Concerns about inclusion class in placement school

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by SF_Giants66, Sep 13, 2014.

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  1. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Sep 14, 2014

    Ask the teacher you are working with. She is the one planning and she knows why she is devoting so much time to it.
     
  2. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    And you will have many more rude awakenings as you student teach.
     
  3. Loveslabs

    Loveslabs Companion

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    I understand part of where you are coming from except substitute math with reading. I read at a very young age. I never learned or understood phonics until I had to teach it. I still struggle with students that have reading issues because it was so easy for me and I don't understand how it can be so hard for someone else.

    As a teacher you can compare yourself to your students but it isn't going to change anything. Instead you need to question how your own experiences might help you better teach your students. You need to work on compassion for those that struggle with what you perceive to be simple. These students are often the hardest to teach, but yet they help us grow as educators.
     
  4. Loveslabs

    Loveslabs Companion

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    And as you teach....even thirty years into your career!
     
  5. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    My gut instinct says that there is something wrong here...I work in a low-income school and a whole class of 8th graders spending a week on adding and subtracting fractions with like denominators does seem unusual. I have worked with certain students who lacked some basic skills, but I have never encountered an entire class. That said, there are classes like this so these students may need to be taught fractions, etc. If they could be challenged more, this is upsetting because they would be falling so behind.

    OP, do the students seem to be struggling with the material that the teacher is teaching? Or are they grasping it rather quickly? Is the teacher performing any checks for understanding?

    I disagree with the idea that student teachers do not know what good teaching is. Even though student teachers may not have as much experience as a teacher with 20 years of experience, it's a good idea to think critically about your observations and think about what the teacher is doing right and what the teacher could improve upon. Just because a teacher is a veteran teacher, it doesn't mean that everything he/she is doing is perfect.
     
  6. SF_Giants66

    SF_Giants66 Cohort

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    Honestly they didn't really seem to be struggling at all with adding and subtracting numbers with decimals. They all moaned when the teacher said they would be doing division because fractions and division are understandably mind numbing for many people, but even when they did it most of them seemed to get the right answer. She only told a few people to double check.


    With her regular class, she only seems to spend two days on one concept with them. I planned a lesson I was going to teach last week, and she apologized that she couldn't have me teach it because they ended up taking longer to get to that unit and said she could stretch the previous concepts out so I could teach it next week instead, but I told her that it wouldn't be necessary for her to take an entire week on two easy lessons prior to mine just to appease me because it would have made the students spend three extra days to review material that they have already mastered, and I wasn't upset that I ended up preparing a lesson that I wasn't going to teach as planned.

    So I do put the students before myself, which is why this class agitates me and throws a red flag out. I just don't think the students are really being challenged.
     
  7. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    So let me throw this out there. Consider it from the teacher's side. How would she BENEFIT from teaching the same thing 6 times in a row? From making 6 different lessons around the same concept with 6 different activities? What reason would she have for doing this, if not for the sake of the students? Why would she WANT to stay teaching the same thing over and over and over again rather than move forward, like she is for her other classes?

    And- what did she say when you asked her, "Why do the students need 6 lessons on this?"
     
  8. pinkrobots27

    pinkrobots27 Rookie

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    :eek:

    Are you positive you want to be a teacher? Because you sound incredibly unemphatic. It sounds like you need a profession that doesn't involve working with people or at least kids since so many are beneath you.

    There are a lot of students who struggle with math. It may be because they're intellectually disabled, have a specific learning disability but do well in other subjects or come from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Regardless, you'll always have struggling students in class.

    I urge you to seek another profession. For someone who speaks of his own struggles on a daily basis, you appear to have little to no ability to put yourself in someone else's shoes. That doesn't make for a good teacher.

    :wow::dizzy:
     
  9. SF_Giants66

    SF_Giants66 Cohort

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    You can urge whatever you like. I don't really think suggesting a profession where someone doesn't have to ever work with people is very sound advice though. It seems as you're just trying to be insulting.
     
  10. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    SF_Giants, I'm wondering, were you always good at math in school? Did it come easily for you, and is that why you chose to be a math teacher? I was always naturally good at school. Most things came pretty easily to me, and even when they didn't, I mastered skills with minimum effort. I was classified gifted, and only ever in classes with students who also learned things quickly. I say all of this not to brag, but because when I entered education it was a huge realization for me that not everyone is smart. Not everyone is average. There are some students who, for a variety of reasons, struggle to be successful in school. I had to change my entire paradigm of how I saw the world because I had been somewhat sheltered. I think this may be what is happening to you.
     
  11. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    SF, in an earlier post you said the students were struggling with decimals and the teacher let them get out their journals. Then you said they didn't seem to be struggling? I'm confused.

