Daily set-up for 9th grade Honors English

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by hammer2, Jul 6, 2007.

  1. hammer2

    hammer2 Rookie

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    Jul 6, 2007

    I will be teaching 9th grade Honors English in the fall. Any help as to what an average day looks like would be helpful. How much time is allotted each day for grammar, writing, literature? Are certain days just for writing, grammar, reading? Thanks to anyone who gives me guidance.
     
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  3. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Jul 6, 2007

    I think most high school English teachers still work within literature based units. For example, you may start the year with reading a novel/genre study; that doesn't mean all you do is read everyday because we all know that when you write about what you read that you comprehend it more, but the writing that takes place during the novel/genre study will probably not be as formal. Now, at the end of the unit, you may very well have a formal essay and incorporate grammar instruction in that. Make sense?

    I guess what I'm saying is that most of my days tend to focus on either reading/writing/literature. I work grammar, spelling and vocabulary into those three core areas.
     
  4. Ms.H

    Ms.H Companion

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    Jul 9, 2007

    You listed reading, writing, and literature as "three core areas." What, in your mind and/or classroom, separates "reading" from "literature"? I'm just curious as I share the original poster's question.
     
  5. hammer2

    hammer2 Rookie

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    Jul 9, 2007

    Sorry, I meant literature.
     
  6. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Jul 9, 2007

    Well, depending on the grade and academic level of the class, some high school students still require actual instruction in the act of reading. Literature study, to me anyway, is more about literary analysis and criticism, which is a much more advanced skill.
     
  7. ChangeAgent

    ChangeAgent Comrade

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    Jul 9, 2007

    Nice distinction, bandnerdtx.

    Students need work with grammar, and that can be taught (directly) in mini-lessons as students write.

    Writing can be in relation to literature being read, or as studies of types of writing (persuasion, compare-and-contrast, etc.). These can be essays, journals, etc.

    Reading instruction is important since we don't read all texts the same way. You can teach "talking to the text," in which students use post-it notes or write right on the document/story (depending on situation/materials!), asking questions, writing down relevant material, making connections, etc. Reading instruction also has to do, I think, with comprehension and metacognitive strategies. Did I understand what I just read? Should I reread? etc.

    Then, as bandnerdtx said, literature would be literary analysis and criticism, or at least reading stories/novels/nonfiction/etc. and applying concepts, making connections, and applying what they read to their own lives. Studying themes or characters would fall under this category. Also, the "classics" are here, of course!

    In my 10th grade student teaching placement (with special education students--coincidentally, I was just hired for the same position), the district had a grammar program that I was to use. It was direct instruction. So, I would try to do that for fifteen minutes here and there. My focus was on looking at the literature, and as we did so, we looked at reading strategies (I had students talk to the text for one activity). I had students journal on other things we read or discussed.

    How long are your periods/blocks?

    I had to teach in 85 minute blocks. This required me, nearly, to divide the class into sections most days. I would cover grammar, reading, and direct instruction on literary terms, themes, or whatever. Discussion was also used heavily. Depending on your time, you may be able to divide your class like this. Otherwise, you can work on integrating each aspect into a unit, covering some concepts some days, and others another.
     

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