Consequences and Rewards

Discussion in 'Fifth Grade' started by lolabear1, Jun 22, 2008.

  1. lolabear1

    lolabear1 Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2008
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 22, 2008

    I will be teaching fifth grade in the fall as a first year teacher. I student taught in fifth grade so am comfortable with the curriculum, but my cooperating teacher wasn't too big on classroom management.

    I am curious about the consequences and rewards that are typically used in fifth grade. When I ask for behavior management advice, everyone always says "be consistent." Well, I have no idea what I need to be consistent with!

    Also, what do you use to keep track of the behavior? Do you just write names on the board, or do you have some kind of other system?

    Thanks in advance for your help!
     
  2.  
  3. iheart5thgrade

    iheart5thgrade Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 22, 2008

    We're departmentalized at my school, so we have to ALL have the exact same rules/consequences. Each homeroom has a clipboard that they carry to each teacher. If a child talks out in class, doesn't have homework, doesn't pay attention, etc, etc, the teacher marks her letter next to the child's name in that column. (We each have letters, there are six of us and we go from A to F). The homeroom teacher then sees how many conduct marks her homeroom students have. Each mark is one point off their conduct grade. If a student gets two marks in one day, they have silent lunch the next day. If a student gets more than 5 marks in one week, it's an ISS write-up. That's our fifth grade consequences policy.

    For rewards, we use the same policy. If a student can keep a 90 or above in their conduct grade for a nine week period (that means they get fewer than 10 conduct marks in an entire 9 weeks), they have special treats they can buy with their high conduct grade. For example, if a student has a 99 in conduct, she can buy a "buy back a test" pass which means she can give that pass to a teacher where she'd made a bad grade. We also have "sit with a friend passes" and "no homework passes". This system has worked really well. Hope that helps you a little bit.
     
  4. 100%Canadian

    100%Canadian Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    246
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 22, 2008

    For consequences, start with the common things: warnings, notes/phone calls home, detentions etc. Once you get to know your group, then target those areas that will shape them up. I find that athletes will turn things around if their participation in sports gets compromised, for example.

    My school also has a "detention room" but we use that for serious behaviour management. Incomplete homework and small-time behaviour problems should be dealt with by the classroom teacher. When an incident is a little more serious, then we ship them to the "Reflection Room".

    As for rewards, my first weapon is positive feedback. I fear that we're culturing kids to always receive something for doing a task. Nothing irks me more than when a student asks, "So what do I get for winning?". It's becoming an expectation anymore. So, I like to use praise as my primary reward. However, I also give small things for a job well done. This might be a pencil, gel pen, candy, sit with a friend in the next seating plan,whatever. However, I do it randomly so the expectation is never there.

    Again, I think it all comes together the better you know your students. Hope this helps.
     
  5. Calalilys

    Calalilys Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2007
    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 22, 2008

    Here's what I do with my 5th graders:

    Rules (we define what these mean on the 1st day)
    - Be Respectful
    - Be Responsible
    - Be Resourceful
    - Be a Risk-Taker

    Consequence
    - Name on Board = Warning
    - One Check = Silent Lunch (15 minutes - students sit by themselves in the cafeteria and cannot talk to anyone and if they do, they earn another day)
    - Two Checks = Lost of entire recess (15 minutes - students come into the classroom and sit at their seats and if they are caught talking, they earn another day)
    - Three Checks = After-school detention
    - Four Checks = Teacher/student/parent conference to discuss the implementation of a behavior plan.

    Rewards
    - Praise
    - Certificates
    - Tickets (they can turn in their tickets for prizes at the incriments of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50)
    - "Points for _______________" (the entire class will work towards earning points for a special reward - last year they earned a popcorn party, ice cream, donuts and juice)

    A “Behavior Notice” is stapled inside each student's agenda every Monday to keep parents informed as to why they earned the consequences they did each day. The purpose of this form is to make them aware of what their child is doing throughout the day and to identify any patterns in behavior that may be occurring.
     
