double digit addition with carrying

Discussion in 'Second Grade' started by Learner4Life, Jan 10, 2008.

  1. Learner4Life

    Learner4Life Cohort

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    Jan 10, 2008

    My 2nd grade Title 1 students are working on double digit addition with carrying and I'm trying to find fun lessons to do with them on this stuff but all I can seem to find is worksheets. We've used the base-ten blocks for those more tactile learners but I want something more. I'm thinking of having them use dominos to make a problem on their desks and we've played tic-tac-toe addition style. What are some lessons you've used to really get the concept through? (I only have them for a 1/2 hour)
     
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  3. Elcsmith

    Elcsmith Companion

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    Jan 10, 2008

    I am also teaching this concept and my kids have nailed it! I'm so proud of them. Here's what I did. I worked on it for about a week. 15-20 minutes whole group then about 10-15 minutes with small groups (per group.) I wrote the problem and we worked it using base ten blocks. I explained that rods cannot go with units and units cannot go with rods. I explained that you change 10 units for a rod. Then we played a game in small groups. two people were counters, one person was a joiner and the other was the trader. The trader is really mean and picky. He will only give you a rod if you give him exactally 10 units. So if the problem was 27+14 one counter counts out 27, the other counts out 14. Then the joiner puts 27 and 14 together and sees if there are enough units to make a trade. If there are they have to ask the trader to PLEASE make a trade.
    The kids begged to play everyday! I hope that makes sense and helps!
     
  4. MollyT

    MollyT Companion

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    Jan 11, 2008

    Elcsmith - what a great idea! I love it. You are so smart to think of this.

    Some kids have trouble getting the trading and giving them each a job is so kewl.

    I will definately be using this idea this year. Thanks!
     
  5. corps2005

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    Jan 11, 2008

    What a neat idea! We are starting this concept next week. It's a great way to involve various levels too! Thank you for posting this!
     
  6. Elcsmith

    Elcsmith Companion

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    Jan 15, 2008

    Just to follow up. I'm so proud EVERY student in my class has mastered this skill! AWESOME FEELING!
     
  7. Learner4Life

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    Jan 16, 2008

    My kids got it too! Each one of them got a 95 or better on their tests (great for title 1 kids)... HOWEVER, we are now on to subtraction and I've never heard more whining in my life!!!
     
  8. buck8teacher

    buck8teacher Devotee

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    Jan 16, 2008

  9. Queen13

    Queen13 New Member

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    Sep 5, 2012

    I have been teaching for a few years.....and this seems to work!
    I explain it to the kids as a semi-detached house...
    I draw this on the board....
    Tens live on one side and ones/units live on the other.
    There can only be 9 living in the ones side....as soon as there are ten I make a bundle of 10....and they go to the tens. I visually draw it and have a door step on the tens, where the NEW tens stand.....
    Kids really relate to this concept BUT it is very visual. And we do heaps of buddling of tens and one before....
    If you'd like to know more....let me know
    Good luck
     
  10. txstar

    txstar New Member

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    Dec 15, 2012

    I found last year that some of my kiddos had a hard time understanding double-digit addition with regrouping when we would "trade" ten ones for a ten. Some had in mind that you were subtracting, or taking away - which isn't that strange of a leap when you actually take away the ten ones and replace them with something different (the tens block). So, I decided to try a different approach. I use beads and cups with a tens/ones chart. They can either have a bead by itself in the ones column, or ten beads in a dixie cup in the tens column. Each cup is one "ten", and of course each bead on its own is one "one". When it came time to regroup, instead of trading in ten "ones" and getting that completely new and different ten block, the kids actually regroup the ten "ones" by picking up those same beads and putting them into a cup, then moving the cup into the "tens" column. I made sure they understood WHY they had to move those beads - we had discussed at length when talking about place value earlier in the year that you can only have one digit in any one place, so this wasn't too hard for them to internalize. Let me just say that this one change in approach made a HUGE difference this year. And it works just as well going the other direction when they work on regrouping in 2-digit subtraction a few weeks later.

    I hope I explained this clearly enough to understand.
     
  11. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Dec 27, 2012

    I also have them write it out is expanded form.
    This works especially well with subtraction.

    143 = 100 + 40 + 3
    274 = 200 + 70 + 4
    300 300 + 110 + 7
    110
    7
    417
     

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