Do you ever feel like there is not enough time to teach during the teaching day

Discussion in 'General Education' started by TeacherCuriousExplore, Jan 11, 2017.

  1. TeacherCuriousExplore

    TeacherCuriousExplore Comrade

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    Jan 11, 2017

    I recently started teaching VPK(Voluntary Pre Kindergarten) in the state of Florida and I feel like there isn't enough time during the teaching day to teach these young students the skills that they need for kindergarten. I use the ELLM+ Curriculum(Early Learning Literacy Model+). The curriculum is so great and have all the necessary skills that are needed for young learners however I find myself feeling like there isn't enough time in the day to teach each skill. I broke each young learner into small groups by colors. On mondays and Tuesdays we work on literacy skills and on Weds and Thurs we focus on Math skills at the teaching table. Friday is for science, social studies, and art skills as a whole group. Each small group alternate days they will see me at the teaching table. While one group is at the teaching table, the other groups are in learning centers for 30 to 40 mins. In the ELLM+, the daily schedule is broken up in blocks. According to the daily schedule, the first half of the day is to focus on literacy skills and the second half is to focus on Math and the arts. I may switch to this because it seems as if I am able to at least see each group every week. Any suggestions?
     
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  3. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

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    Jan 11, 2017

    Just about every day - and I teach middle school!
     
  4. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Jan 11, 2017

    yes, I have a couple of suggestions.

    Let it go. You will never, NEVER, have enough time to do everything perfectly. Teachers that say they do are full of it. Something has to give. Don't let it be your sanity.

    Streamline. When you differentiate, keep as much the same as possible.

    Organize everything. Label and file. Don't spend precious minutes looking for things.

    Get realistic. Concern yourself with growth, not mastery. Don't think you'll be able to play catch up.You won't. Students that struggle can grow even if they don't meet standards.
     
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  5. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jan 11, 2017

    every.day.of.my.life.
     
  6. TeacherCuriousExplore

    TeacherCuriousExplore Comrade

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    Jan 11, 2017

    Thanks a lot for this. I am trying so hard. We constantly have to document and assess that it is driving me wild!
     
  7. mrsf70

    mrsf70 Rookie

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    Jan 12, 2017

    " Let it go! Let it go!" :musicalscore: There is always more to be done and always things that can improve. Do what you can, improve where it's possible, then take care of yourself. Burnout is real and almost pushed me out of teaching a couple of years ago.
     
  8. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Jan 12, 2017

    In my first year, I recognized that you could work 24/7 and still not have enough time to do everything you want. At some point, you decide that health and family comes first, then this job—or you burn out trying to save the world all by yourself.

    That said, what we are all seeing is a tough situation made worse by legislators and for-profit lobbyists inserting near-constant testing and test preparation into a school day already too short for an increasingly disadvantaged student population. It seems as though there are forces hard at work ensuring we will not have time to do our jobs.

    While this might be great at destroying unions, cutting payroll, and developing sound bites, it is, undeniably, destroying the workforce. Then again, having most Americans uneducated and desperate likely appeals to any number of government leaders and business owners.
     
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  9. Justin Johnson

    Justin Johnson Rookie

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    Jan 14, 2017

    All the time! I teach 5th grade and you have to make every minute count with as much time that the students spend out of the classroom.
     
  10. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Every day of my life. And the longer I teach (I'm only in my 5th year) the worse it gets. I have a better knowledge of everything I should be doing than I used to, but it just doesn't fit!
     
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  11. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    So true! My coworkers and I were just talking about this. I always say that part of the reason my first 1-2 years of teaching were the easiest for me is because I was simply naïve about all of the things I should/could have been doing. Every year the job seems to get harder because I learn/realize more about all of the other things I should be doing.
     
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  12. MsAbeja

    MsAbeja Companion

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    Jan 15, 2017

    Could you give some examples? (first-year teacher, here)
     
  13. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Jan 16, 2017

    It's really just a lot of little things that add up and I think it could vary a lot depending on your specific position and school. One example for me is guided reading groups. My first year, I thought I had these "covered" because I was grouping students based on reading level, reading leveled books, and preparing different levels of questions to ask or skills to focus on based on the books we were reading. As far as decoding, I thought it was okay to just focus on different "fix up" strategies (like get your mouth ready to say the first sound, use context clues, chunk it out or sound it out). Then I started learning a lot more about phonics and how to teach using multisensory skills, then how to be more systematic with the phonics skills I was teaching, new strategies to teach sight words and then going even deeper into things like voiced/unvoiced sounds, teaching what your mouth should be doing when you're making specific sounds, etc. I think I was a 4th year teacher before I ever even realized/heard that English actually has 19 vowel sounds. Just last week I was talking to our district literacy person about how hard it is for my kids to memorize sight words and she was explaining that current research says that instead of teaching the entire word as a "trick word/sight word" and something that needs to be completely memorized, you should go through and have them talk about which sounds "play fair" and which sounds don't. They only need to know the sounds that "don't play fair" by heart. I thought I had a lot of great strategies already for sight words and here I am still learning something new! It's pretty crazy to think back to my first year when I thought I had everything covered by reading and discussing/writing about leveled books with my kids.
     

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