Do you ask parents to buy stuff for your class?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by 2ndTimeAround, Mar 30, 2014.

  1. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    I don't ask for anything because my school is in such a low SES area. I do, however, offer extra credit for bringing in certain pencils or boxes of tissue. The points are so low that they're really meaningless, but at least a few kids will go for it.
     
  2. OhThePlaces

    OhThePlaces Cohort

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    I most definitely have a wishlist!

    My school and PTA are very generous, and I can request most things (staples, copy paper, expo markers and envelopes were my most recent requests) and they end up in my box within the day.

    My grade-level sends home a monthly newsletter, and there's a small section for each teacher's class needs... My current list includes tissues and hand soap. My principal has no issue with this, and parents in my neighborhood are generous.
     
  3. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    This. It drives me nuts that some teachers will give credit for students who bring in tissues or paper towels, even if the points are insignificant in their grades. It's supposed to be against policy, but I'm sure it's still being done.

    I've got all seniors, so the number of parents who come to back to school night is fairly low. I stick post-it notes with a few requests on the table by my sign-in sheet, usually for reams of neon colored paper, which I use for major assignments (harder for the kids to lose), hand sanitizer, and tissues. I get maybe 25% of them filled. This year a couple of parents were exceptionally generous, so I'm set for tissues and hand sanitizer into next year! :haha:
     
  4. Nate

    Nate Companion

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    Mar 31, 2014

    I usually have parents who bring stuff in, so a list is helpful. Some years I get 8 bottles of hand sanitizer, so leaving it off the list the next year cuts down on oversupplies. No "learning" stuff, though--just "living" stuff. So: tissues, clorox wipes, snack cupboard refills, and plastic silverware, but not pencils, papers, markers, and so on.
     
  5. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    I would ask for some of the "living" supplies. Most parents would ask me if I saw them outside of school!
    I felt bad when we would have to use school issues.... ugh...runny nose & hard tissues...awful.
     
  6. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I strongly disagree with ANY change in grade based on bringing in supplies such as pencils and tissues. Strongly.

    Question about volunteer hours for parents. Why does this matter? Why do adults keep track of their hours? (Honest question.)
     
  7. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Mar 31, 2014

    This is pretty common at my school. Most teachers have wish lists. I sometimes send requests for things like napkins or plastic grocery bags, but I never seem to run out of supplies. In fact, I usually give kids tons of supplies to take home at the end of the year. :/
     
  8. Rox

    Rox Cohort

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    Mar 31, 2014

    I teach in a low SES area, and we are not allowed to request supplies. My district provides most of what is needed, and anything else I have been able to get from donorschoose.

    If I sent home a wish list, I have one student who, I would not be surprised if he stole stuff just to give it to me.

    I agree that it's not appropriate to give points for bringing supplies in. Grades should not be affected by the amount of money the family has.
     
  9. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Many charter schools with "blind, open enrollments" make sure they only get good parents by requiring a certain amount of volunteer hours, or a specific amount per week. That helps weed out single parent families, poor working families, etc, but still gives the impression of being "level" with public schools.
     
  10. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Ah, got it. Thanks. :)
     
  11. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    I see nothing wrong with trying to get the most involved parents possible. Might cut out on some other headaches down the road for the staff at that school.
     
  12. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    That's fine, but it kind of defeats the whole purpose of charter schools... and leads to incorrect perceptions that charter schools are somehow more effective than local public schools.
     
  13. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Some teachers give extra credit? It´s not academic at all! :eek:
     
  14. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    I sent out a wishlist at the beginning of the year. I only had a couple of parents bring something in, but it's better than nothing. I teach in a lower SES area but most families are not extremely poor, if that makes sense. I've heard it referred to as a "working class" area. It is frustrating because the classroom teachers can send out a supply list, but if I want all of my kids to have something I have to purchase it. We do have a supply budget, so it's not too bad but it's frustrating that I spent almost my entire budget on binders/dividers for every student and things like boxes of tissues and clorox wipes while most of the other teachers could simply put those things on their class supply lists.
     
  15. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    I don't agree with this, but that's a topic for another thread.

    The purpose of a charter school, ultimately, is to provide a different educational choice. Some charters incorporate parent partnerships into their program. I don't agree that requiring volunteer hours means that NO single parents/working parents/low income parents can participate in the school. I work in a very low income area at a charter that does not require hours, but we have many parents who love to volunteer, even if it's just taking something home to prep.

    But again, :sorry:, off topic.
     
  16. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    I one of those parents who will help. I need to know what the teacher needs. I do go to lots of thrift stores. If I know what the teacher needs, I can buy equipment for her. The K teachers loved me, as I knew that they could use wooden puzzles, counting bears, etc. At one school, the big "what we need" bulletin board was in the hallway. I don't think any parent felt obligated to purchase any of the items. But, if your child was done playing with his legos, why not donate them.
     
  17. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    I only ask parents if it is something ONLY their child needs and not something the whole class needs. If I need it for the whole class then I will buy it myself or the school will provide it.
     
  18. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I definitely ask for donations of paper, colored paper, tissue paper, office supplies, and anything they can think of that might help us. I'm not ashamed of asking but then again that is the norm for our school. I don't see why a school would make a policy against it. If most students parents can't afford it, oh well, but there's no harm in asking.
     
  19. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Agree. Extra credit is a bad idea. We do give letters so that parents can claim their donations as tax refundable items on their tax return.
     
  20. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    But some are more effective, not all, but some. Just as some public schools are better than others.

    As someone that works at a public charter school, I can ensure you that some charter schools are performing above and beyond neighboring public schools and other charters (like mine) are a mess.
     

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