Best way to start a teacher/parent conference.

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by PEteacher07, Jan 29, 2019.

  1. PEteacher07

    PEteacher07 Cohort

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    Jan 29, 2019

    I have a first grade student and his classroom teacher and myself (the PE teacher) want to have conference concerning his behavior which is inappropriate. There are good qualities about the child. He is very bright and has a lot of potential. But he will not stop talking, doesn't follow directions, and doesn't keep his hands to himself despite many conversations, citizenship folder notes, sitting in timeout for a bit, etc.

    What are some positive conversation starters so we can talk about what we like about the child but also address the elephant in the room which is his behavior. I want this to be a productive and positive experience.
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Feb 3, 2019

    Thanks so much for coming in today. Little Johnny is so bright and has a lot of potential. (Maybe a few more things here...he’s a great reader, he loves xyz in gym class, etc) We are finding that some behaviors we are noticing are hampering Little Johnny from doing his best. We’d like to work in a positive way as a team with you at home to help little Johnny Reach his potential as we all believe he can. Here’s what we were thinking.....
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2019
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  4. CDOR79

    CDOR79 Comrade

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    Feb 3, 2019

    Just like czacza said, always begin with appreciation for what they did (coming in, sending an email, etc) followed by something positive!
     
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  5. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Feb 3, 2019

    As always, greet and thank the parent for coming. Start with letting the parent know that you want to work as a team to grow the skills her child has, as well as, improve the skills her child struggles with. Make sure you concrete examples of anything you discuss. Beliefs, opinions, vague examples, and asserting motives tends to detract from the conversation. Be factual and honest. If her child is talking a lot but is not the only one, make sure she knows that it is something you are working on for more than just her child. No names, of course, but allowing her to know that you are aware it isn't just her child that you are working with will deflect from her believing you are singling out her child because I am sure her child has said others are talking too, if that is the case.

    You have to genuinely show with examples of how you plan to help her child learn the skills he needs to learn and improve upon what he has and the why behind what you will do. You may also have to discuss that what may work at home with one child doesn't work the same way in a group. Also, really listen to what the parent has to say. They know the emotional reaction they get from their child. Sticks don't work for some children, carrots don't work for others, and sometimes a parent has yet to find what does work for that child. Assume the parent is doing the best she can. Those that show usually are even when it isn't successful just as you are trying your best even though it isn't successful as of yet.
     
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  6. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Fanatic

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    Feb 3, 2019

    Excellent advice!
     
  7. 3Sons

    3Sons Connoisseur

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    Feb 4, 2019

    Excellent advice. I'd stress that the positive points need to be presented authentically. Don't invent things, don't mention things that you personally don't feel are that important. Parents aren't (generally) stupid; they'll know it's a technique. This doesn't mean parents won't appreciate the honest effort, but a dishonest bit of tripe WILL be resented.

    If there's really nothing you can say that's positive and genuine, then don't. A forced and false effort will come out badly and parents will trust you less. Focus more on how YOU'RE having difficulty getting him to focus, refrain from hitting his classmates, whatever. If this is really the case, though, you should also look deeply inward at why you can't genuinely express a positive.
     
  8. Aces

    Aces Cohort

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    Feb 4, 2019

    Thank you for coming today, I really appreciate your time and understand that you have a very busy schedule. First of all Johnny is doing xyz well in class. He has a firm understanding of these concepts. But I do have some concerns about his behavior in class, which is why I've asked you come in today so that we can come up with a plan to get his behavior back on track with classroom expectations. I'd like to provide you a copy of our classroom expectations, just for you to have as a reference. (Give a copy even if you gave one at the beginning of the year/semester. That way they can't say you didn't). Then go into the details of the game plan.
     

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