Anyone else feel undervalued?

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by Caesar753, Feb 8, 2013.

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  1. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Feb 10, 2013

    Caesar~is it just teachers? Or is across the board and affects admin too?

    What needs to happen is that the politicians need to get a pay cut and see how they're affected. Of course that won't happen because they vote on their own pay raises....
     
  2. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Aficionado

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    Feb 10, 2013

    At my district the teachers are definitely not happy. The sup. seems to want to completely destroy our program. These are court, community schools and institutions. Students attend 250 days (or something like that). Teachers used to work 220 days, last year that was reduced to 210, and now there is talk it will be 190. It's 99 % sure that will happen. That's a 30 days pay cut, which is a month and a half paycheck.

    For the upcoming summer he wants to have intersessions. That means teachers will work reduced day with reduced pay. A lot of the teachers will just take off, which means there will be subs in most classrooms for the whole summer. Not good!
    A lot of locations will be closed, not good for the students. Instead of going to school, they'll be roaming the streets without parental supervision, and will likely to re-offend. We're probably lose them to some other charter school anyways, worsening our problems.

    Even subs will suffer, because now we won't have work during the year like we used to. Teacher were taking off during the year weeks at a time, which means I was able to work just about every day without worrying. No it will be only sick days. Most subs won't stick around for that, so teachers will have a hard time finding subs.

    This is just wrong on so many levels. Everything will effect everyone. They already laid off and rearranged classified employees.
    This is why I don't want to stick around, even though I love this area, I know I won't have a job with this district, I'd rather move. By summer time I don't want to be here if I can help it.
     
  3. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    You make an interesting point, Peregrin... one that I would wrestle with as a LTS. As a LTS, my district pays $25 more a day than regular sub pay (after one month... the first month, you make the same amount as normal). As I would sit there and prep, grade, wake up early, stay late, I would sometimes think about the work I was doing relative to the pay I was receiving (as I said, first month you make basically $100/day). And to be quite honest, it did affect me. I graded reports, held parent/teacher conferences, prepared report cards--all within/around that first month... I couldn't help but look and frown at my paycheck that first month, having made only slightly more than I normally would.

    The reason I bring it up is because a) that's one of my definitions of undervalued and b) teachers need to stand together and fight for each other. What we have seen (these past five years) is decimation in the morale of teachers. What Caesar is talking about will continue to happen because (among other things) teachers don't stand up for each other.

    We now have two camps within teaching: the Haves and the Have-nots. The Haves are the teachers, who were around in the years preceding this Depression. They remember the salad days in teaching (i.e. 1999:p, when teachers could take off whenever they felt like taking a weekender to Vegas, or show up to work in stretch pants, etc.) And they resent the "stricter conditions" of today, including a salary that they've now grown to look-down upon (i.e. "no pay raise in x years?!"). They have become bitter at the increase in demands, and carry that attitude with them through the halls. OTOH, you have the Have-nots. These are people that were unceremoniously canned after pouring their heart/soul into their job just like any teacher, or people who can't find a spot for themselves. They are also bitter... many are support-staff now (i.e. hourly reading specialists, sub teachers), who go from classroom to classroom... and they carry bitterness about their plight. They were dumped in favor of teachers who they see now, outwardly disdainful of their "new" role as a teacher--they complain (after all, it's not like it was in the good ol'days), they mope... and the Have-nots look and say, "What the--? I would LOVE ANY OPPORTUNITY to teach... meanwhile this teacher looks like she just came from the dentist all the time???"

    My point is, the teaching ranks are a house divided, and this type of thing will become more common as the years (of this Depression) go by. We have white-washed the education system in this country. Loose-cannonry in the realm of speaking out about what's right... has been replaced by unimaginative yes-men who are tied to their cushy position (complete with very nice retirement plan... wouldn't want to ruin that by speaking out!)

    I recall talking about this on this exact forum, maybe 3-4 years ago! (if it's been that long) I recited a poem, that basically talked about people standing by (back in Europe during WW2) and being OK with others walked off to the gas chamber, as long as it wasn't themselves. Fast forward to today, and we seem to be witnessing it. The bottom line is, if we want to change things (so that things like this don't become any more common than they already are), we need to stop with the political correctness (among teachers), and band together. Not push each other away.
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Feb 10, 2013

    John Lee..you talk about standing up for each other and then in the next breath make divisive statements about the haves and have nots. I haven't been teaching as long as many and certainly work with plenty of newbies (I've mentored quite a few) and seasoned veteran teachers alike. At least in my district, we are united. In fact, in my county we show up for each others' rallies, local legislative meetings and regional union events. One can be empathetic towards others' who are in difficult situations without going through that themselves.:2cents:
     
  5. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Fanatic

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    They remember the salad days in teaching (i.e. 1999, when teachers could take off whenever they felt like taking a weekender to Vegas, or show up to work in stretch pants, etc.)

    I taught before 1992-1999 and we weren't allowed to wear jeans, we stayed late for parent events in the evenings, and we worked hard. The difference between then and now is in the 90's principals listened to our decisions more and there was more of a sense of team with admin. Veteran teachers are just bothered that politicians and administrators are making more decisions without even asking those in the trenches (teachers) how it will effect the students.

    John Lee there were no easy days here in AZ as a teacher in the 90s. My salary might be a bit larger as I am experienced (but I went through lots of tough years making $22,000). I don't see it as haves and have nots where I am. Seniority means nothing where I teach. We are all in the same boat, just like all the teachers in Caesar's district are as they all will get pay cuts. All teachers have challenges.
     
  6. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I think what also fuels this is the fact that back in the 'salad days' as you call it, the parents were on the side of the teachers..Today that's just not the case anymore.
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    :thumb: yes, and we must buoy each other through the tough times.
     
  8. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Feb 10, 2013

    We are NOT in the same boat, that's the point! One is on a large, safe(r) vessel. The other is a life raft, people on which trying to stay afloat any which way they can. The latter may have gotten a "bon voyage" (e.g. a condolence card signed by the rest of the staff) on the way out, but I see nothing else indicates much otherwise.

    We should be in the same boat, you're right about that. And that is something I've advocated all along. But rather than recognizing and appreciating that perspective, people here choose to write me off (e.g. calling me bitter and thereby dismissing my perspective) and get defensive about anything I might say. Whether you think I make divisive comments, it doesn't affect the condition. I only speak honestly from my experience.

    If you asked someone in some war-torn country what she thinks of the people in America... and she said they are pieces of ____ because they did this, that, and the other to them... are you going to tell her she is wrong? Or are you going to appreciate the perspective she brings, and try to come to greater level of consciousness?
     
  9. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    The point is, we ARE all in the same boat. Some might not be feeling the muscle aches yet from paddling, but we're all in the boat. Complaining about your view from the boat does no good.

    The OP is paddling hard...and those of us who are also rowing can feel for her pain.
     
  10. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Feb 10, 2013

    :hugs:
     
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