Are there more jobs in Illinois and New Jersey?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by abcd, Feb 17, 2019.

  1. abcd

    abcd Rookie

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    Feb 17, 2019

    I see maximum number of teaching jobs on www.k12jobspot.com in Illinois followed by New Jersey. Are there more jobs in these two states? New York is more populated than these states. I wonder why there are more jobs inn IL and NJ.
     
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  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Feb 17, 2019

    I can't speak for IL, but NJ has more people per square mile, so simple density would explain a lot. Add to that the fact there are multiple school districts within a very small area, and you would have the need for more teachers. The district in small district A, which adjoins small district B means that there are multiple requirements for the same type of teachers who would be paid by different districts. This would differ for huge districts in other states that are under a single control, which probably is more efficient when it comes to use of talent. As a teacher in NJ, when I subbed, I covered 3 individual districts that were all within 6 minutes of my house. Lot's of overlap, IMO, but necessary based on how districts are funded, which is property taxes. I have no idea if this explains IL, but feel strongly that this lifts the veil of "why" so many listings in NJ. Hope that helps.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2019
  4. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Devotee

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    Feb 18, 2019

    Everyone is moving out of Illinois.
    My district (in Illinois, but not Chicago area) has a huge shortage of teachers. Many positions are filled by long term subs or rotating subs.
    They (the state of Illinois) recently started allowing people with just an Associate's degree to sub because of the shortage (but they're not allowed to long term and they're paid less)
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2019
  5. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Feb 18, 2019

    Wow, that is a recipe for disaster. What does your district plan on doing if this trend continues? And what are the average salaries for beginning teachers in your area? I speculate that that may have something to do with the shortage.

    For example, if I decide to not teach AP Computer Science next year, then my private school will have to hire a new teacher (which is why they are keen for me to take it on, haha!). To ensure that they find a qualified candidate, if it comes to that, they plan to offer an above-market rate ($60,000 for a first-year teacher with 5% annual raises up to a max of $100,000/year). Why would they offer such a high salary? Well, it is because Computer Science positions are the *most* difficult to fill, even higher than foreign language, SPED, and math! I think your district should follow suit.
     
  6. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Devotee

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    Feb 18, 2019

    It's not even a trend; this has been the norm for many many years. It's a rough area that no one wants to work/teach in. All the wealthy families send their kids to private school. A lot of families homeschool here too.
    I think starting salary is in the 30k's. I actually don't know, although I did look it up once. Long term subs get paid more than first year teachers because they're desperate for subs to fill all the vacancies
     
  7. Sbass1487

    Sbass1487 New Member

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    Feb 20, 2019

    Vickilyn, I would first like to thank you for all the information you provide on here. I have read all your posts regarding AR certification. My question is, even though those jobs are posted, is there hope for future teachers like me to be hired for the next school year? I’m moving to Jersey from California in June. My hope is to receive my certification in P-3 early childhood to teach Kinder. Possibly considering SPED. I’m already in the process of taking the required tests. Also, I know program I want to attend. I am currently working as an aide in SPED 2nd/3rd grade High Alt. Core, and before working in Film, I worked with Kinder as an aide for 5 years. I actually would love to teach in an “Urban” community such as Newark because I’m comfortable in those areas, and I have a passion for those students. Seeing posts on here has me a little worried that finding a job will be hard. Should I be concerned? Any suggestions or input? Sorry for the long post. I appreciate you! :)



     
  8. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Feb 20, 2019

    Are you coming to NJ with certification in hand, or coming and receiving training here? To consider SPED in NJ if you don't already have that, then you will need to take 7 grad courses, at a minimum, from a list of approved NJ universities. The designation you will be looking at here is TOSD or TSD, which simply means that you can teach any content you are certified for to students with disabilities, which is SPED. I have a handful of certificates which means I can teach SPED students in any of those content classifications. For me, K-6, MS ELA, MS Science, MS SS, and K-12 Biology/life sciences/General Science.

    You ask about job availability. Preschool Handicap is not overly filled, to the best of my knowledge, due to the fact that PreK is different from K-6. If you have or will acquire the PreK certificate, I see your prior experience meshing well. Acquiring your TOSD can be done once you are hired on a provisional TOSD certificate, which gives you about 3 years to complete the TOSD coursework.

    I believe your one disadvantage will be wanting that K-6 certificate and job. That job pool is highly competitive and fairly saturated. Read through threads in the forums, and you will see that as a frequent complaint. Part of what you are up against is the fact that anyone who wants to teach MS also has to earn their Elem. Ed. certificate. If they don't get the MS job, they are still qualified to apply for K-6 positions.

    You have wisely considered where you are willing to seek employment. There is little doubt that you have chosen a niche that is most in need of teachers, so not looking at it as a last place choice is beneficial. You have some experience that may help you find a job, especially if you commit to taking the coursework to earn the TOSD certificate. Being able to articulate that you see that as a definite goal can't hurt.

    I believe that you may receive more replies that will be more specific to your needs. Even though I "can" teach K, 1, and 2, I freely admit to not being into the "itty bitties". I can only tie so many shoes in a day, and wipe so many noses. I think that teachers who work with that age range, and do it well, are godsends - and that they are far better at the job than I ever could have been. I do have experience with PreK Handicap due to family history, and I know a lot because I volunteered and later subbed in that capacity. I found my niche in MS, so imagine my surprise to be hired for a HS position when I went AR. Several years into this, I finally have some MS students once again, but I am still predominantly a HS teacher. It's all good, I'm happy, but a small part of me wishes that first job had been in 7th or 8th grade science.
     
  9. Sbass1487

    Sbass1487 New Member

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    Feb 20, 2019

    Thank you for your input! Not yet, but I am currently working on it. I just took the Praxis Core last night and will be taking the Praxis II next month. Will apply for CE as soon as I can. During my visit to NJ last month I went to Montclair University and really liked the curriculum and campus, so I will be applying for their early childhood AR program once hired somewhere, as well as for my masters in TOSD once settled in.

    I appreciate your feedback on the job market. I have definitely seen the concerns and saturation in the posts, so I hope that my experience and networking will help. I’ve tutored MS and taught an after school program with 4th/5th grade so I applaud you for having patience for our growing youth! I prefer the snotty noses and untied shoe laces! I might be a little biased since my mother taught Kinder 33 out of her 35 years of teaching before retiring so I was around it. However, I’m open to changes to broaden my knowledge. Thanks again!
     
  10. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Feb 20, 2019

    I just want to make sure that you know you are free to get the Master's in SPED, but it isn't necessary to teach. Many earn the TOSD online. Several people I work with did online with Rutgers, which was exactly the 7 necessary courses. I attended Centenary University, taking four courses during the two summer semesters each summer. They meet once a week per course, and they are going to some hybrid models for the classes, meaning less on campus meetings. Some universities require more than 21 credits, and others add practicums, which doesn't work well if you already have a full time job. I don't champion any one university, but do advise to truly check out the program. Most people who earn the Master's are looking to be part of the CST. I never had that interest, but maybe you do. Best of luck!
     
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  11. Sbass1487

    Sbass1487 New Member

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    Feb 20, 2019

    I will certainly look into it! Thank you!
     

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