  6. peachieteachie

    peachieteachie Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 22, 2008

    At my school some of the teachers including myself use an Interruption Chart, similar to the chart mentioned previously. If a student is disrespectful, calls out, does not pay attention, refuses to do work, or any other type of negative behavior they receive a mark on their chart. Each mark represents 2 minutes of owed time, which is usually during lunch or recess. Other consequences I have used include writing 100, 200, or 500 word essays about their behavior, lunch detentions, after-school detentions, phone calls home, or exclusion from certain activities.

    We use a program at my school called CHAMPs, and we expect all students to be CHAMPs. If a student is a CHAMP I reward them by writing a "nice note" home, letting choose a prize out of the prize box, letting them help me around the classroom, giving them extra computer time, etc. I also use a marble jar in my classroom for whole group behavior, and when the marble is full we have some sort of classroom party. I let the students vote on what type of party they would like to have. Last year we had a pizza party, pajama party, rootbeer float party, dance party, and a water balloon fight party.
     
  7. Professor142

    Professor142 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2008
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 23, 2008

    I use a monetary system in my classroom. For good grades, homework turned in, positive behavior, helping other, etc, they receive dollars. When they don't turn in homework, misbehave in class, call out, etc, I take dollars away. They hate losing their dollars that they worked so hard for. They also can buy free time, books, homework off and other positive rewards. The students love and protect their money. I charge them rental for their chairs and desk each month. There is a long list of rewards for their dollars. I have the information on my website for the students and parents to study so their are no surprises.
     
  8. MS Candy

    MS Candy Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2006
    Messages:
    358
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 23, 2008

    I love this! It sounds very organized and cut and dry!
    Oh that would have been great last year!
    I am going to a new school, so I am not sure how it will run...
    I used tickets and fun friday....
    I also gave silent lunch...made phone calls, too!


    I had about 5 students who had "special" issues....so it made it VERY hard!
     
  9. Lynn K.

    Lynn K. Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2007
    Messages:
    803
    Likes Received:
    4

    Jun 24, 2008

    I have used the following rules/rewards/consequences for almost ten years, and I can't imagine switching.

    I post the rules, created by the students, and numbered where everyone can see them. There are usually five rules.

    I keep a clipboard on my desk, and if a student breaks one of the rules, I note the number of the broken rule next to the student's name. Every day starts fresh.

    • A student gets one free warning a day. No one is perfect.
    • Two warnings in the same day (no matter which rule's broken) results in loss of half of recess (10 mins.) the following day. Three warnings mean the student loses the entire recess and must write a note to his parents explaining why.
    • Four results in conferencing with the parent and student.
    • Five (which never happens) means detention. These consequences are also posted so everyone can see them.

    I also reward good behavior by giving each student a mini incentive chart and awarding stickers for correct answers, raising hands if that is difficult for a particular student, or showing coutesy or kindness to others. The best thing about it is I can tailor this to each child. I start out the year handing out a bunch of stickers all day long, but gradually hand out less, so they gain more value. When the charts are full, the students get a trip to the prize box.
     
  10. Teacher Chele

    Teacher Chele Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2007
    Messages:
    991
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 24, 2008

    Professor 142,
    I love your idea! Could you post or PM me the link to your web site? I'd love to hear more about this!!!
     
  11. mickeyln

    mickeyln New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2008
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 24, 2008

    Professor 142 - I agree.. I love this idea as well and would love to check out your website!
     
  12. Calalilys

    Calalilys Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2007
    Messages:
    481
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 25, 2008

    I"d love to see your website, too!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. TnKinder,
  2. Backroads,
  3. nathandev,
  4. sevenplus,
  5. NC Teacher 4,
  6. Ms.Holyoke,
  7. elize4one,
  8. nstructor
Total: 425 (members: 9, guests: 387, robots: 29)
test