Alternative Careers for Teachers

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Emmy, Jun 9, 2011.

  1. Emmy

    Emmy Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    159
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2011

    What are some alternative careers for teachers outside of a school setting? With school districts only hiring displaced and laid off teachers I feel I must consider other options. I would prefer something full time, and that pays decent, so tutoring and child-care jobs are not an option for me because of the low pay. Any ideas?
     
  2.  
  3. js15206

    js15206 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2011
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2011

    I feel the same way. I can't even find a job at Home Depot right now. I have 10 years teaching and nothing, just letters saying that we regret to inform you that you were not selected.

    I just applied to be a car salesman and I believe I got the job. I can't believe how bad things are. Even my friends that are teachers with secure jobs are miserable. They have all suffered pay cuts and rising health care costs.

    This is a bad time for teachers and I hate to say I think it will get worse.

    I am finding it so difficult to transfer to an industry career and not teach. But I have a wife and daughter to provide for.
     
  4. amyt682

    amyt682 Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2006
    Messages:
    276
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2011

    zoos, museums, nature centers...places you might field trip
     
  5. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    Messages:
    5,641
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2011

    I'm in banking.
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,640
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jun 9, 2011

    I do lots of freelance writing.

    You could look into working for ETS or any of the educational publishers.
     
  7. Ms.teach

    Ms.teach Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2009
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 9, 2011

    I was turned down from Target recently. Unfortunately, some interviewers seem the think that you can only teach with a degree in education. Honestly, we're awesome multi-taskers and managers.

    I did find a tutoring position that was full time (no benefits though) and I was paid teacher pay. It was in a public school so keep your eyes peeled for opportunities like that. The downside was no benefits and if children weren't there I was not paid.

    Hospitals are worth looking into. I scored an interview for an administrative position with decent pay/ benefits and unfortunately was not chosen.

    Rehabilitation centers for juveniles need educators from what I hear too. I'm returning back to school for a new career should I not find employment this summer but before I literally applied to everything that seemed like it might have benefits and decent pay.
     
  8. jcar03

    jcar03 Companion

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2011
    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 10, 2011

    I am worried about not getting hired. My plan for the fall if I am not employed is to continue subbing in my area. I got plenty of calls from March until the end of May between a school and a co-op program. I may look into a part time job that I can work nights and weekends but I don't want to take myself out of the education area. Luckily, I am still living at home so I don't have to worry about some of the other issues of rent and the like.
     
  9. LUCHopefulTeach

    LUCHopefulTeach Habitué

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2011
    Messages:
    781
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 10, 2011

    You can always be an aide or a sub for the year while looking for a full time position.
     
  10. Emmy

    Emmy Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    159
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 10, 2011

    I did sub this past year and it led to nowhere cause my district along with all districts in my area are on a hiring freeze. Plus no benefits. Teacher aides are paid so lowly ($16,000 a year or less).

    I do live at home so I don't have to worry about rent right now. But I hate living at home, and am 30 years old and feel its time to move out. I can't just wait for the economy to get better and finally move out when I'm 35. Got to start living my own life away from home.

    I really don't know what I'll do. I've looked at the museums in my area, and none have any education jobs available right now and I just can't sit home and wait for one to turn up. Thinking I may even try to get a job as a receptionist just so I can start making money and move out.
     
  11. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1,576
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jun 10, 2011

    I worked part time as a Christian Ed director at 2 different churches while being a SAHM. They were in pretty high demand - I had 2 churches bidding for me when I relocated. Now, there are more colleges offering it as a major but when I got my jobs, they were specifically looking for education majors. Some of the churches have day cares and require an education degree to oversee the general operations as well.
     
  12. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Messages:
    6,848
    Likes Received:
    327

    Jun 10, 2011

    When I didn't have a teaching job right out of college, I took a customer service position for a major insurance / finance institution and learned finance well enough to create a secondary resume. CSRs who can cut through a customer's emotion to find the question are worth training with the answers.
     
  13. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    Messages:
    5,641
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 10, 2011

    Every single day I hear "Why aren't you a teacher? You make this stuff make so much sense!" Ummmm, well....you see...I AM a teacher. Don't get me started. At any rate, it makes me good at my job. I spend my days figuring out what went wrong, or why something happened the way it did, then explaining it to bankers in a way that they're able to turn around and explain it to customers. I've had several of the higher ups tell me that they actively look for out of work teachers for that very reason.
     
