Being forced to resign...need help with new applications!

Discussion in 'General Education' started by purpleteacher4, Feb 6, 2017.

  1. purpleteacher4

    purpleteacher4 New Member

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    Feb 6, 2017

    HELP! I am basically being forced to resign in order to not have a "non-contract renewal" next to my name on my record. (It is a VERY long story as to why I'm basically positive my contract won't be renewed, but I have no actual confirmation of that.) I'm working on applications to new districts hoping to have a job before I resign and I don't know what to put on the "Why did you resign from your previous position?" question. It is basically because I have had little to NO support this school year, and I'm brand new to a grade level that is much different than the one I taught in last year. My team leader makes my life a living nightmare and my principal constantly tells me what to improve on, but never gives me help and tells me how to go about making those improvements. Also, my school is not departmentalized for upper elementary grades (3-5) except for 5th grade it planning ALL of that is so hard (especially with no support). Any suggestions on how to answer that question?

    Also, does anyone have any suggestions on when I should resign by or if I should? I don't know when all contract renewals go out, but I know that some have gone out to other staff members. I obviously don't want to resign without another job lined up, but the chances of that happening are very slim considering the time of year. But not resigning early enough has me run the risk of not having my contract renewed. Any advice is much appreciated!
     
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  3. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Feb 6, 2017

    If you're sure (or even "pretty sure") your contract won't be renewed, I would resign ASAP. If you wait until you're given official notice, even if you resign instead you'll have to check the box on applications that says, "Have you every resigned in lieu of non-renewal," which is pretty much the exact same thing as having to check the box that says you were non-renewed. If you resign before you're told you're being non-renewed, you can answer "no" to both of those questions. If other staff members are being told, I wouldn't wait another day. Non-renewal is a career killer around here.

    Last time I was job searching I was leaving an absolutely horrible, toxic school. On applications that jut asked you to list your work history and then said "reason for leaving," I kind of cheated and said "still employed at this school" (technically true, although perhaps not answering the "spirit" of the question). I got tons of interviews and was never asked about it. If the question was more specific, like why do you want to leave your current school, I just put "not a good fit." In most interviews I wasn't asked about it. When I was, I talked about the wonderful collaborative nature of my first school (terrible school was my 2nd) and said I was looking to get back into an environment like that. Never, ever bash your current school in an interview. Even if it is a truly awful place, it ends up just reflecting poorly on you. Don't say anything unless directly asked, and if directly asked be as positive as possible in your answer.
     
  4. purpleteacher4

    purpleteacher4 New Member

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    Feb 6, 2017

    So, it is okay for me to resign without ANYTHING lined up for next year at all?

     
  5. TeacherCuriousExplore

    TeacherCuriousExplore Comrade

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    Feb 6, 2017

    If I was in a situation like that I would not put that on my resume or on an application. Employers do not need to know everything. If you feel that your job did not give you the support for you to implement best practices then that shows that you were not in the wrong. If employers find out that you resigned from a school that you did not put on your resume then you tell them the truth. At least they can not fire you because by that time you'll probably be hired into the district and doing really well.
     
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  6. justwanttoteach

    justwanttoteach Cohort

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    Feb 6, 2017

    I was in this situation last year. I resigned effective the last day of school for the year. As others stated, I resigned as soon as possible. I also made a point not to tell any students or other teachers. It just makes things confusing. I was able to get interviews and to land a better job in an awesome district. I did like others did. I said I was still employed as I applied for jobs for this year. I made sure to find someone on Admin staff to get a letter of recommendation. I asked them for things to improve and didnt miss a day of work from the day I resigned to the last day of school. I did my very best to walk out of the campus leaving bridges and what little support still in tact. It was scary and overwhelming but things worked out! Good luck!
     
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  7. purpleteacher4

    purpleteacher4 New Member

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    Feb 6, 2017

    It is SO scary and VERY overwhelming! So, if I were to resign this week or next, and I have already scheduled a personal day for the next week, should I cancel it and still work that day? I put in for this day to be off about a month in advance. Would you say that I should risk going ahead and resigning without having a job lined up yet?

     
  8. MrTempest

    MrTempest Companion

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    Feb 7, 2017

    I have posted this response in the past and thought it may be appropriate here.

    The way I see it is that there should be a clear distinction between a non-renewal of a probationary teacher and that of a tenured teacher. If a probationary teacher can be let go without cause or the right to due process, he or she should not be put in the same boat as a teacher who was not renewed for a reason that could have amounted to a loss of license or committing something illegal. Under the rules of tenure it is assumed that you do not have the right to a renewal during a probationary period, that being the case I see no good reason why a non-tenured teacher who was non-renewal without cause should be obligated to acknowledge the non-renewal on an application.
     
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  9. otterpop

    otterpop Fanatic

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    Feb 7, 2017

    I think you should resign ASAP. You don't want "resigned in lieu of non-renewal" following you around as you job search.
     
  10. vickilyn

    vickilyn Maven

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    Feb 9, 2017

    I would want to know a couple of things. Are teaching jobs in your preferred grade placement hard to come by? That would influence my answer. You have asked multiple times about resigning without a replacement job waiting for you, which sounds like finances matter. Can you survive without unemployment insurance payments if a new job is not available? Is the different grade level you are teaching this year in the same district as the year before, but at a different school in the same district? If so, you really can't just leave it off your resume without also leaving off the good year. If this is your second year, that will mean you would be no more hireable than a new graduate, since you just wiped out your experience. Should you decide to resign, the standard answer is that the (second) school was a poor fit, which allows you to tell more of the positives from year #1. Only you know how hard it is to get/land a new job in your locale. If jobs are scarce, then you are going to want to claim that good year's experience, to make you a better candidate. The second year can be the "poor fit" experience. It would, of course, help if you had letters of recommendation from the first wonderful year to substantiate your explanation that it was a wonderful year.

    You have to do what works for you. Resigning effective the end of the school year should not affect your salary/entitlements for this year - you are still working, just with an end in sight. You should ask specifically about that personal day if you choose to resign, since you don't want to give anyone reason to bad mouth you. I do agree with keeping a tight lid on your decision in regards to co-workers and students. Stay sharp and teach to the best of your ability regardless of the outcome - you continue to learn and teach until the very last day.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2017
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  11. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    Feb 12, 2017

    I went through this a few years ago. I was at a private school when it happened, so when I started applying to districts in the area the reason I gave for resigning were financial-I was looking for an increase in salary and needed to start saving more aggressively for retirement. Then I turned it around to them-I had heard XYZ was a great district because...

    I suggest you get letters of recommendation lined up from reliable sources, not necessarily your current employers. I got letters from parents I had good relationships with, colleagues, former colleagues, former principals, even students if they are old enough. If you can't do this save any thank you letters or notes you get as the year goes on. You will need these especially since your current admin doesn't sound like they would give you a good letter of rec.
     
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