Daily 5 - Insubordination

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by newbie23, Aug 27, 2011.

  1. newbie23

    newbie23 Comrade

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    Aug 27, 2011

    I'm turning to the wealth of knowledge here at AtoZ for some advice.

    I'm introducing Daily 5 for the first time (the students all did Daily 5 last year and some for 2 years now). It's going well and I'm following a basic framework that is outlined in the books and online. My 3rd grade students are building stamina and after 1 week (well 4 days I suppose) they're up to 7 minutes of read to self. During this time, I've been circulating the room and listening to students read. I'm writing down a few informal notes and I know that these will be helpful in the future as we work towards more of the independent goal setting.

    I'm having an issue though with one of my students. He's unwilling to read aloud to me or any of the aides that have been visiting our Daily 5 time. On Wednesday he completely shut down when I asked him if he would pick out a passage to read to me. By shutdown, I mean he turned away, wouldn't look at me and was completely insubordinate. Then he started distracting other students in an unsafe manner. He was escorted to my Ps office by one of our Title teachers (he's well known in the office for other more serious offenses). The next day he came in and had another chat with the P in the morning. He seemed to be much more respectful and we had a great morning. Daily 5 came around and he wasn't willing to read to me. He shut down again and refused to read period but didn't distract his classmates. Yesterday, he wouldn't read to me but he would at least say, "no" when I gave him options such as reading into a tape recorder, reading to a younger student who was struggling, reading to the P or another teacher, etc. He just enjoyed saying "no" and shooting down all of these options.

    Finally, I said, "Well, I want you to know that I'm proud of you for still practicing your read to self." He was very excited to tell me that he's not been reading, he just looks at the pictures. To which I replied, "Well fortunately, we learned this week that one way to read a book is by reading pictures." Boy was he embarrassed. Still, I'm not sure that he'll be willing to read to me next week.

    Does anyone have any suggestions for when a student refuses to comply with reading aloud to you? I need to get something that will work now so this isn't a battle all year. BTW, this student is on a 30 DRA and read aloud to his teacher last year. Apparently there have been problems with him not receiving his meds and his home life is not stable in the least. Next week I'll be starting a behavior plan with him but I'm at a loss for how to treat this specific area.
     
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  3. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Aug 27, 2011

    Any issues in any other areas other than this one specific time? If so, it may be helpful to consider any patterns that may be emerging.

    My first reaction is that he may be resentful for the incident the first day when he was punished and embarrassed during that same period of time. I might spend a bit of time rebuilding the relationship during some down time or recess time, possibly trying to have him read aloud very discreetly during a different part of the day, backing off the read aloud for a few days (give alternatives as options), and talk with him at the beginning of the day telling him that that time will be different, and that you want him to enjoy that time.

    The big thing is to get back on his good side, back off of the power struggle that is likely read aloud time, etc.
     
  4. mrs100

    mrs100 Comrade

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    Aug 27, 2011

    I'd provide him with a choice. He can either read with you during class, or come in at another time (during a preferred activity) to do so. If he will not read to you during Dailies, then he comes in during recess, or a special, or during a fun activity. If he still won't cooperate, he continues to miss that fun time until he does. What a stinker! Kids can be so stubborn. I'm sure there is an underlying reason - confidence or past history with another teacher or something from his home life. Hard to help him excel when he has put up such a wall.
     
  5. mb_teacher

    mb_teacher Companion

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    Aug 27, 2011

    Do you know for a fact that he actually CAN read? My first thought is that maybe he actually can't read and has somehow skated by.
     
  6. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 27, 2011

    This was my immediate thought as well.
     
  7. newbie23

    newbie23 Comrade

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    Aug 27, 2011

    I suppose I'm relying on his 30 DRA score in assuming he can read. Also, his past treachers have assured me he fully participated in this reading previously. This is the only area in the day in which he is this defiant. Other times he is chatty or distracts others but never this defiant. This week I had recess duty so having him stay in was not an option. I think I may try that this week when I don't have a duty.
     
  8. mb_teacher

    mb_teacher Companion

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    Aug 27, 2011

    Ahh, yeah, a 30 DRA would definitely state that he can read!! :)
    Ummm, what is he interested in? I would bribe him. haha
    Like, if he reads to you, then he can have an afternoon of just reading comic books or a special book. I would do this a little bit. But, he has to earn the privilege.
    If he continues, I would involve the parents and possibly the school counselor.
     
  9. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    Aug 27, 2011

    I also would think there are some serious issues with his reading ability especially if he is fine in other circumstances.
     
  10. newbie23

    newbie23 Comrade

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    Aug 28, 2011

    I've tried making a phone call home but unfortunately there's little support. The poor guy didn't spend one night last week in his own bed and was staying with "friends." He has a few items of clothing and toiletries in his backpack. I know that there's obviously a lot more to the story than I know currently and I need to build up that trust and fulfill those basic needs. It's very early though and sometimes it takes a long time to establish that relationship.

    When he folded up his homework the other day he said he was into oragami. I thought I'd try to find a book at the library about oragami and try to give him some scrap paper to work with this week.

