Data driven instruction?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by CDOR79, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. CDOR79

    CDOR79 Comrade

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    Jun 13, 2018

    Hi all,

    Just curious of how you use data to drive your instruction in various subjects. Have you found it to make a huge difference?

    Anything you could share would be great!
     
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  3. shoreline02

    shoreline02 Cohort

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    Jun 13, 2018

    Yep, I use it but in different ways (5th science). Exit tickets: quick assessment on lesson which allows me to see who "got it" and who didn't. Then I adjust my small group instruction around this data. Quizzes: give a bit more data on a given subject, topic, or theme. This also allows me adjust my small group instruction or possibly even re-teach. When analyzing data, you can also look for patterns and misconceptions to address. Hope this helps!
     
  4. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Jun 13, 2018

    I do the same!
     
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  5. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    Jun 13, 2018

    What they said. For me, it's used for, is the class ready to move on? Ready except for a few that could use some TLC? Are we completely lost?
     
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  6. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Jun 14, 2018

    I also agree with the above. 3 cautions came to my mind, though.

    1. It's important to ensure the data actually reflects the behavioral objectives of the lesson; sometimes a small but important outcome can be overlooked in an assessment. A common assumption in math, for example, occurs when students can answer a place value activity 100%, yet still have no clue in understanding actual place value (especially in older math workbooks).

    2. Sometimes students who need more time in grasping a concept are mislabeled. A common mislabel is to deem a student lazy and say, "S/he could do it if s/he tried," especially when that student does pass an assessment and the teacher assumes that proves her/his laziness. There are many other factors that could be the cause. Also some students are mislabeled as "slow learners" or lacking intelligence but in reality, no two brains work alike. Teachers and texts have an ideal pace but each individual brain has various previous learnings and various brain connections for new learning.

    3. Sometimes teachers slow down the pace unnecessarily. I recall a spring pod meeting where one teacher confessed her students were still in the first chapter in the math book. Sometimes the class needs to move on. Another solution to this scenario is to be cautious not to remedy low assessments by reteaching or redrilling the same old same old. If something isn't working, it's time to try another approach.
     
  7. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Jun 15, 2018

    Our students take the ERB's in the later part of the school year. Those scores are reviewed and Math/LAR teachers create goals on what needs to improve. They will work on increasing those skills/topics the following year and seeing if there is improvement in their own grade - as well as - the grade that has moved up. As a science teacher, I review what their goals are and figure out how I can increase those in my own class, but I don't have to specifically set any goals based on that test. It has led to us getting a better LAR and Math curriculum in place - some push back from parents (because they don't understand the idea of trying to get students to think critically), but we have seen growth.

    LAR teachers also give me reading levels based on their testing of the students. It helps me to differentiate the activities for my students based on that information (saves me time from having to test them too).

    Then, of course, I'm using formative assessments to determine who gets it, needs more time with it, and who is completely lost.
     
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  8. CDOR79

    CDOR79 Comrade

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    Jun 17, 2018

    Great information! I agree that sometimes this data could be inaccurate. Like one poster said, although they may get the answer right, do they actually “get” it?!

    Like everything else with teaching, it is an ongoing process that needs to be reassessed itself! That’s one of the challeges about teaching. If done right, you’ll never get bored and it’ll never become
    a stagnant job!

    Thanks so much for the replies!
     
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  9. eiwactor

    eiwactor Rookie

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    Jul 28, 2018

    I use data in a variety of ways to drive instruction in my classroom. During ELA instruction, students are given exit slips which include questions that require constructed responses that are closely related to the essential question/standard for the day. Based on this data, I may need to revisit the standard for the entire group. Generally, I use this data to guide small group instruction; students of lower ability will receive more scaffolding to learn the concept while high achieving students will be challenged by applying the concept through extended thinking.
     
  10. eiwactor

    eiwactor Rookie

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    Jul 28, 2018

    My students do Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) testing three times a year. It seems very similar to the testing that you mention here. The data from the test is accessed online, and students can be organized into small groups based on their lowest strands. From this information I would decide who needs more intervention in informational texts vs literary texts and in what areas. I agree that it is a convenient way to differentiate instruction as you can easily see what they need.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2018
  11. eiwactor

    eiwactor Rookie

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    Jul 28, 2018


    I agree with your third point about teachers who spend excess time trying to get students to understand certain concepts. Unfortunately, time is limited in our classrooms, and there is plenty more content to cover. Sometimes when we move on, these concepts begin to make more sense to students in future lessons, in a different context. The worse thing that we can do, as you mentioned, is teaching the same concept using the same method. To see change in learning, we must change our teaching.
     

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