Best Classroom Management Books

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ms.Holyoke, Oct 31, 2017.

  1. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Comrade

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    Oct 31, 2017

    I am starting my student teaching semester in January. I am doing my pre-practicum in the same class--an 8th grade math class in an urban school. Right now, there are some classroom management issues like not raising hands, talking while other people are talking, etc. The issues get worse at the end of the day with lots of distractions during teaching time. Can anyone recommend good books on Classroom Management that I should read before I start student teaching? Thanks!!
     
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  3. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Dream Class by Michael Linsin, and the Classroom Management Secret by the same author.

    Teaching with Love and Logic is a really good one too.
     
  4. K-5_teacherguy

    K-5_teacherguy Companion

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  5. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Comrade

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    Thanks! What is Dream Class about? Which book would you recommend more out of the two? We are going to read Love and Logic for my classroom management class.
     
  6. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Comrade

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    I read through some of these and this is amazing!! Thank you so much.
     
  7. viola_x_wittrockiana

    viola_x_wittrockiana Companion

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    For that demographic, "Teaching Difficult Students: Blue Jays in the Classroom". It's basically about using students' strengths and behaviors to your advantage. The core premise is based on the whole thing about a seed falling one place is a flower and the same seed somewhere else is a weed. We can't always change our "weed" students, but we can change the environment where they grow.
     
  8. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Comrade

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    Thank you! My situation right now is that I have 3 boys in one class and a few boys in another class who are a constant disruption to the class when both my mentor teacher is teaching and when I am teaching. My mentor teacher takes a different approach than I would and often does not address the behavior at all. I know that these these students also struggle academically which may cause some of these disruptions. But even when it is something like taking notes (requires no effort at all), they are turning around, making faces at each other, yelling across the room. I was surprised because my mentor teacher said that this day went better than usual and she gave the whole class points for getting through the notes. As a teacher, I can project my voice but I can't talk over these disruptions and it is not fair to the other students but I am really trying to be empathetic to these students. I realized that all of the students in this class, even the ones who cause these disruptions, want to do well and will work if you sit with them. But I'm at a bit of a loss for what to do during whole group instruction. She uses incentive systems but I really don't like them for 8th grade and I hope to have other strategies as well.
     
  9. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Fanatic

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    Discipline without Stress, Punishments, or Rewards by Dr. Marvin Marshall is very good. If you are more in a hurry to implement something with more structure than I would go with Tools For Teaching by Fred Jones.

    8th grade is as challenging as any grade can be with classroom management. It is also a bit complicated. I would recommend reading at least 2 books to prepare for that.
     
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  10. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Comrade

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    Thank you! I think I am looking for strategies that I can use while I am student teaching. So I can't really re-make the behavior system but I want something I can use everyday. The whole class (not just the boys) has issues with not having side conversations during teaching time which I anticipate will be a struggle as well.
     
  11. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Comrade

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    Not sure what you mean by this?
     
  12. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Dream Class was his first book in general about classroom management. I think I would only recommend that one more because it was the first I read, and I feel I got more out of it. The Classroom Management Secret is a lot of review of what's in Dream Class, so I felt like I read a lot of it before. However if you're reading it for the first time, the Classroom Management Secret might be more polished as it is his second book.
     
  13. Obadiah

    Obadiah Habitué

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    In alphabetical order, but I starred the two books I'd most recommend.

    Kohn, Alfie. Punished by Rewards: The Trouble with Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A’s Praise, and other Bribes. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1993 (I might not apply his philosophy as strictly as he does, but overall, he provides excellent insight. I'd recommend critically reading his research anecdotes; the problem with research is that it's mostly done within a specialized environment rather than the natural environment of a regular classroom. No matter how careful the researcher is, there could always be at least one differing factor that could skew the results; a common example is, when the teacher is aware that research is occurring, s/he might unconsciously behave just a bit differently and that little bit of difference can effect the experiment).

    * Levine, Mel. A Mind at a Time. NY: Simon and Schuster, 2002. Read July 1016. (Highly recommended, especially the 2002 book! Your comment on note taking being an effortless task, you will find that this isn't always the case. What seems effortless to an adult is sometimes an amazing struggle for a 13-yr.-old: it could be a struggle with pen manipulation, attention, working independently within an interpersonal context....the list goes on. A quick commendation: you are highly observant, an excellent quality for a teacher)!

    Levine, Mel. The Myth of Laziness. N.Y.: Simon & Schuster, 2003

    Pillay, Srini. Tinker Dabble Doodle Try. N.Y.: Ballantine Books, 2017 (The allowances made by your mentor teacher, especially the face making, might be her way of allowing a brain break. Personally, I wouldn't allow loud disruptions or constant chatter; I might allow an occasional whisper--depends).

    Robinson, Ken. Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution that‘s Transforming Education. (No city listed): Viking, 2015 (I read a pre-sale copy from a book give-away, which is why I don't know the publisher's city).

    * Siegel, Daniel J. and Tina Payne Bryson. No-Drama Discipline: The Whole-Brain Way to Calm the Chaos and Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind. New York: Bantam, 2014. E-book ISBN is 978-0-345-54805-4 (Best book I've ever read on this topic! It deals mostly with young children, but the ideas apply to all ages. It is written mainly for parents, but as the authors mention in the introduction, it is certainly applicable to classroom situations, also).

    Walker, Timothy D. Teach Like Finland: 33 Simple Strategies for Joyful Classrooms. N.Y.: W. W. Norton & Co., 2017 (Just read this book. Wow! Mr. Walker's observations are quite insightful and applicable to American classrooms. I especially appreciated his comments on respecting students, not being a helicopter teacher (to borrow a current American catch-phrase), and allowing students to do most of the work rather than the teacher just talk-talk-talking all period--the question often arises in education, are teachers a sage on a stage or a guide on the side)?
     
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  14. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Comrade

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    Nov 12, 2017

    This is so true--thank you for this perspective. I was thinking of note-taking as something that does not require much critical thinking, but I understand how it can be a challenging skill for some student. I have recently learned the one of the students who does not behave appropriately most days and affects the behavior of other kids has ADHD and his parents do not want him to take medication. This makes sense why note taking is so hard for him. He does better when an adult works with him individually. I worked with him on a science project and he was focused the whole time, really respectful, and did a great job.
     
  15. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Building Classroom Discipline by CM Charles is a good start because it dedicates a chapter each to a variety of different methods. From there, you could choose a follow up book/resource based on what appeals to you most. As professionals, I think we have the obligation to learn foundations and truly understand what's out there before we dive into a particular method before we understand its theoretical context.
     
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