.

    https://www.politifact.com/truth-o-...art-federal-spending-circulating-internet-mi/
     
  9. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    This seems like a lot, but if you look at the 2018 tax cuts where 80% of the benefits go to the top 1% of earners, that's 22% of the GDP. Our lawmakers believe giving more money to the rich will motivate them to work harder and result in more economic stimulation and giving more money to the poor will make them lazy.

    It turns out that giving poor kids more support results in higher academic achievement.

    When I worked in a low income school, I had a fourth grader named Jennifer who was always excited when she could stay in a shelter where she could take shower. I wondered what she did for food in the summer months, since she got breakfast and lunch at school. Her family was under so much financial stress, it was hard for her to learn and retain knowledge.
     
  10. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Fanatic

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    I definitely think a slight increase in taxes for increased funding to public schools would result in more positive student outcomes. I especially think it would be beneficial if more schools hired both reading and math specialists, so the students who are grade levels behind can get caught up, as well as implement after-school enrichment programs (like after-school reading programs) for those who don’t have parents to read to them at home.

    In high school, I think there should be mandatory classes like Life Skills (how to buy a home, how to balance your checkbook, how to budget, how to buy a new or used car, how to fill out a job application, how to budget your time in a planner, how to dress appropriately for work, how to interview, etc.) and Financial Math (that covers interest rates — simple and compounded, student loans, home loans, car loans, how to use an Excel sheet, how to write a job resume, how to file your taxes, etc). There is so much opportunity for growth!

    Finally, that little girl’s situation makes my heart ache... I was poor growing up, but I never had to worry about being able to shower or not. My goodness, that sounds awful. I can see how in that instance it would be difficult to learn if you have to worry about where you can shower every night. Maybe schools could offer an after-school daycare program where students can freshen up using the campus facilities? Hm.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2018
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  11. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    Sep 30, 2018

    Indeed. The usual benefits are useful for short-term situations or even just to keep heads above water, but address long-term poverty they do not.

    My grandma once worked with a lady who was apparently just awesome. She worked in the public assistance sector, helping families find resources, and such. She was excellent at her job.

    According to my grandma, she spent her childhood and the first part of her adult life thinking jobs were a vague fairy tale. She knew people worked, of course, but it wasn't a thing in her community. You didn't grow up and get a job. It just wasn't done. It wasn't until she applied for benefits for her own children she realized "Oh, if I look in the right places, there are paths to helping me get out of poverty."

    I just recall being dumbfounded by the idea she wasn't used to people getting jobs.
     
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  12. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Fanatic

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    How is not knowing about applying for a job even a thing? This country is called the Land of Opportunity for a reason and many people the world over try to come to America to be educated and to get a job here. I’m just confused how Americans can not know how to apply to a job when practically every town has places of employment.

    That just seems to defy credulity. It’s just crazy that that can happen in this country.
     
  13. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    I agree with the life skills class as a requirement. However, it could start in elementary or middle school so as to build up a suite of life skills that would help economically fragile families from making bad life choices.
     
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  14. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    It is crazy, but there are some communities where the local culture is so impoverished the idea of work doesn't cross their minds.
     
  15. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    And these micro-cultures can be completely surrounded by one's own culture that you would never notice them if you weren't smack in the face with some of their beliefs. Some of the kids I teach are taught early on that a man is defined by how many women he can get pregnant (and kudos to the guy that has more than one girl pregnant at once). And that the NORMAL way of doing things is to get pregnant as a teen, multiple times, and let Grandma or Auntie raise the young kids. That way you have your kids when the government will give you the most benefits, you can get your body back quicker, and the kids are raised by people with experience. It is gross to have a baby in your 30s, you should be having grandkids at that time. When you're in your 30s you can raise your own grandkids, or your sisters' grandkids.

    I was floored when I learned that these concepts are firmly set in a sub-culture and are actively taught to the children.
     
  16. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Fanatic

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    Wow, that is horrible. Absolutely horrible...
     
  17. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    Oct 3, 2018

    I taught in several low income schools for 15 years and never saw anything like this. I'm thinking this is rare. The struggling families I worked with wanted a good life for their children.
     
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  18. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Viewing pregnancies as status symbols sounds improbable as a cultural norm, unless the culture in question is limited to boys below the age of, say, 25. Subtract the pregnancies, and the view in that age group that sexual conquests are something to boast of seems to span times, locations, races, and socioeconomic statuses.
     
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  19. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    That's refreshing to hear. I am hoping it is rare and isolated to my region. I can't think of any families that did not want a good life for their children. But many families defined a good life as something radically different than I would.
     
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  20. ms.irene

    ms.irene Groupie

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    Out of curiosity, what region are you in?
     
  21. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I live in the south, but in a city. We see generational poverty, gang activity, immigrants from many different countries/cultures and everything else you'd expect to see in a city.
     
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