Any Teachers who are Servicemen or Servicewomen?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Peregrin5, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Phenom

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    I'm thinking into the future, so it's not immediate for me, but I may get another degree in the future. Because of the extreme costs of tuition these days, I'm looking seriously into other options to pay for it, apart from just saving a portion of my paycheck each month (which I am doing already) including enlisting in a reserve branch of the military (again this would be a few years into the future, definitely not now).

    While working in the National Guard probably won't pay for all of it, it will pay a certain amount, however you may be called up for active duty for 8 years after you enroll, so I'm wondering if there's any conflicts with the districts in these cases.

    Anyone who has worked in a branch of the reserve military while being a teacher? Any ideas of what types of benefits being a teacher might bring to your service or vice-versa?
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    A better question would be ...how committed are you to the defense/missions of our country?
     
  4. pete2770

    pete2770 Comrade

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    It's all risk vs. reward really. What are you wiling to sacrifice in order to lower your tuition burden?

    (edit) Just think it through. It's a big commitment.
     
  5. JustMe

    JustMe Guru

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    My sister joined for college purposes. She seems happy with her decision. Of course, as cza mentioned, you can't go into this without a sincere commitment to the service itself. Either you won't survive or you'll be miserable and bitter.

    I've had colleagues, teachers and administrators, currently serving in the NG. I think it was a powerful thing for the students to know/understand.
     
  6. MikeTeachesMath

    MikeTeachesMath Devotee

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    Yeah... I'd never do that, ever.
     
  7. Accountable

    Accountable Companion

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    I think it might help you. A variety of experiences only enhances your perspective. The military will also enhance your discipline from all three sides: accepting it, imposing it, and exercising self-discipline.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    DH is a Naval Academy grad...he saw it as a way to go to college, but he fully understood and respected the commitment he was entering. He made a distinguished career for himself, is a decorated war veteran and retired at an early age with a pension.This should NOT be about anyone else's experiences with or feelings about the military...just make an informed decision for yourself.
     
  9. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Wait, so you are already a full-time teacher and you want to join the reserves in order to finance another degree? Will you go in as an officer or enlisted?

    I was a reservist for the first seven years of my teaching career.

    It was not fun at all. After teaching all week, your ENTIRE weekend gets taken up and you go back to teaching. I could not wait until I had my 20 years and retired. I do not miss it.

    When I was in, my school district was quite understandable however, I never had to take much time off because most of what I did was when we were off or during weekends.

    The being a reservist was great when I was in college and did not really have a full time job. But once I had a full time job, it got old really fast. I think you can make more money doing something else during the summer.
     
  10. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Phenom

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    Perhaps, but I'm plumb out of ideas about what I could do that would make enough money. Tuition is DARN expensive these days and finding jobs for just the summer is pretty tough. Especially ones that really pay anything.
     
  11. MikeTeachesMath

    MikeTeachesMath Devotee

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    Financial aid? Loans? Scholarships? Grants?
     
  12. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Have you filled out a FAFSA. To see what you qualify for?
     
  13. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    My sister is an officer in the Navy. She teaches at a nuclear school. She not only has a SWEET job (I'm talking like half days every day and making BANK. And of course students who are respectful OR ELSE) but she has the GI bill for when she gets out. She's currently deciding between going to med school, getting a PhD, or going to Germany for further education.

    All for free of course.

    I think it's an AWESOME opportunity. But you gotta do it the right way-- be an officer. Don't go in enlisted. An officer like my sister (a teacher, or a nurse, or a lawyer, etc) will never ever be sent away. Ever.
     
  14. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Really? There's PLENTY of nurses on the front lines....and instructors have often seen 'action' before hitting the classroom. It's not a 'sweet deal' for everyone, regardless of rank.
     
  15. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    No. Not if you go straight into OTS. Instead of enlisting.

    It IS a sweet deal. I would encourage anyone to go into it. My sister has never even held a gun. And she's been in the Navy for going on 3 years. There's plenty of parts of the military that don't fight. They need paper pushers too.
     
  16. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    My dh went to the Naval Academy. He's a retired O5 (16 years as an officer) There are some specialty areas that may not require ever handling a gun ( in the Navy it tends to be more missiles than guns), but the OP presumably wouldn't have those special training under his belt....and as a way to finance a few college classes, the OP wouldn't necessarily be on a career path...more likely a warm body to fill a drill slot...and easily called up as needed.
     
  17. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    That's why I said if you go in as an officer. Go through OTS. Not going through enlistment. If you enlist you will be a "warm body to fill a drill slot". If you go to OTS you will have the specialized training that will keep you out of harms way.
     
  18. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Phenom

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    I've already gotten my bachelor's and a credential using the FAFSA. I believe that means some of the grants I would have qualified for are used up. I don't want to take out any more loans. I will certainly apply for more scholarships and grants, but these rarely come in amounts that are large enough to make a huge impact. But they do add up.

    I would love to contribute in some way that would be useful to the country. If I would have to go to the front-lines I would have to go to the front lines, but I was thinking National Guard Reservist here.

    National Guard is usually run by states to take care of things like wild-fires, emergency relief, and civil engineering type things.

    But to be honest my main priority is to be able to fund a higher education and possibly more degrees in the future.
     
  19. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Lucy...I spent 16 years as an active duty Naval officer's spouse. I raised two 'Navy brats'. I lived in military housing, navigated military medicine, served as an ombudsman, welcomed home many ships, buried friends, have friends who died in 'sweet' jobs in the Pentagon on 9/11, still have military benefits... I know what the life is. But evidently I have no idea what I'm talking about despite living that life....You can believe what you want. You can give the advice you want. There is no 'out of harms way' in the military. Go Navy. Semper Fi. Ooooo- rah....
     
  20. Accountable

    Accountable Companion

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    Yup. That, and how many sweet nuclear officer school teacher jobs are there?

    I served just short of 21 years enlisted in the Air Force, through Desert Shield, Desert Storm, and the beginning of the Afghanistan War. I never saw combat. I never saw SandLand. But I was lucky.

    The experiences I gained there have served me immeasurably in the classroom, both in terms of breadth of real world stories to relate to lessons and in classroom management.
     

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