District did an exit interview

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Mami1Maestra2, Nov 7, 2018.

  1. Mami1Maestra2

    Mami1Maestra2 Rookie

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    Nov 7, 2018

    We received information about an exit interview given to teachers leaving the district.
    This made me think of how teacher evaluations can be affected by the number of discipline referrals submitted to the office. It becomes a "you can't manage your class" deal.

    What if we held administration responsible for teachers leaving their schools/districts?

    Last year, 8 teachers were gone from our school before the school year ended. This year we have lost 1. Doesn't seem like anyone else is going anywhere, but it really made me wonder if administration would be more flexible, respectful, and understanding toward teachers if they were held accountable for teachers being dissatisfied? The data from the exit interview showed that there were about 3 major reasons teachers left with the highest being lack of support from administration.

    Any thoughts?
     
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  3. corunnermom

    corunnermom Rookie

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    Nov 8, 2018

    This is a tricky situation. Yes, I think some administration can be difficult to work with. But I wonder if admin truly isn't supportive or if they're hands are tied and can't be as supportive as they would like. Lots of factors come into play. I actually just resigned mid year, more for personal reasons but my current teaching situation was a big factor. Admin is very supportive at my school with any behavior issues I have in my classroom. I have three students with severe behavior issues so everyday involves management and very little teaching. However, our school has a history of high suspensions and expulsions so admin is trying all that they can to keep disruptive students in the classroom and lower that rate. Unfortunately, this doesn't benefit ANYONE. My disruptive kids are not learning logical consequences, my other students are suffering academically and socially, and I can't get through a lesson without having a major issue. And we HAVE to get kids up to level and admin pressures us to do that. I burned out in September and made the decision to move closer to family and substitute teach for a while. Sooooo, all that being said, it's a big mess that needs to be figured out. So I don't necessarily blame admin but I kinda do, if that makes sense!
     
  4. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Nov 8, 2018

    You mean they got rid of them midyear? Wow.
     
  5. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Companion

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    Nov 8, 2018

    I agree with you, however, admins can stand up to downtowns, if they choose to. There are always things that sometimes just have to be done, but a good admin, in my opinion, is one who puts the students and the teachers first, and higher ups last. The best two principals I had did not cater to downtown--directives that came from them were examined--if they were going to help--then great. If not, they were ignored or sent back for review. The first fought tooth and nail with the superintendent, but the super had brought him in to open a new school, so the super knew full well that the principal would walk if issues were pushed. The second knew what worked and didn't. When he was conventiently given a new job for more pay and more time at home(he was one of those principals who never saw his own family--he was the first one in, the last one at, at every event, etc.) to make room for a crony, the school promptly fell apart. When the crony was fired, along with the superintendent for misappropriation of funds, they brought the old principal back. Voila! School back to what it was before.
     
  6. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

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    Nov 8, 2018

    I think this is so much more complex than simply holding Ps accountable. What if teachers were held accountable when students left their school? To me neither makes sense. In both situations the people involved need to be reflective but having a standard of blame doesn't make sense.

    For starters, if someone leaves (student or teacher) it can be a good thing or a bad thing depending on the person leaving. HR actually has a term for this (though I can't remember) where basically the company benefits if weak employees leave on their own. Why they leave can be because the teacher/P did something beneficial or not. For example, in my province we have 2 public systems and often kids will leave our system because they think everything their child has a problem with is the fault of our school. You know what often happens? 6 months later they are back because the grass wasn't greener. I don't think this reflects badly on me as a teacher (who has sat in many meetings as the special education person where the parent basically blames me for their choice to move their child) but I do reflect - could we have done something differently?

    As for the idea that admin can just 'stand up for their schools' I would again argue complex. It depends on so many factors -how long the admin has been with the district, how much job security they have, etc. Same as teachers - we don't ask our brand new teachers to buck the system - we ask those with tenure to do that.
     
  7. Mami1Maestra2

    Mami1Maestra2 Rookie

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    Nov 8, 2018

    No, the teachers quit of their own volition.
     
    SpecialPreskoo likes this.

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