ASPERGER SYNDROME BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by jubilee joy, Sep 10, 2006.

  1. jubilee joy

    jubilee joy Rookie

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    Sep 10, 2006

    I just started working last week as an aide for a 5 year old child with Aspergers. I have been praying for the opportunity to work with a child like this, and God opened the door for me. He goes to Early Childhood in the morning, and he needed an aide for the afternoon. He is beautiful, smart and challenging at the same time. I have never worked with children like this myself, but I have a real desire and I've done a lot of reading. . He is very confused because he has had different subs everyday. When I subbed I realized how badly he needed stability and a set routine, so I put my application in to do this full time. He is very aggressive which I believe is due to his frustration about all the changes. I believe once he sees me everyday, he wil begin to trust me. On Friday, he ate lunch, played outside then had rest time. He doesn't rest so one day he was allowed to walk around the room aimlesly, the next day I had to watch him in a room just the two of us. Not Structure!! He played with puzzles, glue, markers, books, blocks etc just racing from one thing to the next... Then we had music. He lasted about 3 minutes then played Toy Story on the computer in the music room. I was told he only had to participate if he wanted to. All was well until I told him and showed him with his cards that it was time to go back to the classroom. I gave him lots of warning and allowed him to finish his game. We made it down the hall and almost got to the door,(we have to go outside to a new portable building) then he bolted. He ran as fast as he could away from me. I got some help, and we chased him. When I caught up with him he got mad and had a major meltdown. He bit me, kicked me, pinched me, pulled my hair you name it!!!! I feel so helpless. I wrap my arms and legs around him to calm him down but he is so stong. He ran at me and knocked me over!! His Early Childhood teacher is wonderful but she's down the hall, and the Kindergarten teacher that I'm under knows nothing about kids with Asperger's and she leaves everyday 30 minutes after I get there for the whole month of Sept. I'm left with a sub teacher It's crazy!!!! Please help with behavior mod. and anything else I can do to make this transition easier for the both of us. :) :thanks:
     
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  3. Giggles1100

    Giggles1100 Comrade

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    Sep 10, 2006

    Oh I bet Aspie teacher can help you. I cannot as I have never had the chance to work with them that young, I have worked with some PDD kids with Aspergers a little older you, I know with the constant moving from one thing to another and not focusing could be cause by him needing to run. You might try to take him outside let him run or hang from the monkey bars for 5 minutes at a time and let him stay out for about 10 minutes then take him in to try to get him to do work, I know this is more of a PDD treatment But is could work. Good Luck.
     
  4. Alitig1

    Alitig1 Rookie

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    Sep 11, 2006

    The most importaNT THING FOR ME WHEN working with this age group is to use the phrase :THE RULE IS... whenever I want to change a behavior. Of course, keeping the routine consistent is imporatnt, and I am sure you are uncomfortable with the idea that he can do whatever he wants while at school. I teach pre-k handicapped and my aspie/ASD kids all know that nap time means they stay on their mat quietly. That is the rule in our school. They don't have to sleep, the don't get toys to play with, and they don't get personal one on one attention to keep them on the mat either. They stay because the are rediected to stay over and over during the first week when we are learning all procedures.

    Aspie kids generally will follow rules when they know what they are. If you ave a child who runs away you need to change the environment to make sur ehe can't run away - meaning get him into the classroom where the rest of the kids are and make sure he sees what is supposed to be happening at that time. Make sure he knows how long nap time is - either through pictures or through saying nap time is like the time for 3 Blues clues shows. Make sure he knows that nap time is non-negotiable.

    I also hope you are documentting the physical things he is doing to you because they sound horrible to me and I wuld want to get some more support from someone else in your school. If this a public school? Why is he is Early childhood and Kindergarten?
     
  5. ellen_a

    ellen_a Groupie

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    Sep 11, 2006

    (1) You remind me of Echo Fling--she discovered this with her son and exploited it when he was in school! It is true and a very helpful notion to keep in mind. Remember that children with Aspergers often find "abstract" concepts troublesome, so in making "rules" you are creating a more concrete concept.

    (2) I'd use a visual timer for naptime--it may even benefit the other students. I love timers, they have helped me with behavior time and time again.
     
  6. jubilee joy

    jubilee joy Rookie

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    Sep 11, 2006

    Great ideas!!

