Daily schedule for a self-contained classroom

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by laf10, Jun 13, 2010.

  1. laf10

    laf10 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 28, 2010
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 13, 2010

    I'm starting my first year of teaching this fall, and I'm trying to plan a daily schedule for my 8 or 9 high school kids. 3 of them are very cognitively delayed and will be doing their own individual curriculum with their 1:1 aides. The rest of the kids are academically on a K-1st grade level. The other self-contained class at my school is higher functioning, and the teacher in that room has a schedule planned that emphasizes basic academic skills with little life skills time. For example, she is planning a period for spelling, reading, writing, math, and science. Because my kids are so functional, I feel like I should be focusing more on life skills, but I'm struggling to figure out an actual schedule. I don't just want to plan for "life skills." I would like "Life skills math" and "Life skills reading." Are there any other life skills areas that I can work on that can stand on their own like the examples I gave?

    Here's what I have so far:
    -morning work (where they will learn to write addresses, phone numbers, etc.)
    -calendar time (I know this is elementary, but my kids are very low, and I want to encourage social skills during this time)
    -reading (I was thinking of doing a reading time where we actually read short books, and also have a life skills reading time where we focused on reading community words like signs, etc.
    -math (again, I was thinking of doing an actual math with addition, subtraction, etc, and doing a life skills math, like with an in class grocery store)
    -PE
    -science
    -life skills cooking

    Any suggestions of other subjects or activities to do with this group of students?
     
  2.  
  3. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,186
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 13, 2010

    I like how you're concentrating on functional math and reading. At the high school level, we need to seriously start getting them ready for independent living - not story-writing or multiplication. The only other activities that I do that you didn't mention is health, social skills, and work/community. And in a high school classroom, I'd think that vocational activities would be really important. We introduce those skills in junior high. Your grocery store would be a useful tool for both math and vocational. And I'll be doing the same thing so we should exchange "notes" on that. ;) (I already have two large boxes full of empty grocery/food containers.)
     
  4. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Messages:
    536
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 13, 2010

    also what about CBI (community based instruction)
     
  5. laf10

    laf10 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 28, 2010
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 14, 2010

    It is technically a CBI classroom, although from what I've read about other CBI programs, I don't think my district has a true CBI program. We will go on community trips some, but definitely not weekly, although I plan to go as much as they will let us.

    Thanks for the ideas! Our juniors and seniors do school to work programs individually either in the school or at nearby sheltered workshops for part of the day. For my students who do not do school to work (I will have mostly 10th grade, so most of mine will not be doing the school to work program this year), I will be incorporating vocational skills within some of the life skills time. I plan to have life skills stations like folding towels, setting up a place setting, etc, and I will also include vocational stations during this time, too. I would like to teach health, and I may try to incorporate that some, but our district wants us to stay away from sex ed instruction for some reason.
     
  6. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Messages:
    536
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 14, 2010

    what about teaching more private/public behaviors, explain private and public and the behaviors that go in each category and name public places and private places. shaving, brushing teeth 2 times a day, bathing and keeping our selves clean, using deoderant, brushing our hair, etc. just basic health skills.
     
  7. laf10

    laf10 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 28, 2010
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 15, 2010

    Good idea. Thanks!
     
  8. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Messages:
    1,873
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 15, 2010

    LAF,

    I teach a middle school autism classroom (self-contained).

    A few suggestions for you:

    Follow the "periods" that the other kids follow - this will help them have a "typical" high school experience, "change classes" when the bell rings, etc. - it makes for a great transition time, too.

    You can call your "calendar" time something age appropriate - in my classroom we call it, "Morning Focus." We review the schedule, do an Edmark lesson, go through our "morning focus books" (includes questions like, "Who is our president?" "Who is the governor of NJ?" "What state do we live in?" etc. - I have visuals for each kid, we turn the pages and answer each question. It's great for differentiating because I can ask higher level questions to the higher kids and lower level questions (same thing each day) for the lower kids. I've heard other teachers call this time "Daily Meeting" or "Morning Review." You could name it anything age appropriate!

    Check out the Edmark Functional Word Series. It is so (SO) old-school but works SO well. My kids now know every possible grocery word, sign word, restaurant word, it is IMPRESSIVE. My kids are varying levels but those are all such functional words for them. We use this during Morning Focus and during Language Arts time.

    Check out Unique Learning System - it's an online standards based curriculum but includes a ton of real-life daily living application activities that go with a theme. I will be using it next year and it's also great because it comes "pre-differentiated" (they did the work for you for lower/higher kids).

    Include a period for vocational skills - and start this out by just creating independent work stations for the kids. It is a vocational skill to be able to work independently (without prompting/teacher guidance). I can give you more details on this if you want.

    We spend almost a full period cleaning our classroom. This is also a good "life skill." I have the kids get ready for the next day, fix the calendar, make their schedules, fill out a note (to go home to their parents about their day), wipe down all tables, mats, trampolines, swings, etc., spray disinfectant on all toys, handles, anything that was touched, etc. We also clean our own bathroom. (The janitor still comes at night, but we do this for practice - they follow a little bathroom cleaning schedule).

    I have more thoughts - but that's all I can think of for now. I will post more later!!
     
  9. sammyrams

    sammyrams Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2006
    Messages:
    167
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 15, 2010

    I am loving your ideas teachersk. I am trying to change things up for my middle school life skills program this year and want to implement some of your ideas. Thanks!
     
  10. laf10

    laf10 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 28, 2010
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 16, 2010

    Those are great ideas, teachersk! What kinds of activities do you do for vocational skills? I would love to hear more about that!
     
  11. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Messages:
    536
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 16, 2010

    there should be an earlier thread explaining teacehrsk's matching activities as well!
     
  12. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,186
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 16, 2010

    Check out these do-it-yourself TEACCH work tasks for vocational center ideas. Good place to start.

    sk - love the idea about using the bells and switching activities based on those. Why didn't I think of that???
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. itanewgentmarqu,
  2. Mariooo19,
  3. blazer,
  4. MrHopefulTeach
Total: 385 (members: 4, guests: 275, robots: 106)
test