    As silly as it sounds, I really did feel a bit more encouraged after Friday since he was actually talking to me and saying, "no." I can work with communicative, but when a kid just shuts down and turns away from you, that's a bit more challenging.

    I'm thinking that this little guy doesn't have much control or stability over his life. Maybe he sees this read to self time as an opportunity to exert some control and "be in charge." That's no excuse and we're going to have to work on giving him different opportunities to be in control but in thinking more about the situation, this could be a factor.
     
  11. mb_teacher

    mb_teacher Companion

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    Aug 28, 2011

    Definitely get that origami book. Let it be a treat.

    Also, I'm dealing with students whose lives sound a bit like this little man's. My mentor and their past teachers have all said the same thing - establish the caring relationship quickly. It's hard and sometimes, at least for me, it can feel like you tear down a bit of the wall only to have them build it up some more.
    But eventually, you'll make progress. Hang in there!
     
  12. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Aug 28, 2011

    Ok... I have had students like this. What I do is leave them alone. This is his way of showing that he is in control. You cannot make him read. It seems that he has little control in his life from what you are describing. He is showing you that YOU cannot control him. I would instruct the aides that you are trying a little experiment. Do not go over to him during the silent read time. Leave him alone. Allow him to look at pictures or read or sit quietly. But do not go over to him. Do this for 2 days. After 2 days he is going to wonder... why is she not coming over to me? He may even tell you that you forgot him. After 2 days, go over to him and ask would you like to read aloud today? He may or may not concede. But the choice is his now. He is in control. If he says no, keep moving. Wait 2 more days and ask. Usually at that second asking, he will say, yes. Kids who come from difficult home environments often feel out of control. Letting you know that you cannot make him do things is his way of controlling SOMETHING in his life. He may not know where he is spending the night and he cannot control that. But he can control when and to whom he wants to read to. If he says, no at the 2nd asking say, OK and walk away. During his recess, ask him to stay inside a moment with you. When all his peers leave the room, say... I am asking for you to read something for me. Since you do not want to do that during our reading time, I will need to do it during your recess time. Let's do a quick read now so you can go out and play with your friends. Try this if you can. I have worked with many kids with behavioral problems and this usually works. They DO want to go outside and play and will begin reading in class so that they can avoid losing any of their recess time. But do not skip the steps. Acknowledge that he has control of his reading. It will make it seem like you are asking and not trying to make him read. I hope this makes sense.
     
  13. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Aug 28, 2011

    I had a child like this once. He was a fantastic reader, but hated to read aloud. He even had great fluency and expression... it was befuddling, but he also had other behavior issues. In fact, his behavior was so frustrating in other areas, I remember crying about this child and how confusing and challenging he was!

    I would let him be, most of the time. I told him there were time he would have to read aloud, such as the assessments, and everyone did it. I told him as his teacher it was my job to read aloud with him, and we talked about what would seem like a decent amount of time to do it. I don't remember what we agreed to, but it seemed fair to me considering his ability. I just read with everyone else first, and then said, alright T, it's your turn like we agreed.

    It worked. He was a logically minded person and understood it was my job. I left him alone most of the time to just read on his own. He read over 100 books that year and read well above grade level.
     
  14. Toast

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    Aug 28, 2011

    Sounds like you and this little guy have quite the power struggle going on.

    Now, I know that not all kids are the same and different things work on other kids, but this is what worked for me when I had a little guy in 3rd grade last year who would put up a power struggle with MANY things last year, including reading to me for informal assessment.

    I would use humor. I would be silly and try to get him to laugh. I knew that he was bright and good at manipulating adults so that he could be in control.

    So, manipulated back through humor.

    If he was refusing to read I would sit next to him and say something like this. "Oh! Is this what you are reading? The Mouse the Tricycle?" and he would roll his eyes and say "No. The mouse and the motorcycle".

    I would open a page so that both of us could see it and begin reading. Only I would say the words wrong on purpose and he would correct me. Sometimes I would mess up the words so that it said something really goofy and he would just giggle. This helped build that trusting relationship between the two of us and tear down his wall a little bit.

    Finally after all of my "mispronounced" words he would get impatient, take the book away from me and read it "properly" for me to show me what the story really says.

    Is he clever and manipulative? Manipulate back if you can.
     
  15. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    So, to the OP: There are several options that have been presented here, ranging from rebuilding the relationship to humor to a "giving control" approach - I think a number of these - if not all - may be helpful and successful, depending on what is going on in this particular situation. Having read through a few of them, I wanted to add the thought that I would be careful of any situations in which you attempted to exert control or to coerce, such as by stating a consequence or reward that will happen if the child choses to read. I'm definitely not against consequences/rewards, but given the info you've presented, attempting to increase your control over him/the situation at this point could escalate the situation and cause bleed into other areas. Whether through humor, other strategies to rebuild the relationship, or empowering him, I'd focus more on the relationship/empowerment than on expectations/structure/choice.
     
  16. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Aug 28, 2011

    Will he demonstrate to the class the wrong way to read to self?

    Ask him during none Daily time why.

    If it continues and you're sure it's not a reading issue, then follow the school policy on behavior issues.
     