    Thank you so much for all the great ideas! I wrote details about the situation not to use in a selfish, unethical way but because I really love working with this child and I want to do a better job with him. I really want to reach him and let him know I care so he can feel comfortable with me. I felt like a failure already and needed some helpful tips so I could better meet his needs. The K teacher and I are in the same boat, we've never worked with a child like this before and we are learning together. I feel sorry for her because she has other children to teach not just him. I am not very helpful to her yet, and I feel lost because she has to leave soon after I get there. The things he did like pulling my hair ect.. I believe will stop once I am more confident and consistent. I'm not sure of all the rules and what I can expect of him yet so I thought I would volunteer my time in the morning and watch his Early Childhood aide work with him so I can learn. :)
     
  7. AspieTeacher

    AspieTeacher Comrade

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    Sep 14, 2006

    Jubilee_Joy,

    I am a special education teacher who has been diagnosed with AS (Asperger's Syndrome). I want you to know that people and children with AS have sensory issues (ALL FIVE SENSES). First, you should figure out what "triggers" are cues to causing a sensory-overload or what some NT call a "tantrum" or a "meltdown." Children with AS may APPEAR to be very knowledgeable with vocabulary and its use, but they require a step-by-step analysis of simple social interaction. I would first determine what reinforces him (what makes him want to do things or increase a behavior). ALso, what are some of his favorite things? We require a "consistent, repetitive, pattern or routine) which is free from change as much as possible. Most of the time UNEXPECTED or SURPRISES cause sensory-overload. It helps to "pre-warn" or give him a tme-limit to complete activities. Most students with AS require a schedule as much as a lower functioning student with autism. I would suggest a daily breakdown of his classroom activities. Once you have determined what his main activities are: such as centers, language arts, lunch, snack, physical education, recess, ect. Show him the schedule and walk him through the schedule. If you know there is going to be a change (pre-warn or prepare him AHEAD as much as possible). Students with AS love to be kept busy with something to do. Most of them require visually structured activities. Also, if he shows signs of being overwhelmed give him a visual cue (words such as break) which allows him to be isolated and calm himself until his senses are functional. If you would like some more suggestions, please don't hesitate to contact me at my email address. I get my screen name from my autism and I'm also a special education teacher. I know exactly how the little guy feels and trust me, it's nothing personal. Take care and keep in touch.

    AspieTeacher (I proudly embrace my own autism)
    Troy in Downey, Ca
     
  8. jubilee joy

    jubilee joy Rookie

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    Sep 15, 2006

    Amazing three days

    I worked with my little guy for three days this week. Everyday was better than the one before. He has stopped needing his transitional objects so I think he is more secure with me. He is working and eating great. I have had to learn to be consistant every minute, and he knows I won't back down. He has stopped running away from me on the playground and he's obeying the boundries 90% of the time. I go home every night totally exhausted, but ready to do it all over the next day! He is non verbal, but understands sign. Today out of the blue, he said "more please" at snack.., you can imagine how fast I ran to get him more!!! :D Thanks for your help
     
  9. AspieTeacher

    AspieTeacher Comrade

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    Sep 27, 2006

    Jubilee,

    When he graduates from college and "remembers" that special teacher back in elementary and thanks you is when the tears are going to start to rush through. Thanks for all the things NT teachers and general education teachers do for us special needs "kids!"

    Troy in Downey, Ca
    AspieTeacher
     
  10. jubilee joy

    jubilee joy Rookie

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    Sep 27, 2006

    I feel blessed to have the opportunity! I went into this not because I needed the job, but I wanted to make a difference in some little child's life. It's awesome!!!
     
  11. ellen_a

    ellen_a Groupie

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    Sep 27, 2006

    Yea!
    That makes me very happy.
    When you reach that point, where he trusts you enough to respect you/your boundaries/your expectations/your rules, that's when the real progress can begin.
    :D

    Ellen A.
     
  12. Aspie_mom

    Aspie_mom Rookie

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    Oct 3, 2006

    Jubilee Joy,

    One of the biggest mistakes teachers have made with my son is believing that the behavior will get better when he "likes" them. The teacher's aide that he loved the most would get her feelings hurt when my son would hit or kick her. The problem wasn't her or a lack of affection for her.

    My son was in not placed in the appropriate classroom and did not receive autism services from the county at that time.

    If you and the regular teacher feel overwhelmed, then I would say that child needs more county services. Improved behavior will only happen when you improve the environment for him.

    Good luck and remember that the child is dealing with a disability. You will not see him outgrow it before the end of this school year. His behavior will improve and relapse. Sometimes, nothing you do will be right. But, if you really like him, he will know it and appreciate it...even if he's a stinker sometimes.
     

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