Casey Anthony Trial

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Teach'em, Jun 7, 2011.

  1. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Jul 6, 2011

    And how do you know that action isn't taking place inside those houses with the porch lights on? Maybe a mother is online searching for a safe house for her and her child. Maybe a father is finding a shelter to donate to. Perhaps a couple is looking at foster care. And a neighbor asks why the lights are on, and conversation begins.

    Maybe, just maybe, one or two or ten or a hundred kids will be safer because someone turned on CNN, or logged in to facebook, or atoz, or left their porch light on.

    Or would it be preferable to leave the lights off? I don't know how we'll ever know.
     
  2. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jul 6, 2011

    You're right, back in 2008 I followed it through the media. Since I am in Mexico and do not have the news channels you guys have back in the states, I have not heard anything through the media since being here, but watched the trial as it aired, or replayed in the evening, without media views or opinions. I think there was enough evidence presented in the trial to convict Casey, and this is based on the trial, not on the media's representation of the trial.

    I was not the only one who watched the trial, many others did. So, to say that opinions are based on something we were not privy to is false. The trial was public.
     
  3. Mrs.SLF

    Mrs.SLF Comrade

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    Jul 6, 2011

    Except none of us were in the jury room and given instructions by the judge about to proceed with regards to the law and this case. And a side note, the media convicted her in 2008 which was kind of my point about the media coverage of the case. I still believe cameras should have been banned in the courtroom. Judges do it all of the time.
     
  4. Mrs.SLF

    Mrs.SLF Comrade

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    Jul 6, 2011

    But that wasn't the premise of the Porch Light campaign, it was done to remember the girl who died 3 years ago because people were angry about the outcome of an overly sensationalized case. In fact, the facebook page only states that people turn on their porch lights at 9 pm, regardless of time zone. That's just not my interpretation of a call to action.
     
  5. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jul 6, 2011

    The judge read the rules and how to proceed live to the jury, so unless there was another time he discussed it with them that wasn't aired, we were privy to that as well.

    The media might have convicted her back in 2008, and I would agree with that, but that doesn't diminish the large amount of evidence presented during trial that really was enough to convict her.

    Whether or not cameras should or shouldn't have been permitted during trial is irrelevant at this point because they were permitted, and we were made privy to the entire case. Therefore, we who watched the trial have enough information to base a decision.
     
  6. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jul 6, 2011

    If one is satisfied with turning on a porch light in Caylee's memory, then let him or her do so. If another feels called to do something else, let him or her do whatever it is he or she is called to do.
     
  7. Mrs.SLF

    Mrs.SLF Comrade

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    Jul 6, 2011

    Except none of us were in the jury deliberations. None of us. And evidence that is completely circumstanial is not an overwhelming amount of evidence. Hence why they couldn't find her guilty. If you want to direct to some displeasure toward someone about this, look to the state for failing to prove their case.
     
  8. Mrs.SLF

    Mrs.SLF Comrade

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    Jul 6, 2011

    And no one said they couldn't but it might be productive to do something, well, productive.
     
  9. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jul 6, 2011

    I felt the state did a great job and proved Casey guilty, hence my shock at the verdict.
     
  10. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jul 6, 2011

    What might not seem productive or meaningful to one might very well seem productive and meaningful to another.
     
  11. Mrs.SLF

    Mrs.SLF Comrade

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    Jul 6, 2011

    Um, okay. If you say so but you weren't on the jury and they didn't feel there was enough evidence. I, mean, there is still no cause of death (which means they cannot even prove she was technically murdered-and know that I am not defending Casey Anthony or saying Caylee wasn't murdered because I honestly don't know) or DNA evidence. Doesn't seem like a lot of evidence to me.

    There is a difference between productive and meaningful. Turning on a porch light is not really productive. Like, at all. I didn't say turning your light on for the girl to remember her wasn't meaningful to someone, it's just not a call to action.
     
  12. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Jul 6, 2011

    How many kids would have to be living in a safer environment to make the porch light thing "productive"? One? Two? Ten? A hundred? Thousand?

    Don't turn your porch lights on if you don't want to. Go do something else. I didn't have mine on, mostly because no one would see them. But don't criticize or minimize those who do because you think it's not good enough.

    Go find someone who did the recent Light the Night and tell them that walking around in the dark holding candles isn't going to cure cancer. Go tell my friend who has wore a yellow ribbon every day since 2008, and given up candy as her own personal sacrifice while her nephew is deployed that it isn't good enough.

    Everyone has something that they can do to help a cause. Some give money, some give blood, some wear a ribbon, some turn their lights on. Who are you, me, or anyone else to judge what is enough?
     
  13. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jul 6, 2011

    Remembering someone isn't necessarily not productive, especially if the act of remembrance is the goal.
     
  14. Mrs.SLF

    Mrs.SLF Comrade

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    Jul 6, 2011

    Unfortunately, I'll probably never find turning on a porch light as productive. Just my opinion, which I am completely entitled to regardless if I am in the minority with my opinion. Do tell me if turning a porch light helped bring back Caylee three years after she died/was murdererd? And the Light the Night didn't simply culminate in lighting candles and walking but it was also a fundraiser for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Not really the same as turning on the porch light because unhappy with the verdict in a case that none of us were a part of. :2cents:
    I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree on this one.
     
  15. BettyRubble

    BettyRubble Rookie

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    Jul 6, 2011

    If Casey didn't kill Caylee, then who did? That would be my question.

    I don't see how the porch light thing is bad. We lost a student at school and on his birthday and the anniversary of his death the students all wore ribbons in his honor. I see this as something similar. What's the harm?
     
  16. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jul 6, 2011

    All the evidence points to Casey. The smell of human decomposition in her car, the body being found close to the house, the lies, not reporting that the "accident", and her odd behavior during the time her daughter was gone. Then, the duct tape found on the skull just proves that it was a homicide. Why would someone place duct tape on a child if the child accidentally drowned? So, the only lingering questions one might have is how exactly did Casey kill her? All the evidence, however, points to Casey as Caylee's murderer.
     
  17. Mrs.SLF

    Mrs.SLF Comrade

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    Jul 6, 2011

    I think I'm going to wash my hands of this thread because it's like going around in a circle and hoping you'll somehow make it out. Have a lovely day, everyone!

    :)
     
  18. BettyRubble

    BettyRubble Rookie

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    Jul 6, 2011

    I agree with you. I can see the jury's point of view of there being enough reasonable doubt to not convict her but it just makes me ill. I sincerely hope her comment about wanting to get pregnant again does not come to fruition. She does not deserve to be a mother.
     
  19. Good Doobie

    Good Doobie Rookie

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    Jul 6, 2011

    I think the jury made the right decision. I didn't watch the trial, but saw bits and pieces on the news, so I might not have all my facts straight. I personally was shocked that she would be partying, living-it up at a time when it seems she should have been worried about her daughter. But without at least a smoking-gun, I think the jury made the right decision. I think it would be wrong to jail someone for murder if they were innocent of the crime. Society would be at fault and would bear the blame for being wrongfully judgemental.
     
  20. CocoC

    CocoC Guest

    Jul 6, 2011

    IMVHO, reasonable doubt became doubt beyond reason.
     

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