  17. newbie23

    newbie23 Comrade

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    Aug 29, 2011

    UPDATE: This morning I placed a few library books in his book box (and some for other students as well). His books were on origami. During a restroom break I quietly let him know that I had found a few origami books I was excited to share with him and had placed them in his book box. He seemed very nonchalant but during our Read to Self time he was actively engaged in the books. Our literacy coach did a quick walk-through and made sure to stop by to see what he was reading (I had asked her advice on the situation). He seemed to share a bit with her. I'm not sure if he "read" to her or not but at this point, I'm not really concerned with that.

    He was so excited about the books that he wanted to share them with someone he sat close to. She asked to move since it was distracting her. I then asked him if he had found anything he'd like to try to make. As opposed to shutting down, he actually picked out a design and held a short conversation with me on how it could be made. He didn't technically "read" it to me but that's fine with me at this point.

    By no means do I think this situation is resolved but I do have to take some responsibility in the breakdown in communication. I allowed the first day of defiance to really elevate my frustration when I should have walked away and looked at it more objectively. I know that this can be an issue for me at times and I'm still learning when to engage and when to disengage from these power struggles.

    Thanks for all of your advice.
     
  18. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Aug 29, 2011

    Maybe read to him PART of a book so that he must read the rest in order to find out what happens?
     
  19. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    AWESOME job! I think you found a way to discreetly empower him and rebuild your relationship through offering choice and positive interaction. It may not be solved, but sounds like a great step, and hopefully a trend that will continue!
     
  20. newbie23

    newbie23 Comrade

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    Sep 3, 2011

    This week was another rough one at times with this particular student. Work on Writing was introduced this week and the students generally did a great job. This week's we'll be coming up with a list of topics to write on (a whole-class list which will be stapled in each student's writer's notebook so they can add their own ideas as well). I also plan on having a story starter jar that sutdents can pull an idea out of every once in awhile. I think next year I might introduce these earlier but you live and learn.

    So my challenging student would not write. Everytime I walked by he just sat back in his chair and said, "I don't have anything to write about." His obvious defiance was clearly distracting to his classmates so I asked him to come to my desk to write. He was willing but still didn't have any ideas. I tried giving him a few ideas (some even silly ideas to get him to lighten up) to no avail. Finally, I saw a classroom supply catalog and asked if he would go through it and pick out something that he thought we should have in our classroom. Then he could write about it and how we could use it. He seemed ok with this but spent the entire time looking through the catalog. The dismissal bell rang and he got away without writing a word.

    The next day, he pulled the same stunt and started talking to the people at his table. I asked him if he would pick a different seat to sit at. I offered up my desk, a desk off in a corner, the floor, etc. Nope, he shut down and flat out refused to move. Finally, I told him I would be calling his mother and that I'd like him to participate in the phone call. He stomped over to my desk. Unfortunately, I was unable to get ahold of his mom (I still haven't after multiple attempts). He told me that I couldn't make him write if he didn't have an idea of what to write. So I gave him a prompt and said, "you have a choice to write on the prompt, write on whatever you'd like, or write on a refocus sheet (card-turn)." He refused and tore up the refocus sheet but did turn his card.

    The next day he had lunch detention and during that time he wrote the refocus sheet as well as the form required during detention. Yesterday just before work on writing we discussed what we could possibly write about and the students said point blank that sitting and not writing should not be allowed because the more you do that, the more you're going to decide you don't know what to write. I told the students that I'd be writing the entire time as well. I sat two seats behind my "challenge" and wrote in a notebook. I noticed that he kept turning around to see if I was looking at him not writing. I pretended not to notice and kept writing. That went on for a few minutes when finally, HE WROTE! He didn't write a lot and took several breaks to stare around the room but the fact that he put pencil to paper was HUGE.

    Later, I read over his shoulder that he wrote, "I don't like to write but I know that I have to. I know that every day I come to school I'm going to have to write." Ha. Hopefully that means that he'll be following the rules a bit more.

    This week I started a behavior plan with him. He earns points throughout the day for his behavior/effort during specific times (subjects, hallway, restroom, homework, etc.) There are 7 total sections and he can earn 0 (does not meet expectations), 1 (meets expectations), or 2 (exceeds expectations). At this point he must earn 5 points each day in order to put a sticker on his chart (the whole class uses this chart system). He also makes a goal for how many points he wants to have at the end of the week. This week his goal was 20 and he ended up with 22. He's made a goal of 25 for the upcoming week. Each afternoon he comes to me and we dicuss his chart. We go through each section and he tells me what he thinks he should have earned (I've already put the points in). Usually he's right on target and is very honest about whether he should earn the points. Yesterday he got the biggest smile hearing that he beat his goal by 2 points. I could tell that he was proud and is a bit competitive.

    I did make a deal with him yesterday before daily 5 started that if I saw his best effort he'd receive double points. (a little bribery can go a long way).

    I think on Tuesday, I'm going to talk with him and say that I need for him to read to me for 5 minutes sometime during the week. He can choose to do this during Daily 5 but by Friday if he has not read aloud to me, he'll need to use 5 minutes of recess time for this.
     

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