Emergency Lesson Plans

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by JustMe, Aug 10, 2006.

  1. JustMe

    JustMe Guru

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    Aug 10, 2006

    I already have a couple of ideas in mind but I need three solid lesson plans per class in the event of an emergency. These need to be plans that can be done at any stage of the year and of course by a substitute. I teach 6th grade, reading and writing (separately).

    Any ideas? Thanks!
     
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  3. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Aug 10, 2006

    Do you have a basil? When I was doing my ST, my CT had a particular story in the basil that she left as sub plans... one she wouldn't get to during the year but that could esily be covered by a sub. She left writing assignments to go along with it.

    For writing, can you leave prompts to have them write about?
     
  4. teresaglass

    teresaglass Groupie

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    Aug 10, 2006

    Get some sub books and copy lesson plans out of them. Terry G.
     
  5. Alaskanteach

    Alaskanteach Cohort

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    Aug 10, 2006

    I like Round Robins.. first have students get into groups of 4.. each student needs one piece of paper.. review rules about appropriate topics..

    You give a writing prompt..

    each student writes it down, and finishes a paragraph about it.

    Then they rotate papers to the right. A few minutes to read, and a few minutes to build off the idea started on the new page..


    continue until the stories are complete (however many paragraphs you would normally teach about should equal the rotations..)

    then have students read them aloud to the class one at a time.

    they usually are pretty comical..
     
  6. katrinkit

    katrinkit Comrade

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    Aug 11, 2006

    Grab two or three short stories (I call these, Short Stories on a Sub Day). Students read the three stories and then answer questions, such as...
    1. Which did you like the best? Why?
    2. Choose two stories and write two one-paragraph summaries telling Miss xxx what it was about. What was the plot? Was there suspense? Was it predictable? What made it likable?

    My favorite short story is "Conversation Piece" by Ned Guymon - it is one-two word quotations down a page and students have to figure out what happened. So, my third question usually asks about this one (if I use it).
     
  7. katrinkit

    katrinkit Comrade

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    Aug 11, 2006

    I keep posting really long posts, so I thought I would split this up.

    Use these short stories - "The Confidence Man" "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" "The Ransom of Red Chief" and "The Most Dangerous Game." Have the students read one and answer the following questions...
    1. Write a summary of the main character's job/occupation (or imagined occupation)
    2. Do they enjoy their job? Why?
    3. Do you think these men wanted to be in their professions when they were growing up? What made them choose these occupations?
    4. On the back of this sheet, write the main character of your chosen story a letter. In it, please counsel them about their career choice and whether you think it is appropriate or not. Be sure to use at least three solid examples from the story to back up your advice.

    Hope these help! I have some for reading, but I have to get ready for work now.
     
  8. Alaskanteach

    Alaskanteach Cohort

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    Aug 11, 2006

    Oooh! Another good one is an art response day.. pick an illustration that will photocopy well. Put it on an overhead. Then we you are out, the sub will show the art to the students, and they write a response based on color, light/dark use, title of the piece, date it was made, etc.. I often scour books for great thematic art just for this purpose.. some textbooks come with supplemental overheads you can use, too.

    My kids LOVE art response days.
     

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