Bell to Bell Teaching and Homework Questions

Discussion in 'High School' started by notalawyer2010, Mar 7, 2012.

  1. notalawyer2010

    notalawyer2010 Rookie

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    Mar 9, 2012

    That is what they won't do. If they don't finish before forty-five after they just give up. I may just cover the clock.

    Other than having them finish what was started in class the other2 assignments are weekly.
     
  2. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    Mar 9, 2012

    But this will stress finishing on time, so the quality of work will be lower. They will only worry about getting done on time. I thought you wanted quality work?
    I don't think it's fair to punish kids who don't finish on time by having them be tardy to their next class. Our passing periods are only 5 minutes, but if you are walking from one end of the school to the other, then you need the whole five minutes because of the crowd. If I ever need to keep a student after class, even if it is for misbehavior, I always offer to write a pass in case they are a little bit late to their next class.
    I would not recommend exit slips in high school.
     
  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Mar 9, 2012

    I guess the ultimate answer is that you will have to come up with another way to assess the skills you want mastered that will work around your current issues. I don't have a clue what might work for you in high school, but, someone here might.
     
  4. Silmarienne

    Silmarienne Cohort

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    Mar 29, 2012

    Since I'm switching to HS next year, I am reading these posts with interest. I also managed to observe some HS classes and pick the brains of the teachers briefly.

    It seems like a lot of it boils down to making your expectations clear and enforcing them with what one teacher called "force of personality" (i.e., the "glare" Chebrutta referred to, or the up-to-the-bell teaching others insist on).

    It seems like closure activities would be good if there is extra time, but as a daily thing some of the kids will just view it as fool-around time. And I wouldn't want to keep them after-- they have enough time pressure as it is (I have a daughter who is a junior and she complained to me that when it's "that time of the month" she doesn't find the 4 minutes they get to be enough; and having to tell a male teacher that she was late because of having to address that is a horrible embarrassment for a teenage girl).

    Someone did mention circulating around the room. I teach K and find that to be very effective. I find some kids not doing the work because (1) they don't really understand what to do, (2) they are distracted by other children, usually the bright ones who can talk and work at the same time, or (3) some don't know how to organize themselves to get started. A little help getting them started or re-focused is all it takes. And they know I'm going to look at their work before they're finished.

    Hope something there helps! :)
     
  5. KateL

    KateL Habitué

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    Mar 30, 2012

    At my school, we are expected to do closure activities. I got dinged on my first evaluation this year because I just taught until the bell rang. So now I have the students answer a question or write a paragraph during the last 5-10 minutes of class. They write 4 on one page, and then I collect the paper for a grade. If they don't finish on one day, I post the prompts on the class website so that they can complete them on their own time. Students who are absent also have to complete them. Most of the students do them, and it has made a difference in the students' understanding. Apparently, before I started doing this, some of the students would take notes and look like they were paying attention, but when I had them do the summary activity, they had no idea what to answer. Now, they know the summary is coming, so they pay better attention during class.
     
  6. Silmarienne

    Silmarienne Cohort

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    Mar 31, 2012

    They write 4 what?

    The way you are doing it sounds very beneficial, KateL.
     
  7. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    Jan 10, 2013

    We are required to have bellwork (opening question) and an exit slip. Typically an exit slip is designed to review what they learned, it can be answering a MC or a short response. The bellwork is like an anticipation-will revolve around what you are going to discuss. You create your lesson to fit into the 5-7 minutes of bellwork and exit slip. It is told to us that both should not take more than the first 5 minutes/last 5 minutes. My students get their exit slip and are finishing it and walking out the door as the bell rings.
    They are used to it and most will actually ask me if we have one. I always have the one or two that does neither, but this year I give points for doing it. They put them in a composition book and at the end of each week I check the books (real quick with a stamp) and then at the end of the 9 weeks I add up their scores and they get a grade, for me its added into their Participation grade or notebook grade.
     

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