English Language Learners

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by mstnteacherlady, Jul 13, 2007.

  1. mstnteacherlady

    mstnteacherlady Cohort

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2007
    Messages:
    664
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 13, 2007

    Ok, as I'm planning for the fall, thoughts of the previous Spring continue to run through my head. When I started teaching in Feb., I had 25 students. 2 of these students had been in the class for roughtly two weeks before I got there and neither one of them spoke English. Throughout the rest of the semester, I worked one-on-one with them as much as I could. When I finished a lesson or students were working independently, etc. I would work with them in a small group type situation. By the end of the year, I felt like I had made some progress with the 2 students.
    How should I go about planning for situations such as these for the fall? I have my class list and most of the ELL students are making fantastic progress in our school program. I just want to make sure I prepare really well for next year.
    I guess I just need a little guidance. Help, please?
     
  2.  
  3. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Messages:
    2,468
    Likes Received:
    12

    Jul 13, 2007

    Are you asking about how to teach them the course content or how to teach them English or both at the same time?
    Definitely start off by teaching them words and phrases they need in a school building. Label as many items in the room with English/Student's Native Language signs. Use web-based translation programs so one on one communication. Get them some pull out time with the school's Bilingual/ESL department. Pair them up with a buddy who is interested in helping out. See if anyone else in the building speaks the language and arrange occasional visits. Set up and meet with the child's family to get a feel for what's going on. Is this a long-term move? Do the parents have an interest in English language learning for themselves. Are they aware of the difficulty their child might face. Help them get in touch with a community center that offers ESL to adult learners. Have the counselor sit in the meeting along with the Bilingual/ESL teacher.
    Hope some of this helps. It's what I do. Keep it a positive experience for the student and you'd be surprised how many are speaking English in a short time. They have to if they want to make friends. If you notice any signs of learning difficulty not having to do with language, make sure to address it to the Bilingual/ESL teacher and the counselor.
     
  4. Maestra Ita

    Maestra Ita Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2007
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 13, 2007

    Now I feel like someone can understand me. I live in Puerto Rico and I will be teaching English K3. This is my first year and I want to make it different but it is very difficult because I don't want to speak any Spanish in the classroom. So many ideas here then again is hard because you have to teach in both language. My idea is to speak English as much as I can. Remember if you feel lost, how those kids feel? It's a very difficult situation they are in, I was there also. Try to use your hands when you talk, so they understand the words better. Like Zoe told you show them the words they are going to use the most. Remember they go home to speak Spanish. The way I learned, was trying to describe with hands or other words the word I was trying to say. For an example: Red, You eat, good Oh Apple. Eventually they will learn because they have to. No other choice everybody speak English and like Zoe said they need to have friends. Hope this help you, I am practicing my English, lol.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Y2kdiva,
  2. TrademarkTer
Total: 299 (members: 2, guests: 273, robots: 24)
test