Does my job now limit my future?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by teacherguy111, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. teacherguy111

    teacherguy111 Cohort

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    Jan 14, 2013

    I work in a private christian school now... but I hope to get into a public school district to coach and teach one day. Do you think this will count as valuable experience to a principal of a public school?

    Our christian school has a pretty good reputation in the area and gets good test scores etc.... but I only have 11 kids in my class, compared to much bigger classes in public school classrooms.
     
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  3. Ms.SLS

    Ms.SLS Cohort

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    Jan 14, 2013

    I think any experience is good experience.
     
  4. teacherguy111

    teacherguy111 Cohort

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    That's what I think also but just wondered if public schools would think the same thing.
     
  5. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Jan 14, 2013

    In my area, public schools love hiring people who recently left a private school. Why? Because they have experience, and they start at the bottom of the payscale.
     
  6. mcqxu

    mcqxu Comrade

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    Jan 14, 2013

    I'm sort of in the same boat as you, as I'm licensed in my state but teaching at a Catholic school with a great reputation. While I still look at openings, at this point I'm very particular about which public school districts I'd be willing to go to.

    It really depends on the district. I started interviewing last year and I didn't feel like my experience at a private school was hurting my application. Most of the districts that interviewed me were highly ranked, so I think they liked seeing that I had worked with parents with high expectations. I think it can hurt a little if you're trying to get a job in a more urban school district with more behavior and classroom management issues, but I know another former private school teacher who got a job in an urban district last year, so it does happen.

    You have your own classroom, so you're planning the instruction, which are huge pros in my opinion. Are you able to volunteer at all in a program in a district you are interested in, and are you licensed to teach? In Ohio, a license is pretty important, as I'm sure you know!
     
  7. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Virtuoso

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    You'll be fine. A male teacher who is able to work with elementary and middle school students is a commodity in just about any job market, public or private. It's a shame that Ohio's teacher market is so rough! Keep your eyes out for the Department of Education Job Bank.
     
  8. teacherguy111

    teacherguy111 Cohort

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    mcqxu seems as if you are in a similar situation. I am also going to be kind of picky when it comes to looking for a public school district. I definitely want to be there at some point but I am probably going to try and wait until there is openings in the county. At the moment I live 5 mins from my work and driving all the way to another county would not be something that i want to do......

    I am also close to my babysitter if anything were to go wrong etc.

    catnfiddle - thanks! i keep an eye on there also. not sure when they will start showing up for next year but I do look a few times a week.

    And yes I do have a valid teaching license for the state of Ohio. I keep up with everything I need to do to keep it valid etc.
     
  9. mcqxu

    mcqxu Comrade

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    Jan 15, 2013

    That's good! I've been trying to additional areas to my license and try to attend meetings to keep up with public school issues.

    I would actually really love to teach in an urban district, as long as there was good support with administration. Sort of a scary thing about teaching in public schools in Ohio right now is how much things are changing with teacher evaluations - but I guess this is happening everywhere. At my school we are frequently evaluated and have been videotaping lessons for awhile, but rating teachers based on student academic growth (50% of the evaluation!) is going to be very dependent on the neighborhood in which you are teaching and your administration.
    Read this article, and click on the link "each teacher will be rated" for the evaluation framework:
    http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2013/01/state_standards_for_evaluating.html
     
  10. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Virtuoso

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    Agreed, mcqxu. I'm sorry if I'm hijacking, but the new evaluations for public school teachers are daunting. How will I be evaluated? My students are seniors who have already passed Reading and Writing. Must I rely on the skills of the other teachers who are prepping younger students to take those tests? Does my evaluation get tied to my pass rate? What if one of my fellow teachers rigs his or her pass rate to be much higher than my fairly evaluated one? ACK!
     
  11. KoGs

    KoGs Rookie

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    Jan 18, 2013

    I may get in a lot of trouble for say this but I find it rather unfair that Catholics can teach in a public school but non Catholics are not allowed to teach in a Catholic school. Diddo for Christians.

    Maybe we should demand a "reference letter from a non church member" stating how the prospective teacher does not go to church in order to get a job in the public school system.
     
  12. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Virtuoso

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    Wait, what? I know several non-Catholics, some of whom aren't even Christians, who teach in Catholic schools.
     
  13. KoGs

    KoGs Rookie

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    There are some exceptions of course. I know some myself. But you will never see a requirement for a teaching job being, "must not be Catholic" where as there are teaching positions where it specifically says you must be Catholic.
     
  14. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    If the Catholic-school teacher's duties are going to include teaching Catholic dogma, then it strikes me that advertising for a Catholic isn't out of line.
     
  15. mcqxu

    mcqxu Comrade

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    Jan 19, 2013

    Not sure where you're getting your info from, but the Catholic school where I work employs MANY non-Catholics, including Jewish, Atheists, Non-denominational Christians, etc. However, most parents send their kids to our school because of the family-oriented community and Christ-centered environment, and all students AND teachers, regardless of religion are required to attend mass, and teachers are required to partake in the teaching of the core values of our school.

    If you have fundamentally different religious beliefs, is this really somewhere you'd want to work? If so, apply. If not, why complain about it?

    That being said, I realize there are Catholic schools that require teaching candidates to be Catholic, and I personally don't think there's anything wrong with that. They receive private, not public, funding and have a right and to make that call.
     
  16. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jan 19, 2013

    While many Catholc schools do hire non-Catholics, most expect teacher's to support the church teachings...being a Catholic could probably fall under a BFOQ.
     
  17. bubbles

    bubbles Rookie

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    I know of a teacher who came from a Catholic school and goes to a Baptist church, so I'm going to assume she was not Catholic while working there. That's not to say all schools allow teachers from other denominations, but in my area it seems that several at least do hire believers in other religions. Now whether they would hire an atheist I don't know...
     
  18. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Jan 19, 2013

    I went to catholic school forever and had plenty of non-catholic teachers. You had to have a religious education endorsement of sorts....but they taught religion just like any other curriculum. Of course, you'd obviously feel more passionate about it if you believed it, but it can be done. I am not catholic and I could bust out and teach 6th grade religion right now if you needed me to.

    I don't think MOST schools would require you to be catholic these days. Teaching is teaching.....any experience is good experience.
     
  19. Ellensmom

    Ellensmom Companion

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    Jan 21, 2013

    I teach at a Catholic school and we have several members of our staff who ARE NOT Catholic. While it is true that our pastor prefers someone who IS Catholic to teach our religion classes, he does not require a teacher to be Catholic. One of the pillars of our faith is that we are ONE, which means open and universal. Please be careful in generalizing those of us who are Catholic, or our places of employment by saying we do not allow non-Catholics to teach at "our schools". That is simply not true in all cases. Honestly, I wouldn't want to teach at a Catholic school that only hired Catholics. Talk about shielding our children- how would they learn about other cultures and faiths if they were not exposed to them in the place they spend 8 hours of their day. :2cents:
     
  20. greenbay33

    greenbay33 Rookie

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    Jan 22, 2013

    It's probably different in different areas of the U.S. but even where I am from my Catholic school hired non catholic teachers (including a baptist minister from Australia once), and I live in one of the most conservative diocese's in America. I think you do have to agree with church teachings, for the most part. However, they are tolerant. I know when I was in school we had a single teacher get pregnant, but I think they were okay with it as long as she kept it. So yes I think non Catholics can work in Catholic Schools
     
  21. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Virtuoso

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    Jan 22, 2013

    We're going waaaaay off track here. The original post had nothing to do with trying to get a teaching job at a Catholic school.

    :hijack:
     

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