Behavior Problems: Your Mindset

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ms.Holyoke, May 9, 2018.

  1. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Groupie

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    Messages:
    1,291
    Likes Received:
    378

    May 9, 2018

    I have been thinking a lot about how to maintain a positive mindset in spite of behavior problems. My student teaching has been difficult because of all of the behavior problems that we have. Apparently, the class of 8th graders that I have has been a nightmare since 5th grade. One thing that I am working on is keeping a positive/calm mindset despite behavior problems. I know that I can't change my students' behaviors, but I can change how I react to it. I can handle the kids' behaviors in the morning but I have been alone with kids the past two afternoons (I never teach afternoon block since it's a different subject, but I was subbing for my mentor.) I'm having a really hard time maintaining a positive mindset and staying calm despite these issues.

    Here are a few things that happened over the past few days:
    -A student telling me to get out of his face--which I ignored
    -Two girls refusing to come back into class.
    -A student running around the classroom with his hood covering his face--which we had to ignore
    -Students repeatedly walking out of class without permission. I told one student I would have to call his mother, and he said "you're just a student teacher, she won't believe you."

    Today, we were watching a movie in science as I subbed for my mentor. The good news is that the kids were quiet during the movie and we didn't have kids walking in and out of class like usual at the end of the day. Kids did not sit in their assigned seats and were on their phones the whole time. I asked two boys to move back but they refused. Two students refused to take their headphones out. It was obnoxious but I tried not to let it affect me and I remained calm. I kept/enforced the expectation that students were quiet during the movie, which they were and their "reward" was recess for 15 minutes at the end of the day. I had a conversation with one of the students at the end of the day who refused to move seats which went alright. However, I am really trying to keep a positive mindset and not let it affect me at the end of the day. My student teaching is almost over and I know my school next year has much better behavioral structures than the school I am in now. However, I am sure I will have some behavior problems and I am really trying to improve my own mindset and not get so frustrated.
     
  2.  
  3. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Messages:
    2,210
    Likes Received:
    1,072

    May 9, 2018

    You're ALWAYS going to have behavioral problems that will be as tiny as a kid saying "no'' when you ask him to do something to freaking out and physically destroying the classroom. In my short tenure as a teacher I've seen A LOT! But the typical response is "treat them with the warm and fuzzies'' and everything will be OK. Yeah. This is why many teachers are just quitting the profession within the first few years... if they even make it past their first. I know many who haven't.
    You absolutely can focus on HOW to respond to it and not take anything personally or let it destroy you mentally. The teachers who really burn out fast are the ones who act as if the students' opposition is toward them because they all want to be the "best'' and "favorite teacher.'' Your pain in the a$$ kids have always (and many will always) be a huge pain.
    But if you can learn to harness their craziness and build relationships, you CAN create some kick a$$ lessons! The problem is that you're not always allowed to do that. It's interesting how in teacher ed we're taught to "tap into students' background knowledge, experiences, and INTERESTS'' and yet are rarely -- if ever - -allowed to write lesson plans based on them. Some you get handed a scripted curriculum and are told to teach it verbatim.
    Good luck with that trying to get the kids to do what you need them to do.
    :roll:
     
    Backroads likes this.
  4. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    4,951
    Likes Received:
    558

    May 9, 2018

    For the "my mom won't believe you" student, call them out on it. Call mom and see. Yes, you might actually get that response from Mom, but chances are that Mom will believe you. I've very rarely had a parent take the "I don't believe you" stance when I've called them or talked to them in person. Kids try it hoping that you won't bother calling.

    Kids who can't keep their hoods off their heads don't get to wear hoodies. I've had kids who had to wear non-hooded sweatshirts because they couldn't handle the hood. They can't wear hoodies at DH's school, so they don't have that issue.

    What's the school phone rule? Ours can't have them out during class, so they are confiscated and sent to the office if we see them. Same at DH's school.
     
  5. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Groupie

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    Messages:
    1,291
    Likes Received:
    378

    May 9, 2018

    ^
    I did text the students' mother (as I have done so before.)

    Students are not supposed to have their phones out but the expectation is not consistent/not enforced. Because we were watching a movie (that had no academic relevance) I think the students felt like they could.

    I honestly could never work in a school like the one I am student teaching in. I'm just trying to find a way to stay positive and not let it affect my mental health.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2018
  6. rpan

    rpan Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2017
    Messages:
    550
    Likes Received:
    408

    May 10, 2018

    Behaviour problems are going to be in every classroom. Have a proactive attitude towards classroom management. If your lessons are engaging then they won’t get up to no good. If you model respect to them you earn their respect and they tend to not be rude or defiant.
     
  7. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Messages:
    2,210
    Likes Received:
    1,072

    May 10, 2018

    The downside of subbing: the work is usually crap (and the kids know it.) I often have to deal with "this is stupid'' or "why do we have to do this?'' And then the attitude, and behavior bombs explode.
    :(

    I just remind students to not get mad or direct their feelings at ME because I really have no control over what is left to do.
     
