Discouraged By Students

Discussion in 'College' started by snrein1016, Feb 27, 2012.

  1. snrein1016

    snrein1016 New Member

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    Feb 27, 2012

    I have had such a horrible day I'm wondering if I might need to change my profession. I really need some feedback to know if things get better.

    I teach in an intensive English program and we have lots of behavior problems, and what it comes down to is that I struggle with the problem students, and it colors the way I look at teaching. I don't want to deal with students who could care less about their education, who sleep in class or never do their homework or talk in their native language the whole class. Does this make me a bad teacher? Cause I feel like a bad teacher. Many teachers in my department can tolerate it, but it makes me miserable. I'm looking for another job, but I'm worried that there will be difficult students everywhere.

    I need to know if it gets better. If there are universities out there that don't have the major discipline issues we do. Am I too high stung for teaching, or is this a particularly bad job and there are places I will be happy?

    I'm feeling so discouraged I would love some feedback.
     
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  3. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    Feb 27, 2012

    What type of university is this? Do you have the option of kicking the problem students out?
     
  4. snrein1016

    snrein1016 New Member

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    Feb 27, 2012

    Yes, I kick the offenders out. It does not affect them though. Then they speak to the student affairs coordinators, who are instructors whose job it is to deal with all the problem students we have. Ultimately, they can get removed from the program all together, but like I said, it has no effect on improving their behavior.
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Feb 28, 2012

    No, it does not make you a bad teacher. You're on the college level; there should be certain assumptions you can make about the behavior of adults.

    I think it's probably an indication of a group of not-yet-adults who have no idea of what they want to do after high school and considered college a good place to wait while they figured it out.
     
  6. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Feb 28, 2012

    On another side, there will be problem students no matter where you go. There just might not be as many or they will have different problems (maybe ones that are more tolerable for you).
     
  7. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Virtuoso

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    Feb 28, 2012

    If you have the ability to remove the students who don't want to be there, remove them. That way, you can concentrate on the students who want your help. These are students who pay for each education credit, so it's their own fault if they choose to squander their purchases.
     
  8. bison

    bison Habitué

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    Feb 28, 2012

    One note: if a student does well other than sleeping in class, I wouldn't assume it's always intentional. I have sleep issues and sometimes I literally just cannot stay awake in college classes that are nothing but lecture. I've had to contact professors privately to apologize and let them know it's unintentional and not because I am uninterested. I still typically get straight As.
     
  9. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Feb 28, 2012

    Sleeping in class is rude. If you're just going to sleep in class anyway, you would do just as well staying at home. What's even the point of going to class?
     
  10. TeachOn

    TeachOn Habitué

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    Feb 28, 2012

    This is the dark side of the "college is for everyone" delusion. I certainly hope that my tax dollars aren't subsidizing this nonsense.
     
  11. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Fanatic

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    Feb 28, 2012

    Some colleges have a mandatory attendance policy. I had a former student who had to retake a math class (which she made a high B in) after missing a week of classes (three classes) due to illness with a doctor's note. Because she had already missed two other classes (one for a funeral, and one because her alarm didn't go off) she failed the class with an 88%. She will have to pay to retake it.

    Given the choice of paying to retake a course, and sleeping in class, I'll sleep in class. I will admit to dosing off during lecture classes a time or two in college. A two hour lecture, even about the most interesting topic, will put me right to sleep.
     
  12. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Feb 28, 2012

    If a school has a mandatory attendance policy, it's presumably because the school believes that the student will learn more by being in class and by listening to the professor or by engaging with classmates. That won't happen if the student is sleeping in class. I maintain my claim that it's rude. If I were the professor, I'd boot sleeping students unless they had some sort of narcolepsy or something. If I taught at a university with an attendance policy, I'd also make sure to keep a record of booting them out of class so that they'd get hit on attendance and fail the course. I don't think there's any real justification for sleeping in class except with some sort of medical condition. Frankly, if the medical condition is so severe that the student can't keep his eyes open for the duration of a class period, the student should consider alternate courses, distance learning, or correspondence school.
     

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