Behavior Management in Kindergarten

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by pixiegirl1492, Jul 20, 2012.

  1. pixiegirl1492

    pixiegirl1492 New Member

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    Jul 20, 2012

    I wasn't sure where to post this...the behavior management section or Kindergarten. So, I posted it in Kindergarten, as you fellow Kindergarten teachers would have the best idea of the needs within this age group.

    Here is my question, has anyone used a reward system for Kindergarten?

    I had an idea to reward positive pehavior actions/choices. For positive behavior actions/choices children would receive a ticket. They would write their name on it and place it into a jar. At the end of the day 5 tickets would be pulled out of the jar, these 5 children would then choose a reward of their choice (such as little items from oriental trading). Tickets not pulled from the jar would stay in the jar, so they would be given another chance the next day and so on to have their ticket pulled.

    Any opinions? or thoughts? :unsure:

    In the past I have only ever had children pull cards for behavior. The children would start the day on a happy face card, if there was a behavior issue they would pull a green, then a yellow, then a red. This has worked, but I am wondering if there is something "better" out there.
     
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  3. christine89

    christine89 Companion

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    Jul 20, 2012

    Sounds great so far! I also tried a card system (green, red, yellow, etc) and I plan on switching it up a little this year. Your ticket idea is good though. Someone from a special ed department came and observed a student one day in my room and asked about my system. Her biggest advice to me was to make sure that students know exactly what those positive choices/actions are that will make them succeed.
    I'd say it sounds good. I would say that if you're doing 5 prizes daily, those prizes could run out quick!!
     
  4. time out

    time out Comrade

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    Jul 20, 2012

    The only concern I would have is that some students would get multiple prizes while others would receive none. I've seen this work for older kids but I'm not sure if kindergarteners would be as understanding. I do like the idea of focusing on more positive behaviors though.
     
  5. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Jul 21, 2012

    I really like the lottery system because it gives you a lot of reinforcement "units" to give out (tickets) without having to actually reinforce it.

    I don't like card systems because there aren't enough steps typically between "Green" or whatever the base color is, and the final (bottom) step. Teachers end up either not pulling cards consistently to preserve cards for later in the day, or kids end up "bankrupt" by 9:30 in the morning. I tend to prefer systems with smaller increments of punishment/reinforcement so you give/take more throughout the day without reaching your max, and without consequences being so severe. So, giving/taking 1 minute (or even 15 second) increments of academic free choice at the end of a block might be useful (can be somewhat tricky to manage, but probably more effective).
     
  6. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Jul 21, 2012

    I don't think the little ones actually understand lottery systems. I'm not sure their parents would be too happy about it either. When Johnny goes home mad he didn't get a prize, you'll hear from mom about it.

    They need something really simple and easy to understand. I use a sticker chart, they get a sticker for the day if they stayed on green all day (red, yellow, green). If they get stickers for each day of a week they get to eat lunch with me in the classroom on Friday or take a class stuffed animal home-something like that.

    Ed-I agree with you about color charts, however, if you earn a ticket every day and still don't get a prize-that's not going to work as an incentive either.
     
  7. punchinello

    punchinello Comrade

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    Jul 22, 2012

    I actually tried something last year. No rewards at all. It was SO hard, but after reading Alfie Kohn....well, he's a bit extreme. But his logic does make sense.

    http://www.alfiekohn.org/teaching/pdf/Punished by Rewards.pdf

    All I did was notice when a child made a good choice. We had lots of discussions about being helpful/a good friend, etc. Then I would just acknowledge what I observed.

    It worked, but I did cave during the second half of the year and used the Scoreboard from Whole Brain Teaching. They had fun working together to get smilies...

    I never did like individual rewards or systems.
     
  8. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Jul 22, 2012

    I can definitely see your point about K students perhaps not understanding the lottery system.
     
  9. vannapk

    vannapk Groupie

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    Aug 5, 2012

    I don't use any trinkets, stickers, or prize boxes, instead I use a variety of techniques that allow students to make their own choices and develop self-regulations skills. Little ones need to be supported and taught how to make their own choices, this is the greatest reward they can receive. You can read more about my system and how it works here. A lot of those "systems" out there are not normed for young children. We see them being used with older kids and think it's o.k. for the little ones too and that's where we run into problems.
     

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