Does anyone teach Bible?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Koriemo, Aug 12, 2018.

  1. Koriemo

    Koriemo Comrade

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    Aug 12, 2018

    This year, I've switched from teaching English full time to teaching Bible part time. I'm teaching 8th grade and 10th grade.

    I'm struggling SO HARD with this! The curriculum we have for 8th grade is designed to be taught in a youth group type setting. The content is GREAT, but it's designed to be used once a week. I can do two "lessons" per week, but it's a little tricky to space it out correctly. It's also hard to come up with assessments for the course. So much of the curriculum is based on personal experience and discussion. I think that's great and hope it adds to my classroom, but the only assessment I can think of is essays, and I don't want to overdo that. When I taught English, I could find tons of resources and lesson plans... There isn't much for Bible!

    The 10th grade class is a bit easier as there is more concrete information that I'm supposed to cover, but I still have a hard time figuring out how to teach it.

    Just checking to see if anyone has tips!
     
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  3. ms.irene

    ms.irene Groupie

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    Aug 13, 2018

    I used to teach religion at a Catholic school. I had a curriculum that was really a workbook for Confirmation, with a few fun/useful activities. We mostly did prayer intentions ("I would like to pray for Rihanna. I would like to pray for Chris Brown...") (this was mid-2000s!). It wasn't ideal, TBH...sorry if this is not terribly helpful!
     
  4. Joyful!

    Joyful! Habitué

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    Aug 13, 2018

    I have taught Bible on many levels over the years.
    Best advice I can give you is to go online and buy a TE on the levels you are considering. Buy used. Lots of homeschoolers sell online as well. (For example, BJ Press has curriculum for every grade) The reason I suggest that is rather than you looking for resources all over the place, they have a bunch included in the TE. Also, you can pick and choose to match the topics that are in your curriculum.
    Bible memory, reading devotionals, journaling can all expand your current curriculum.
    If I can be of more specific assistance, please don't hesitate to ask. I'm teaching all math this year, so I can live vicariously through you. :)
     
  5. Koriemo

    Koriemo Comrade

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    Aug 14, 2018

    Thank you! I will check out BJ press and see what else is available to supplement. I forgot about homeschool stuff!
     
  6. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Aug 15, 2018

    Another idea might be to just spend time reading and discussing the Bible as a class, perhaps passages relevant to the curriculum's lesson or a book study. Although expensive (but Walmart or other distributers have discounts), for 8th grade I'd recommend the Jeremiah Study Bible, (commentated by Dr. David Jeremiah). They also have a kids' version with cartoon characters teaching the lessons, but it might be too young for 8th grade, definitely too young for higher levels than 8th. The Jeremiah Study Bible contains commentary at the bottom of each page for selected verses, inset discussions on various topics, and a detailed book preview. It is available in hardback which would be ideally sturdy for classroom use. This could be complemented with their magazine Turning Points that contains a daily devotional. Turning Points needs a donation to receive.

    If you have an interactive whiteboard or other classroom-viewable access to the Internet, another possibility would be to view lessons or sermons from the Internet. Thinking from an 8th grader's viewpoint, I might recommend messages from Pastor Sandy Adams. He uses a lot of charts, illustrations, and has a good sense of humor, adding illustrative jokes to his sermons.

    I had a third thought, too. As visiting missionaries become available in your area, perhaps they would be willing to speak to your class.

    Outreach activities are also another possibility. Collecting food for food banks, collecting stamps that some organizations sell to raise money (when my third graders did this, it was difficult to get stamps properly cut out from the envelope since often it wasn't the students but their parents, grandparents, and neighbors who didn't realize that a significant border was needed around the stamp), donating toys at Christmas (who best but kids to know what toys to buy for other kids), collecting used winter wear for distributers, planting flowers around churches or nursing homes, etc.
     
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