    If you want to know why the teacher is teaching her class this way, ask her. I'm willing to bet she has more background knowledge than you do, which is why she's teaching this way. I teach 5th grade. We add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators, but before we do, we spend 3 weeks reviewing adding and subtracting like fractions, equivalent fractions, mixed numbers, etc. All of those are skills they were taught in 4th grade, with solid instruction. Inclusion, on grade level, and gifted students all failed the pre test, which had these skills. Why? Because fractions are complex, and cannot be mastered in two class periods.
     
  12. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Let me put it to you this way...

    I often watch American Idol's opening shows and see some people who lack any bit of singing talent try to perform for the judges. Ultimately, they are heartbroken/frustrated/downright angry at the judges when they are told they need to go in another direction with their lives. I always think it is unfortunate that they weren't told earlier that maybe they needed to pursue some other dream, as singing just isn't what they are cut out for.

    Think of this as me trying to save you from the criticism to come. A job that doesn't deal with people is where you will flourish. This isn't your thing.

    :2cents:
     
  13. olivecoffee

    olivecoffee Companion

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    I'm not sure if this has been said, because I'm two pages behind, but you're going to have to understand that these children do NOT learn how you learn. I'm in my practicum right now and I'm facing challenges because I have to remember every.single.minute that these kiddos don't learn the way I do. My university supervisor told me that this is a problem he sees a lot with student teachers and new teachers.

    I understand that you grasped the concept of fractions with like denominators in one class period, but your kiddos are not you. In fact, it took me quite a while to figure out fractions. If I had a teacher who expected me to understand it in a math period, I'd have been set up for failure. One of the kiddos in my student teaching classroom could not tell me what I could add to 20 to get to 29, but the problem she had to solve was 20 + ____ = 29. She's in third grade. She just isn't there. I know that *I* could look at the number on the left of the equal sign and say, "9," but she isn't me. She needed manipulatives, and even then she struggled.

    Your kiddos will never learn the way you do, and you cannot teach them the way you learn. Please understand that. You'll struggle with this in your practicum. It's something I have to remind myself constantly, especially since I'm teaching rounding. I find myself thinking: WHY DON'T YOU UNDERSTAND!!!! IF IT'S 4 OR LESS, IT STAYS THE SAME!!!!" But I'm an adult. They are not.
     
  14. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Sep 14, 2014

    Or, maybe the poster is just trying to be helpful ... and willing to voice an opinion others (probably) also have about you.
     
  15. pinkrobots27

    pinkrobots27 Rookie

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    No, I'm honestly not. I've seen several of your posts but not being able to think like a student...actually not wanting to..is a big red flag for anyone who wants to teach. You need to anticipate your students mistakes or at the very least be willing to help them even if they don't learn everything in one day like you do.

    Sorry but you can't design your ideal classroom with your ideal subject where every student thinks just like you do. Try to have a little more empathy. It's clear you struggle with things like social skills so one would think you could understand another's difficulties albeit in a different subject.
     
  16. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    I'm not trying to be the least bit rude, but I have to ask you if you think you are headed in the right career path for your talents? You are highly math oriented...maybe engineering would be a better fit?
     
  17. Mr.history

    Mr.history Cohort

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    Last year was my first year teaching. I had inclusion students in a 11th grade US History class that couldn't read. I was blown away as I didnt remember kids like this when I was in high school. This year I have 2-3 students who can barely write their name, but they can listen and answer questions on what they heard/have had read to them.

    Your going to have to get used to this. I personally don't think inclusion is a good model for most students but its the way things are.
     
  18. SF_Giants66

    SF_Giants66 Cohort

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    I think I've made it pretty clear in several previous threads that I'm not switching career paths.


    The inclusion classes are likely due to the special education laws on least restrictive environment. The problem for me wasn't really with teaching kids who struggle with math, but mostly that I just am not buying the fact that this many kids are at this level, and my initial suspicion was that they fudged the IEPs in order to get them into an easy class to keep their school ratings high.

    The students seemed to struggle with the core bites worksheets which were common core warm-ups, but didn't have any struggle with adding and subtracting numbers with decimals, which in reality is no different than adding and subtracting regular numbers and putting a dot in with the number. So I was just having a difficult time believing that there was actually a reason for this other than the school giving these kids a load of crap course disguised as a real math class.
     
  19. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Sep 15, 2014

    Students reach a level like that because they are pushed through the system in an attempt to pass the buck onto the next teacher in line.

    It is very damaging to the students. As you have learned in your education/psychology classes, scaffolding is important to learn new concepts.

    Some empathy wouldn't hurt either.
     
  20. SF_Giants66

    SF_Giants66 Cohort

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    What bothered me is scaffolding is something I didn't observe in this class. As I stated, the teacher didn't seem to even care if the students were even paying attention and retaining any information on a statistics problem she was working out on the board. She didn't even have them practice one on their own after teaching them.

    I just felt if the majority of the students were getting problems from 3 years ago correct, she should have been satisfied and moved onto something else a bit more challenging.

    The kids didn't seem stupid, dim-witted, or lacking intelligent thought, but I just felt the teacher was treating them that way.
     
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