  8. rpan

    rpan Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2017
    Messages:
    550
    Likes Received:
    408

    May 10, 2018

    It’s a different ball game when you are subbing. When I sub I always start the lesson telling students this is what Miss Smith left for you to accomplish this lesson. Just to let them know that they have to answer to their teacher if they muck around. If I sense that the class is particularly difficult then I add in my own incentive that if all students finish by a certain time then we watch a movie or something at the end of the lesson. This is also proactive in my opinion
     
    Leaborb192 likes this.
  9. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Messages:
    2,210
    Likes Received:
    1,072

    May 10, 2018

    I would be careful with that though because if the teacher doesn't like that, then it can cause problems on the back end. "Oh the sub let us watch a movie!'' I already get in enough trouble for the things I say, I don't need that too. I usually play music while the kids are working and let them pick the music as long as it's school appropriate. The kids rarely -- if EVER -- are allowed to have music playing quietly in the background, which is sad, but it's a true privilege to earn it. And I've now worked in MANY settings as a second year sub and it works more often than not. There are some classes (or kids) that don't care either way so it's not really a reward to earn and keep, but it has seriously been a miracle performer for some of the kids -- deemed the "bad'' kids -- that I have worked with.
    Seriously I won't forget that a note was left for me regarding one third grader and it was this huge warning :warning: However, he ended up being one of the BEST kids that day and even will run and give me hugs when he sees me around the building.
    But I don't have the pressure to get stuff done like teachers do so I feel more free.
    :heart:
     
    Master Pre-K likes this.
  10. miss-m

    miss-m Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Messages:
    952
    Likes Received:
    403

    May 10, 2018

    This is not a foolproof thing though. For the general population of students, yes: engaging lessons mean they just don't have time to misbehave. But there's also that small percent of the student population that just doesn't fit the general rule. I had many engaging lessons last year where 95% of my class was excited to participate and they were actively engaged. Then there was that one kid who just refused to do anything.

    Some kids just don't or can't follow directions and do what's expected; there's a 2nd grader at my school now who becomes defiant and shuts down with something as simple as "Please put your hood down inside." He just gets in this pattern of defiance that I'm actually not sure he CAN get out of on his own.
     
    allaphoristic and Backroads like this.
  11. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Messages:
    2,210
    Likes Received:
    1,072

    May 10, 2018

    Oppositional Defiance Disorder? Many Bipolar? Some kids DO have serious mental health stuff going on... I had an ODD/ ADHD third grader and yeah.. . I feel for the kids and their struggles as well as the parents because it's not an easy life, but I have all of these other kids to worry about while you sit there and refuse to do work or try to destroy my classroom.
    :(
     
    Master Pre-K likes this.
  12. miss-m

    miss-m Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Messages:
    952
    Likes Received:
    403

    May 10, 2018

    There is some diagnosed stuff going on for sure. It took every bit of energy to stay calm and patient with him because I knew that at some level, he really couldn't help it. But another teacher and I had to half drag him up the stairs to the recovery room because he just kept escalating over tiny things, and then he straight up refused to walk up the stairs.

    Engaging lessons are just not the miracle solution people want them to be; some kids will still act out no matter what for a host of reasons.
     
    Leaborb192 likes this.
  13. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Messages:
    2,210
    Likes Received:
    1,072

    May 10, 2018

    I know "engagement'' is not the magic bullet. It's part of the solution but I don't think there's just ONE answer. Like you say what might be engaging to Us (as teachers) and Billy Bob isn't to Jakey and Johnny who would rather act out and stir the pot. And yet we just mix all of these kids together and say to the teachers, "OK, now teach!'' And the kids better learn.
    o_O
     
    Backroads likes this.
  14. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    2,919
    Likes Received:
    1,317

    May 10, 2018

    I think there is definitely something to be said for engaging lessons. Probably a good Tier 1 strategy, if you think in such terms, that might even help some of your Tier 2 behavior problems. The idea is to narrow down the kids who need more. Not a magic bullet, but something that can be considered a fairly respectable strategy.

    My personal difficulty with it is when a fair number of the class isn't your typical pretty okay behaved kid. I have a class that I would guestimate to be at least 50% attention-ish issues (including actual paperwork, parents' explanations, and my own observations). I do have to tap in deeper than a standard engaging lesson, and I still have about six kids I have to almost constantly redirect.
     
  15. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,237
    Likes Received:
    258

    May 12, 2018

    I had a note like that. Covered 3rd gr. The kid had a study divider on his desk. This teacher left a two-page note on what to do if he did x, y or z. Then she finally said, “Just send him next door!”

    Well, this little kid came in. Didn’t look anything like Bart Simpson to me. He didn’t do anything but twist a rubber band back and forth.:rolleyes:

    He did his work, 10 min. later, messy, but it was done.

    Kid was a bit hyper, but no biggie. I’ve seen far worse.

