Do you share your room?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Caesar753, Jul 2, 2007.

  1. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jul 8, 2007


    forgive me for disagreeing, but I would have a real problem there.

    While I'm in the room teaching, it's my room. I'm not a guest who is observing for a day, I'm a teacher and this is my class. If I'm being observed by my department chair, great. If another teacher wants to observe my class, he or she is free to set something up. But when my class meets, it's my class and I'm the teacher in the room. I don't want anyone else giving me or, worse, the kids I teach, the impression that I'm not capable of controlling my own class.

    When the bell rings, your class is over and mine begins. The room is now mine. If you put your stuff away I won't touch it. If it takes an extra minute or two on occasion, that's fine, and I expect the same courtesy.

    But that room is not yours. It belongs to the district and the taxpayers-- the same ones paying your salary and the salary of the person in "your" room teaching a group of kids. If security is a problem between periods, lock the door and the next teacher can open them up when she gets there.
     
  2. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Jul 8, 2007

    I would absolutely hate sharing a classroom, from both perspectives. I know that the classroom is not mine, but at the same time it is my home away from home. I've spent hours working to make it comfortable and organized, not to mention the money invested. So, while the physical, empty room isn't mine, I've created a room that is.

    I would be very understanding for the sake of the floater, because I would rather be in my position than theirs, but oh, how aggravating it would be.

    I just hope I never have to deal with this!
     
  3. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Jul 8, 2007

    The computer is an issue though, from a planning perspective. It is "unfair" that a teacher cannot fully do his or her job during this time because the room is in use. This is where a laptop would come in handy for sure. When the "primary" teacher has planning s/he could take it and work elsewhere.

    Do most floaters have a laptop on their cart? They are certainly at the greatest disadvantage!
     
  4. EngTeacher15

    EngTeacher15 Companion

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    Jul 8, 2007

    I find this entire thread very interesting. I just spent my first year of teaching as a floater, and for those of you who have never done it, it's TOUGH. I never felt like I had my own space, and it was very difficult to keep student projects, let alone have a system of organizing my materials. I didn't even have a filing cabinet that I could call mine. It definitely affected my teaching, and I can't WAIT to have my own classroom next year.

    Just like the regular classroom's teacher has to go somewhere on his/her prep, we have to go to a random place too (on my prep I was in the English workroom). Often times we have difficulties getting things done on our preps, let alone before or after school. Also, students didn't know where to find us before or after school if they needed help, because it was almost impossible to establish a place where they could find us.

    If you DO have to share your room, be as welcoming and accommodating as you can be to the floater. Try to give the floater teacher some board space and maybe even a cabinet. If you can avoid it, do not stay in the room when the floater teacher is teaching. It is uncomfortable and intimidating. The students wonder why the other teacher is there, and it makes it even worse if the teacher tries to give you advice in front of the students or take over your class. If you're a floater, my only advice is to be flexible and stay organized. Make a joke of it. I told my students that I was going to get rims for the wheels of my cart, and they loved that I was able to make myself. They decorated it and even fought about who could push it down the hall or into the classroom.
     
  5. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    Jul 8, 2007

    Cassie not only have I shared a room but I have done it twice. My first teaching job I was a long term sub in alternative ed, not only did I share a room we both taught in the same room AT THE SAME TIME! It was a large room it used to be the auto body shop (think garage door and a breezy feel!) So when I got my own classroom with my contract position in another district I didn't mind sharing for an hour a day. I just got my lunch and left. Now everything on our computers is saved on the network, so I could save it and log off, and find it all on the next computer I logged onto. But you can bring a flash drive and do your lesson planning that way.....just save it all on them. Staples has a 2G one on sale right now for $19.95 down from $50.

    To make matters interesting with my last classroom sharing, I shared with my principal. He taught one class a day in there.....so of course I let him use whatever he wanted. But it went both ways, I got to use whatever supplies he had in the room. So I had things I couldn't get with the limited budget they got me, like scissors.

    Yes the sharing of a room can be difficult, but I thought of the time at my current school as a chance to get a change of scenery and relax, that time was HUGE for me, I found when I stayed in the room and subbed for him I got more stressed toward my last hour class who were, um a handful to say the least.

    Just remember to make a few agreements about how things will be shared from the beginning, write things out if you have to, and go into it with a postitive attitude and you will find the blessing in the pain.

