Challenging Chatty Class. Need Advice!

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by englishteach7, Sep 23, 2012.

  1. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Sep 29, 2012

    I love this behavior notebook idea! What do you do if they have already written their name in the behavior notebook during that period, yet they still continue to misbehave? Can they have more than one entry in a day? And what do you do if they flat out refuse to write their name in the notebook?
     
  2. adavant

    adavant Rookie

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    Sep 29, 2012

    I like this behavior notebook idea but I have kids whom I've already given detention so I'm thinking that the order of punishment or how quickly these things can happen would need to be increased for me.
     
  3. teachin4ever

    teachin4ever Cohort

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    Sep 29, 2012

    Yes, they absolutely can have more than one entry per day. Usually once I ask them to put their name in it, their behavior is not an issue for a while. They freak out when they know they might have to explain to mom and dad why their name is in the notebook, so they usually try very hard to avoid getting their name in there more than once.

    I've honestly never had a student flat out refuse to put their name in there. I suppose if that happened, I would send them straight to the office and give them a detention for defiance.
     
  4. adavant

    adavant Rookie

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    Sep 29, 2012

    So . . . if we are JUST starting this behavior notebook how should we start out . . ??
     
  5. teachin4ever

    teachin4ever Cohort

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    Sep 29, 2012

    I guess you could tweak it however you want to best suit your classroom and students. Mine has been in place since the beginning of the year so students know that they get a warning first, parents notified next, detention third and a conference with the principal last. Since you mentioned you already gave out detentions, I'm not sure how you would want to get it started. You could always do it the same way and just explain to the students that this is how discipline issues will be handled in the classroom from now on.
     
  6. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Sep 29, 2012


    I like your use of "proximity" to disrupt the disruptors. It's in alignment with what Fred Jones found when he spent two decades in classrooms observing teachers to find out why some work so hard at discipline and others make it look easy. For the cost of taking a few steps a teacher can avoid the extra duties associated with keeping track, reporting and other clerical tasks. This brings up another topic probably for another time: To be of use to a teacher a discipline technique should be affordable. It should ultimately reduce the teacher's workload. -FJ

    Consider having students go to the board to write for you. Often the brighter students finish first and have better penmanship than the teacher.
     
  7. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Sep 29, 2012

    Thanks! I teach inclusion, and I have all of my SPED students together for 30 minutes a day in an intervention period. In their core classes, they chat but it's nothing extreme. In my intervention period, they are with all of the kids they used to be together with in resource, so they know exactly how to push each others buttons and get everyone off task. I've tried rewards (candy, brownies, pride cards from our school wide PBS system), but it's not working. The behavior notebook sounds like the perfect system....simple, manageable consequences and a built in data collection system! Thanks for sharing your idea with us :)
     
  8. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    Sep 29, 2012

    My middle school classes averaged 35-45 students each, and the biggest classes, naturally, had the worst troublemakers in them.

    An older teacher gave me this advice, which worked beautifully:

    Tell the students that you would like for the smarter, more serious students, the ones who want to learn, to sit in the front, and the ones who didn't fit that category should sit in the back.

    Then speak VERY softly, so anyone who wants to really hear you will have to be quiet and work for it.

    After a few days, start showering the good kids with rewards and encourage them to eat/drink/play/etc. with those rewards right there in the class in front of the other kids. No sharing allowed.

    Finally, plan an awesome field trip which must be earned, and stack it so only those students who genuinely earn it can go. Leave a ton of seatwork with the sub, for the kids who didn't earn the trip.

    It's amazing what a little magic can do for reluctant learners. Plus, you're rewarding your good kids and helping them soar and learn and experience the universe, instead of requiring them to sit and wait and wait and mingle and endure disruptive behaviors and wait some more.

    Once you begin, you can't stop or be lenient. Most students learn fast. Some, of course, won't put out even that much effort. Your main responsibility is to your hardworking, sincere students who want to be in school and who have wished for years that they could sit unmolested and use their wings.

    In a perfect world? Make your classroom a tiny perfect world. If a parent complains, explain to them that ALL students have the exact same chance and you're sorry Junior wasn't interested but tomorrow that chance will still be there if he CHOOSES to take it.

    It also helps when you lean in and whisper something and then all the good kids laugh.

    Some of you will think this is terrible - those poor kids in the back and all. Life is full of choices. Choose wisely and the universe will open up and show you all its wonders. Choose to be a tool and the universe will laugh at you.

    Then again, I'm overly strict and love to model abusive behaviors. . . .
     
  9. teachin4ever

    teachin4ever Cohort

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    Of course!! Glad it's going to work out for you! :)
     
  10. funnyface07

    funnyface07 Rookie

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    Oct 6, 2012

    As someone who has horrible classes last year, I just have to say that I LOVE this idea!!!!!
     
  11. Furthuron

    Furthuron Companion

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    Oct 9, 2012

    I love all these ideas! I have found that having packets works well for difficult transitions. For the most recent unit I did (an essay), all the materials were in a packet (16 pages long), and I passed them out while the kids were doing their warm-ups and collected them at the end of the period. I made acceptions for some students who were gone for ISP or sick, but mostly they stayed in the class. In my difficult class, I still had a tough time with management, but the packet smoothed out a lot of wrinkles.
     
  12. PolarBear

    PolarBear Rookie

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    Oct 17, 2012

    I really like this idea. :thumb:
     
  13. Cheesehead16

    Cheesehead16 New Member

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    Dec 10, 2012

    A Chatty Group of 30 Grade Eights

    Thank you so much. I recently put my grade 8's in groups and the result was terrible. They easily make eye contact (especially in our small, cramped classroom as desks are so close together with so many large bodies) and chat excessively. I am putting them back in rows and am excited to try this notebook idea out tomorrow.

    If anyone has tweaked this for transition times, let me know??
     
  14. jamoehope

    jamoehope Companion

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    Dec 17, 2012

    I'm considering using this behavior notebook idea. I like it. But I would shorten the time from two times per quarter to two times per week or two times per every two weeks. Not sure yet. I'm going to be working with special education 8th graders and I think going a whole quarter would be setting them up to fail. :unsure:
     

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