    I suspect regular teacher couldn’t deal with him at all.
    Yeah, that kid needs a one-on-one. I can’t work in those conditions. You are constantly replacing and repairiing items. Your room looks like a train wreck. Everyone is on eggshells. You document all this madness and admin. keeps saying, no discipline...re-direct the child.:mad:
     
    Leaborb192 likes this.
  16. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Messages:
    2,210
    Likes Received:
    1,072

    May 12, 2018

    Wanna know the FUNNIEST (said ironically) thing? So he refused to do work except when he was working one on one, he would actually get it done. So I had my TA work with him while he took the tests. He didn't need her help or anything, he just liked having that support. He bonded more with adults than his peers anyway. So... during his 504 plan meeting I brought up the fact that he was successful working with a TA and if there was any way he could get one. My principal said, "My recommendation is that you STOP that right now because he's not going to have someone working with him one on one his whole life'' and that it wasn't "helping'' him in the long run... DA F? They also laughed when I suggested the one on one because they snidely remarked that "A lot of students could use one.''
    :roll:
    Those were just a few examples of how I lost respect for the admin there.
    Needless to say, the TA stopped working with him... so he stopped doing a lot of the work and basically was a pain until December when his mom pulled him! It was literally the day before Christmas break when they called me. He left early and never came back.
     
  17. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,237
    Likes Received:
    258

    May 12, 2018

    I think what really gets me is that ALL these kids are wizards with computers!! I mean from age 5 to 15, they have never seen a electronic gadget they couldn't master. They stop wiggling in their seats long enough to tell me what's wrong with my Smartboard! I say no library or computer lab today, and they have a 1/2 hr tantrum!!

    In fact, computer time is the ONLY thing that will make them sit still and concentrate, besides eating. How is it that a child who claims he doesn't understand, needs help, can't do this or that, will miraculously hop in a seat for computer time, and blow up buildings, crash cars and save the world?? Does that not take organization, (I can't remember what to do?), ordering (I lost my stuff!), reading and math (I can't read this!!! Is this the right answer, is that right?) Yeah, you never hear a peep outta these kids unless the system is slow or crashes. Actually, some will get up and start diagnosing the problem! (Your modem is loose, and we don't have a good wifi connection.)

    :confused:
     
  18. Been There

    Been There Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2017
    Messages:
    847
    Likes Received:
    511

    May 12, 2018

    This is the reason that more teachers should embrace the potential of educational technology! When infants are given iphones and tablets to keep them occupied, it's no wonder that they're all addicted to technology by the time they enter school. For years, I refused to use computers with my students, choosing to believe that they were a total waste of time. It wasn't until every teacher at our school was given a laptop to use (no expectations) that I experienced the magic of multimedia instruction. The real clincher for me was the day I discovered the mesmerizing effect digital lessons had on even the most incorrigible students in the school! If I were were able to come into your classroom today, you'd be able to see first-hand what I mean.

    The problem with using technology other than for games is that most educators have not been trained to create their own digital lessons. Teachers are for the most part unfamiliar with instructional design that involves the active use of highly-synchronized animation effects, images, sound effects, narration and text to facilitate the comprehension and retention of new material. So, one possible work-around is to give students the liberty to write their own hi-tech stories using Powerpoint or one of many cartoon apps - let them show you how it's done!

    Someone who throws a tantrum to get their way will make an immediate 180 if told that a technological learning opportunity awaits anyone who demonstrates proper readiness. Been there.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2018
  19. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Messages:
    2,210
    Likes Received:
    1,072

    May 12, 2018

    Preach! My Literacy Specialist program emphasizes technology for that very reason! It's the 21st century and we need to know how to adapt and instruct to meet the needs of our students. And using technology goes way beyond including a Youtube video or having students play Prodigy. You have to be willing to go down the rabbit hole and "play.''


    [​IMG]
     
  20. Been There

    Been There Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2017
    Messages:
    847
    Likes Received:
    511

    May 12, 2018

    Since you're in a literacy specialist program, I thought you might like to see a presentation that I created to teach figurative language to a class of second graders who were mostly ELLs. After I read a figure of speech to the class and showed them the corresponding animation, students were asked to think about the three choices and select the one that they thought best describes the intended meaning. What's missing is the lively discussion we had about each one. Students had little difficulty understanding the different figures of speech that I heard being used among themselves after just a few days. They had so much fun using their new language skills! I would love to receive your academic critique.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2018
  21. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,237
    Likes Received:
    258

    May 13, 2018

    Many of us Baby Boomer teachers became victims of the Digital Divide. We were the last ones on the block to get cable, and they finally killed antenna TV. We were forced to get a converter box so we could watch free TV.

    We refused to get cell phones and email accounts and now we have to wait weeks for in person appointments and snail mail and we’re penalized with a “paper statement fee”.

    You can’t even apply for a job without downloading your life history. Even after you are hired some jobs force you to use your own time, computer and ink for “onboading”, eliminating the HR rep and making you print and submit your new hire package.

    Technology isn’t a thing to learn....it’s part of our lives and here to stay.

    If only the Baby Boomers could get cheat sheets and a crash course in technology, we might not avoid computers, but actually utilize them in our classroom and genuinely embrace them.

    Is there an app for that??
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. YoungTeacherGuy,
  2. TrademarkTer,
  3. miss-m,
  4. Ima Teacher,
  5. Mami1Maestra2
Total: 284 (members: 7, guests: 247, robots: 30)
test