    Good Luck, and at the least think of it this way , you could both teach in the room at the same time! :D
     
  6. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Jul 8, 2007

    Like I said, I couldn't imagine being a floater. Bless you all! :)
     
  7. Teacheroo

    Teacheroo Companion

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    Jul 9, 2007

    the elementary schools in my area are all on the year-round system and we rotate, meaning every three months we change rooms. Some schools, or teams within schools, choose to rove instead, so that one teacher changes room each month but all the others get their own rooms. This way, you get your own room for 3 years before having to rove. My team elects to do the rotating thing. I'm not excited about it, but I guess I'll make do. We have to pack up our entire room every three months. I guess I'm lucky, in that I can have my 6th graders do a lot of the work. Ugh, How in the world do you prepare for open house and everything??
     
  8. Tookie Williams

    Tookie Williams Rookie

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    Jul 9, 2007

    floating should be based on seniority. If I'm the low man on the totem pole, then I have no problems accepting my role of floating (even though it's less than my ideal) However, I better not be assigned to float if there is someone lower than I.

    I don't agree with the philosophy that it's both teacher's room equally. I know it's taxpayers room but I am assigned that room, the other teacher is assigned to float.

    The room is to be set up like the main teacher wants it and the floater makes their seating charts, etc, around that. If I were to rearrange my classroom setup, I would tell the other teacher, but I wouldn't ask permission. However, they shouldn't get the same option if they are a floater.
     
  9. MsPlace

    MsPlace Rookie

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    Jul 9, 2007

    I have shared my room as both the floater and the home teacher. I really agree with the position that the room is the schools. We are all there for the students.

    In our school, the computers are networked and we do attendance on the computer. This is a requirement. We are also required to have our email accessible. That means the computer needs to be available for the floating teacher.

    I have had a problem with floating teachers allowing students to "trash" my room. I continue to discuss expectations (but not blame). Part of my problems have been that I have the same students as the floater, so the kids are in the same room with both us during different periods. If the expectations are very different, then the students have may have problems with the transition. We, however, are the adults.

    I am floating this year, and not looking forward to it. It will affect my classroom management and how I use my class time. I hope the teachers I am sharing with are flexible.
     
  10. trulyblssd

    trulyblssd Companion

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    Jul 9, 2007

    I did the same thing. My students made me decorations for my cart. You have to make it fun or you will go completely crazy!

    Roving has to be one of the most difficult things to do, especially as a new teacher. As a new teacher you have an enough issues to address and not having your own space makes life a lot harder. I still don't know if I'm getting a classroom or not next year. It sucks!

    Everyone on the forum seems really understanding about rovers, however there are a few that have no sympathy and I don't understand that. To those that have no sympathy, I would say this and to all (rovers included)....It's not about you! It's about the students and whatever needs to be done to make school easier for students needs to be done. That's how I am trying to live my career....it's not about me. If we all think like that we would realize that whether the classrooms are ours or not what does it matter??!!? We just have to all think about our students first and the classroom situation will fall into place.
     
  11. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Jul 9, 2007

    Yes, it is about the students...which is why each teacher should have their own room so they can most effectively and efficiently teach the students. If only, I know.
     
  12. Tookie Williams

    Tookie Williams Rookie

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    Jul 9, 2007

    I'm allowed to look out for myself though.
     
  13. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    Jul 9, 2007

    But, I think there is a difference between looking out for yourself and doing what you can to help all of the teachers in your school be successful for all of the students. We have more teachers than there are rooms, and therefore we all have teachers in our rooms during at least one of our prep times. Personally, I set my room up the way I want it, but I let the teacher who is in my room during first period know if I'm going to make a drastic change. I also save a bookcase for her to stash her students' binders and spare textbooks, and leave a bulletin board space for her if she wants it. I also make sure to show her where the basic supplies are (construction paper, markers, colored pencils, expo markers, etc.) so that she can use them if she needs to.
    We have teachers in our building that make the environment so hostile to the roaming teachers that neither the teacher nor the kids want to be in that room. Unfortunately for all involved, they are stuck in a bad situation for the whole year.
     
  14. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    Jul 9, 2007

    We have 8 science teachers and 6 science classrooms. I was always used to having my own classroom when I came here. I have had to learn to adapt. No one has their "own" classroom. This year I will teach in 3 different classrooms. There is no senority or anything (our department chair last year was in 3 classrooms). The only problem is when we do labs because no one wants to set up labs in 2 different rooms so we ed up switching classrooms to do labs so that all my chemistry classes are in the classroom the lab is set up in. The school wants a college atmosphere where no teacher is assigned to a particular room but I know I lose some of my management skills doing this. So why do I continue to teach there--we are a private school but make more money than the public school teachers in my area!
     
  15. Tookie Williams

    Tookie Williams Rookie

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    Jul 10, 2007


    Whoever has it the majority has control of the setup.
     

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