CBEST writing deadline

Discussion in 'Basic Skills Tests' started by DadaSur, Jan 12, 2018.

  1. DadaSur

    DadaSur New Member

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    Jan 12, 2018

    Hello,
    I passed math (47) and reading (45) several months ago. I had already made a couple attempts at writing and got only 26 points.
    I moved to the US two years ago. Although I teach art in private school in SF, it is still a big challenge for me to pass the testing process. Alike the most of foreigners, my speaking English skills much better than writing. I have problems with structure, usage, and spelling. I use spell check in my everyday life to avoid mistakes in my texts because learning all writing skills takes a long time. Certainly, the test is much easier for native speakers. Others should practice it a long time to get the required level of usage. So It looks like I need much more time to get it all and be ready for the next attempt. I just wonder if I have any deadline to pass the CBEST section when I have already passed two others? If there any focal point when all my score would burn and I would need to start all sections again?
    How much time do I have to pass the writing section of the CBEST?

    Thank you!
    Dasha
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2018
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  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jan 12, 2018

    Subject-matter scores (CSET) have a five- or ten-year shelf life, but CBEST scores are good forever.

    What have you been doing to prepare for CBEST writing?
     
  4. DadaSur

    DadaSur New Member

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    Jan 12, 2018

    Thank you for the prompt answer! These are great news) No anxiety anymore!

    I wrote millions of essays for my tutor, exercised with Murphy book, and read about teaching.

    I had 80 minutes to write both essays in the first attempt. However, my first trial results are better than the second, when I had 5 hours to complete texts.

    From your forum, I found out about the Writing Skills success in Twenty Minutes a Day book. So I exercise with it. Moreover, I decided to switch off spellchecks.

    Let me know If you have anything else useful in your mind.

    D
     
  5. DadaSur

    DadaSur New Member

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    Jan 12, 2018

    hank you for the prompt answer! These are great news) No anxiety anymore!

    I wrote millions of essays for my tutor, exercised with Murphy book, and read about teaching.

    I had 80 minutes to write both essays in the first attempt. However, my first trial results are better than the second, when I had 5 hours to complete texts.

    From your forum, I found out about the Writing Skills success in Twenty Minutes a Day book. So I exercise with it. Moreover, I decided to switch off spellchecks.

    Let me know If you have anything else useful in your mind.
     
  6. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jan 12, 2018

    Keep using spell check - but instead of letting spell check insert the correction for you, take the time to type it yourself. You could even write a whole (short!) essay with spell check turned off as you type, then have spell check and grammar check go over the whole thing all at once, and look at the explanations. Look for patterns in what you're getting wrong, and focus on those.

    Read a couple paragraphs of well-written art commentary that is intended for a general audience. Copy them out word for word. Read them aloud - in fact, act them out a little. Then see if you can rewrite the paragraphs from memory. Grammar-check your results. Rewrite the passage and grammar-check your results. In the process, you may find some phrasings that you really like; feel free to incorporate them into your own writing.

    (And read a lot of well-written art commentary, period. Reading can improve writing, especially when one reads good writing and pays attention to the writing. Since you know the subject matter, you're not having to spend time figuring it out, so you and your brain can focus on the language.)

    Using English, www.usingenglish.com, is tailored to English learners and offers up some fine explanations of grammatical points; there's even a tool into which you can paste sentences for checking.

    My second-favorite book on English spelling happens to be written for middle-school students, though it's not often obvious, and I know a number of adults who've found it very useful. The book is Painless Spelling, published by Barrons, and any big bookstore should have it. You could try the companion book Painless Grammar as well.

    Do all of this not just because it will enable you to pass CBEST but because it will help your grasp of English and your ability to communicate. (This is advice for all test takers, by the way.)

    In what language did you learn art? If it was English, in what language were you educated?
     

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