  14. ahodge79

    ahodge79 Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2009
    Messages:
    223
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 10, 2011

    I'm not sure where you live, but preschool jobs in school districts (title 5) actually pay a lot if you can get one (a few thousand a month). You have to have the classes and get an early childhood permit though. I student taught in kindergarten and they applied that as my experience. just a thought in case that's a possibilty. I worked at a children's museum on the floor too and although it was very low paying, they always offered the "floor employees" the upper level jobs first.
     
  15. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    5,562
    Likes Received:
    40

    Jun 11, 2011

    I don't know how many of you are willing to rtn to school, but it's worth considering. You may not want to get a 2nd Masters degree like I'm working on now for Speech-Lang Pathology, but a Speech-Lang Path Assistant requires a bachelor's in the communication disorders field & if your degree's in something else, most schools will allow you to take a list of prereq courses, which is a lot shorter than working on another whole bachelor's. THEN, you do have to complete a (normally 2-yr) SLPA program.

    Hey, it's quicker than getting another whole Bachelor's or Masters if you want as little extra college as possible! I'm just giving suggestions! :)

    I find it a real shame that teachers can't even seem to get retail, customer service, restaurant type jobs. I mean we're way overly qualified for it! Maybe they think us teachers will walk around like we're the boss & be on a high horse or something OR will request too much pay when they ask what our desired pay is. I personally always say on applications that I'll take the prevailing rate. I'm trying to get the job 1st. It's NOT the time to act like I'm all high & mighty & they can't afford me.

    A couple of summers ago (after I had my MA degree), I applied to a big clothing store (SteinMart). Now I hadn't worked in retail for over 10 yrs. I think the interviewing mgr thought I was smug & that I could do even a mgr's job, which I know I could do, but I was NOT smug or had a chip on my shoulder, etc. Needless to say, I didn't get the job.
     
  16. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Messages:
    1,256
    Likes Received:
    2

    Jun 12, 2011

    Center Director of a preschool is close if not the same as teaching. Also, working as a director to a YMCA is as well. A part time tutor is probably not going to pay the bills but if you were a director of a tutoring center that would be something different.
     
  17. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Messages:
    5,068
    Likes Received:
    146

    Jun 12, 2011

    Ms. I, I think one of the big reasons employers don't want to hire people that are over-qualified is simply because they know that person will leave as soon as they find a job in their "real" field. If I hadn't found a teaching job last year, I would have taken a minimum wage job just for the sheer fact that some money is better than no money- but you can bet I would have been "real" job searching the whole time and out the door the second I got offered anything even related to education. Employers don't want to hire someone that is still actively looking for another job and will leave the second they get it.
     
  18. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    5,562
    Likes Received:
    40

    Jun 12, 2011

    waterfall, yep, I've thought of that reason too & I do think that's the main reason. :)
     
  19. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    Messages:
    5,641
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 12, 2011

    Another job type I just thought if: Corporate Training.
     
  20. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Messages:
    6,848
    Likes Received:
    327

    Jun 12, 2011

    The problem with that is most companies require that you work your way into that position over years. I wanted to go into training at Big Insurance Company but was told the pool of applicants was insane.
     
  21. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2009
    Messages:
    1,407
    Likes Received:
    16

    Jun 12, 2011

    First off, this is a great thread and thanks for starting it.

    I would be interested in starting on a Masters... the problem is, I feel like it would be a waste of time (e.g. getting an M.Ed). It's not that I think districts might prefer just a Bachelors or anything like that. I just think it's a waste of time, in terms of my potential for landing a job. It's like putting another layer onto a cake that no one is going to eat anyway.

    Teaching opportunities are dead. That's the sick thing. Now you might get a people here or there who say otherwise (and post here how they got a job! etc.) But that's not the reality to the rest of the people. So to put more effort into trying to look attractive for an opportunity that not going to come, I think it's a mistake. (e.g. to get a Masters of Curriculum). And I would feel like I'm actually being a bit irresponsible and ignorant by doing that.

    But I would like to start on a Masters, one that is meaningful outside of teaching. Something in agriculture maybe, something in cyberspace (e.g.cybersecurity), etc. The problem with those of course, is that my track wasn't in those areas (making the course that much longer).
     

Share This Page

test