Do you ever teacher your kinders that the word A is pronoucned "uh"?

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by Peachyness, Aug 27, 2010.

  1. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2006
    Messages:
    6,181
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 27, 2010

    Do you ever teach your kinders that the word A is pronoucned "uh"?

    I guess it could be regional, but I never did. I told them that the word a is pronounced like the long a. Like, "I have (long) a pencil", not I have uh pencil. I don't know, uh, just don't sound right to me, but it could be regional.

    Do you teach your kids that the word A is pronounced "uh"? This was a question on PT and it got me thinking.
     
  2.  
  3. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2008
    Messages:
    1,927
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 27, 2010

    I do, only so they know it when they get to it. However, I don't do it until the end of the year when they're solid with their short vowel sounds, so they don't go and write the word "cut" and spell it "cat". :lol: The short vowels have to be solid, though.
     
  4. starbucks

    starbucks Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2007
    Messages:
    445
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 27, 2010

    I teach them both. I know that when I read I say "uh pencil." It is confusing and I know that it should be "a (long) pencil," but where I live most people would use "uh."
     
  5. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,958
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 27, 2010

    I don't address the word a as "uh". I do teach the word the as "the" and "thuh".
     
  6. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,552
    Likes Received:
    1,060

    Aug 27, 2010

    That word is pronounced like long a only when it's being stressed:

    I said a pencil, not ten pencils!

    In other circumstances, it follows the usual rule in English that, when stress shifts away from a syllable, the vowel in the syllable is pronounced as schwa.
     
  7. skerns

    skerns Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2004
    Messages:
    232
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 27, 2010

    Yes

    We teach "a" as a sight word "uh" and "the" as the sight word "thuh". We introduce after all letters and sounds have been taught and sentences are being introduced. It is actually in our curriculum that way. We teach a rhyme so they remember:

    A and the are sight words
    A and the are rhyming words.

    Pronounced of course uh and thuh.

    Never knew there was another way to say them. :)
     
  8. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2006
    Messages:
    4,858
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 28, 2010

    I've never thought about it either. I don't think I've ever taught it like that-just the long a sound. Hmmm.
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Aug 28, 2010

    Maybe it's regional???

    Around here, the long a sounds incredibly stilted.

    Everyone I know pronounces "a" with the short a.
     
  10. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2006
    Messages:
    3,565
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 28, 2010

    Schwa.

    Once upon uh time... Once upon Ay time...

    I think, Peachy, we are in the same region, and I am almost positive people pronounce the word a with a short sound.
     
  11. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,776
    Likes Received:
    151

    Aug 28, 2010

    I have introduced both ways mostly because I pronounce it both ways at different times...
     
  12. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,776
    Likes Received:
    151

    Aug 28, 2010

    In fact, because I teach in Mexico and there is so much focus on pronunciation, a mother asked me which was the correct way because her son told her both ways was correct. I explained to the mom that both ways are correct.
     
  13. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2006
    Messages:
    6,181
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 28, 2010

    I must be a weirdo, then. I say, Once upon (long) a time.

    I do have a strong accent. German and sign language were my first languages, so I guess that may be the reason why I speak so differently.
     
  14. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2006
    Messages:
    3,565
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 28, 2010

    Weirdo, not! I have a kid in class with a strong German accent who also pronounces the long A for the word a, now that you mention it. He also holds the last sound of words longer than native English speakers. One-ce Upon-ne A Ti-me. That does explain it, Peachy.
     
  15. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,939
    Likes Received:
    2,086

    Aug 30, 2010

    I don't think teachers 'teach' it...kids come to school saying 'I have uh mom and uh dad and uh sister'.:lol:

    The pronunciation on dictionary.com changes depending on how the word 'a' is used. As a preposition, the pronunciation featured is 'uh' but in other usages it's long a....

    http://www.referencecenter.com/ref/dictionary?query=a&invocationType=tl1clk&flv=1&resd=3
     
  16. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,552
    Likes Received:
    1,060

    Aug 30, 2010

    Interesting source. It's unfortunate that the grammatical categories' order can't be changed to reflect the frequency of each use.

    The prepositional use is still found dialectally and colloquially:

    A-hunting we will go

    but that is not a very productive use, and hasn't been very common outside of certain set phrases (go a-Maying, go a-courting) since no later than the fourteenth century - and therefore the long-A pronunciation is fairly improbable. (I can explain why that is, if anyone wants.)

    The use as noun simply refers to the letter, and for that the correct pronunciation in most Englishes is indeed "long a":

    A is for Apple

    The most common use of "a" is as indefinite article or determiner, and in the vast majority of varieties of English, the most common pronunciation of unstressed "a" is schwa.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 608 (members: 3, guests: 579, robots: 26)
test