Detention (lunch and after school)

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by bandnerdtx, Apr 19, 2015.

  1. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Apr 19, 2015

    I'm currently at a school that does not offer any kind of detention at all. We are looking at incorporating that next year to handle some of the minor discipline issues we are facing.

    How do your schools assign detention? Who is in charge? How long does it last? How effective is it? What are some of the best and worst practices you've seen with managing detention?

    Any help or suggestions you can provide would be greatly appreciated. :)
     
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  3. The Natural Log

    The Natural Log Rookie

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    Apr 19, 2015

    Most of our detentions are actually Saturday detentions handled by teachers who get paid to come in to administer them. They are 3 hours on Saturday morning.
     
  4. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    Apr 19, 2015

    At my school, teachers don't assign detentions. We just write referrals and the admin team hands out consequences. We hold regular detention twice a week, 2:15-3:45 and Saturday detention from 8-12.

    Teachers sign up to oversee detention and are paid to do so.
     
  5. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Apr 19, 2015

    We have lunch and after school detentions.
    teachers assign them, call the office ti put them on the list, right before lunch the list is announced, the P also calls the names out at the lunch window. We have a rotation of duty, so I will be doing detentions in May. (small school so each teacher has about 2.5 months of detentions / school year).

    The kids either sit on a detention bench, and eat together or sit in the classroom with that teacher if there are too many.
    They have a choice to serve lunch or after school, and they must serve it within 2 days or they can get suspended. (if they're on probation, they must serve on the same day).

    I think these detentions are very effective most of the time. It seems like it's very little, the kids sit out about 25 minutes of the 30 minutes lunch (so they can still use the restroom, etc) and they can't socialize with their peers, and that seems to be a huge deal. I think it's also the feeling of serving a punishment, it's kind of funny, these kids act so tough, they're gangmembers, running the streets, have been locked up for some pretty serious offenses and then they wine about 25 minutes sitting on the bench.

    Different teachers have different styles, obviously when they sit on the bench outside, the kids can talk, but when in the classroom, it's probably cut down to a minimum. When I hold detentions, I tell the kids if they talk, the detention will not count and they will have to serve it again. I give them about 2 warnings, and if they're still running their mouth, I kick them out, and they'll have to serve the whole thing the next day.
     
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Apr 19, 2015

    This. :yeahthat:

    How effective depends on two things (IMO): Are the parents going to be allies or opponents to the detentions, which affects how the students respond? In addition, do the students value their time and realize that this is an outcome they have earned? The students earn the detention based on the quality and frequency of the referrals, so if they can see the relationship, it can work. If the detention interferes with sports or other after school activities, it makes a larger impact. If they come and nap, not as positive an impact.

    I oppose lunch detention - that punishes the teacher as much as the student.
     
  7. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Apr 19, 2015

    Just wanted to add that at my school we don't get a duty free lunch / prep until after the school day (technically). It's weird, but it's a small school and we must supervise the kids during break and lunch.
    So i really don't mind, at times actually prefer to sit in my classroom supervising lunch detention, because I can comfortable sit and eat, look at the internet, clean my desk and prep fro lessons.
     
  8. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Apr 19, 2015

    We have after school but it's mostly for kids who don't do their homework. The teacher assigns it and then they have the option of going that day or the next day. If they skip it, they usually get a Saturday school. Our principal will also assign it. Usually for at least three after schools. Teachers monitor it by week voluntarily. It's one hour and we're paid $18 per hour. Saturday schools are four hours at the same hourly rate.
     
  9. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Apr 19, 2015

    Thanks for all of the input. I'm curious how schools handle who is assigned detention. I'm gathering that most schools rotate lunch detentions (which seem to be used to discipline milder infractions such as dress code violations, etc.) and most pay teachers extra for after school detention. Why do most of your schools assign detention afterschool/Saturday? What infractions get them assigned to it?
     
  10. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    Apr 19, 2015

    My most recent referrals that got detention were:

    Refusing to work/keep head up
    Walking out of class
    Being disrespectful/disruptive
    Being tardy repeatedly
    Skipping class
     
  11. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Apr 20, 2015

    Disrespect is our big one. Lying usually gets them a Saturday school.
     
  12. jw12

    jw12 Rookie

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    May 17, 2015

    Teachers in my school are allowed to assign their own lunch detention or after-school detention, although we're not paid any more to administer these. So, most of us send problems to the students' Dean, who hands out the punishment. Generally, consequences go in the following order:

    1. In-School-Suspension (ISS) for a period
    2. ISS for a day
    3. Wednesday night school
    4. Saturday school
    5. Alternative school

    We have a dedicated aide who runs ISS, and another who takes care of the Wednesday night and Saturday schools. And a whole staff in a separate building who runs the alternative school.
     
  13. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    May 17, 2015

    There is no official "detention" process our school has. It's up to each individual teacher whether or not they issue a detention, and that usually means the kid ends up coming during your lunch time, during which time you need to monitor him/her. Some teachers are willing to do this to keep students accountable, some are not.

    The admin strongly encourages us to solve issues during class and not take away lunch, but they allow us to do it if we so please (to a certain extent; they must be allowed some time to get lunch and eat). We can't do after school detentions at all because many kids take the bus.

    Sometimes admin does an admin detention but that is usually for extreme issues, or things that happen outside the classroom.
     

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