APUSH After the AP Test

Discussion in 'General Education' started by megawinn, May 4, 2011.

  1. megawinn

    megawinn Rookie

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    May 4, 2011

    With the AP test this Friday, we have a month of school left. I teach with another more experienced teacher and he has kept a great schedule so we have finished discussing the last chapter of our textbook. We've spent the entire week reviewing for the AP. After the test, we are splitting our classes up again.

    So here's my question: What to do after the AP exam?

    I remember taking APUSH as a high school student and being really annoyed when our teacher continued lecturing up the end of school.

    However, I do not want to waste time when we could be discussing important information. The students will be better prepared for college by knowing this information.

    Does anyone have ideas?
     
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  3. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    May 4, 2011

    Here's what my classes do - we watch movies, and use it as a study hall. I have pushed my kids, challenged them, worked them to death and they have taken a three hour really hard test and I think that's enough :) We have three weeks left in school in which most of them have multiple projects due. So, we watch approriate movies, for APUSH we're watching 'Cinderella Man,' 'The Murder of Emmitt Till,' and 'Saints and Soldiers,'; for my APEURO, we're watching 'Amazing Grace,' 'Young Victoria,' and the PBS series 'Victorian House.' And since all my students are academic students, they do take advantage of using the period as a study hall.

    I will probably be in the minority, but I know my students have earned the right to take a break for these last few weeks.
     
  4. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    May 4, 2011

    I also need to add that my students are required to complete a summer assignment so my students by May 6th have really been working on AP 11 months.
     
  5. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    May 4, 2011

    I've done this before and it's what I currently do. Like yours my kids have a summer assignment as well. I've also tried doing more contemporary issues and history the last month and subjects that are a little more interesting (ie civil rights, JFK's assassination, etc.) but I now just put a movie on and let the kids use it as a Study Hall it then also turns into another prep for me which is great because my other classes (non-honors) are gearing up for projects and exams at that time and I usually have a lot of things to grade.
     
  6. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

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    May 4, 2011

    We have 4 weeks, but only three are instructional (one is a week-long special course).

    Week 1: Movies (Band of Brothers, Songcatcher, they watch a movie of their choice alone)

    Week 2: Food and history (short essay on a family recipe, experimentation with historical recipes, discussion of food and culture)

    Week 3: Lies (our English teacher is showing "Shattered Glass and teaching about memoirs. I am teaching about Michael Bellisles, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Stephen Ambrose and Joseph Ellis)

    I agree with INTeacher that they have done enough work. But I can't just let them sit there. Would they study? Sure. Would I feel like a waste? Yes. So They're learning, just topics I couldn't include earlier and that I consider interesting.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2011
  7. Soccer Dad

    Soccer Dad Cohort

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    May 4, 2011

    I think a month of movies can become mundane. I think a nice week/week and half of movie watching is a nice treat. When I took APUSH in high school, my teacher assigned a great end of the year project based on modern presidents. We had to choose a president from WWII onward and rate them (below average, average, above average, great). Using a rating as our thesis, we then had to provide evidence to support it. After a brief explanation, our classmates tried to prove our thesis wrong and it was our job to make sure we could defend our rating. I think this would make a brilliant project with presidents like LBJ, Reagan, Clinton and Bush. All four certainly bring out the most extreme views.

    Of course, I'm always biased towards debates since I love 'em!
     
  8. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    May 4, 2011

    If you don't want to do movies, what about a "light" but relevant project of some sort. When I was in HS, we did a project on social history in the 20th century. We were not allowed to mention any "heavy" stuff. The presentation was all about the social aspect of whatever decade our group was assigned. We talked about music, movies, entertainment, fashion, and other things of that nature. It was fun, and since the time frame in question was a time when at least our grandmothers were alive, it was fairly easy. When my group presented, we turned the classroom into a disco with a disco ball and everything! (We got the 70's). The group with the 50's did a sock hop, the group with the 20's did a silent film. It was a blast.

    Anyway, my point is that maybe you could do something similarly light, fun, but still "educational".
     
  9. tchr4evr

    tchr4evr Companion

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    May 5, 2011

    AP Language

    We're starting with a movie of a book they read, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and then we're going to touch on things we don't get to. I do a poetry unit, I also talk about fine art. They also have a book project on one of the works they read. So, it becomes much less pressure but they are still learning.
     
  10. Ken Welk

    Ken Welk New Member

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    May 18, 2019

    I have five weeks after the APUSH exam. I use the movie "Vantage Point" to lead off a look at different perspectives in recording history. Then students select an event and research at least three perspectives of the recording of the event. This can be from consipiracy theories to eyewitness accounts. This takes up week one. Students will love the movie. I insert about three different days of trivia competition. They love this. I do all sorts of trivia. One of the days is just U.S. History. I have also had classes determine who would be president elected today from all of the presidents the U.S. has had. I do this by creating a March Madness bracket and assign a pairing to two students. They have to research the issues and platform of each president and also the voting trends of states. Students learn a lot about the electoral system. When each student presents their winner, the rest of the class has an opportunity to refute the decision and the class takes a vote. Majority wins. It is a very engaging process and can take about 10 to 13 days to complete. The last one I did, Ronald Reagan defeated John F. Kennedy in the final. I also show a movie called "Deja Vu". Great for discussion about timelines and changing the course of history. I have also done a food fair in which students have to bring something that relates to a geographical area of the United States. I have had cajun food and NY style pizza. It is a very satisfying project. Hope I gave somone another idea.
     
  11. DinoTeach

    DinoTeach Rookie

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    May 23, 2019

    Create a competition that is intrinsically motivating. You could have a bracket of 20th Century presidents and assign each one to a group of students who then have to argue their case in front of their classmates. Let the class votes on who moves on to the next round. They could have a week or so to prepare and then a few days for the arguments.

    You could have them write rap battles of important APUSH characters (see YouTube for historical rap battle examples).
     

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