ALICE Drill

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Miz_Jay, Sep 19, 2014.

  1. Miz_Jay

    Miz_Jay Companion

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    Sep 19, 2014

    The teachers had our very first ALICE drill after school today. Even though I'm only a sub, the principal wanted me to participate since I'm in a long term position.

    We all knew that the drill would take place at 3:30 and of course we all knew what to do. But at the first sound of the cap gun and the principal coming over the intercom to let us know where the 'shooter' was located, my heart started to race and my hands started to shake.

    The 'shooter' was in the main hall and as it happens, my class is in the main hall, so I got to do lock down. As I was locking down, I caught a glimpse of the 'shooter' - played by the director of student services - coming down the hall and it was even more scary. As I stood at the back of my classroom, my heart was racing. Like I knew it would be an experience, but I wasn't expecting the pure fear that I felt.

    All I could think was how do you do this with students? How do you move them to the back of the room, lock the door, turn out the lights and pull all the shades at the same time. All while keeping them absolutely silent.

    Has anyone else gone through an ALICE drill yet this year?
     
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  3. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Our P just went to an ALICE training, so we'll be rolling it out soon.
    As for me, I'm usually a very slow reactor, and I stay absolutely calm. To the point that I think I'm underreacting, and it's not a good thing. I'll be curious to see how it is if the practice is the same way.
     
  4. SF_Giants66

    SF_Giants66 Cohort

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    Sep 19, 2014

    Is that like a Brady Bunch housekeeping drill?
     
  5. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    No. It's about what to do if there is a shooter at the school. Serious stuff, especially in light of what's happened in the last few years.
     
  6. bewlove

    bewlove Companion

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    I was laying in bed last night thinking about what I would do if there was a shooter in my school. I'm in the back of my school, which brings me a little solace, you know, unless they come through the back. I was thinking about how truly terrifying that would be. How even if I pull my shades, the shooter could just shoot the glass and open my door.

    Mostly, I was thinking about the kids. Nowhere in my room is particularly out of harms way. I think I would shove as many kids in my closet as possible, and lock them in. Then, I think I would stand by the door with a chair, hopefully hidden, and that as they came in I would just hit them as hard as I could with the chair before they could react.

    Really, I was also just thinking that I wish every school has an armed guard.
     
  7. Loveslabs

    Loveslabs Companion

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    Sep 19, 2014

    I have the exact same reaction every time we practice. When the kids are there for the practice I am actually calmer. I believe this is because I am focused on them, so I don't have time to think about anything else.
     
  8. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I have high schoolers so they help me. They pull the shades while I make sure the door is locked.

    I've been through ALICE training and vastly prefer it to the sitting duck method.
     
  9. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    We are required to keep our doors locked, it's a pain, but it is for our safety. Most of us don't have shades, so it's a matter of turning out the lights & getting away from the door. Of course, someone looking into the rooms from outside can see who is in the room.
     
  10. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    My principal has already been trained.

    However, next week, the teachers and I will go through ALICE training.
     
  11. Miz_Jay

    Miz_Jay Companion

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    Sep 19, 2014

    I have no idea when or if we'll be practicing with kids in the building, but I hope it's not anytime soon. I know they need to experience it though.

    I couldn't imagine the pain in the butt keeping the door locked at all times would be. Especially when kids are in and out of the room with SPED and enrichment and various other things. But I understand the safety behind it. Most teachers in the school I'm in don't even shut their doors during instruction!

    In my district, all the upper admins went through training during the summer and regular classroom teachers did it at the beginning of the school year. The district is still trying to decide when/how they want to train subs in it. They know they want to but as a general we aren't part of the regular school environment so it's more difficult.
     
  12. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    We just did this drill, which we call Code Black, and there were good and bad elements. In our school, all doors are locked at all times, so one less thing to worry about.. My room, however, has a window in the door, and then sizable windows at ground level on two other sides of the room. It is difficult to get the blinds closed and find the safest place to position the students for their safety. If an intruder has scoped out the building, there are two rooms like my own that are not easily defended, or, rather, where the students can be defended properly. I have no area that can be defended or the students made safer behind barriers. It is a little scary and I try to remain calm for the students, while relaying the information that we need to take this drill seriously. This is not a one size fits all kind of exercise.
     
  13. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    Sep 20, 2014

    I dread these trainings. It is so hard for me because I was next door at VT. We had a lock down because of a bank robbery last year and it was so hard for me to hold it together.
     
  14. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    We do lock down drills, so the kids know what to do. They know it's a drill, but it's taken seriously. I think if I didn't know it was a drill I would be scared, but of course that would be all the more reason to get the kids to wear they need to be and keep them silent, for our safety. In the event of a real emergency the kids would do as they've been trained and they would stay silent, because they know they have to- its part of the drill just like it's part of a fire drill.

    One question though- you said because your classroom is in the main hallway you had to go into lock down. In the event of a shooter, wouldn't EVERY classroom go into lock down?
     
  15. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    This is so true for me too. I'm almost glad we haven't practiced without the kids.
     
  16. DrivingPigeon

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    Teachers went through a 2-hour ALICE training before school started. The principals did an entire day training this summer. We haven't been training on what to do during a drill yet, though. I think that's coming next month, and then we'll have a drill with students.

    I'm nervous about what the drill will look like, since ALICE training really shows you that you can't plan what to do in this type of situation. You have a quickly assess what's going on, and make the best decision for you and your students. Scary stuff.
     
  17. DrivingPigeon

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    ALICE training teaches you through statistics and research that hiding in your classroom (if that's what you mean by "lock down") is actually more dangerous than fleeing the building.
     
  18. Miz_Jay

    Miz_Jay Companion

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    Sep 20, 2014

    Every classroom wouldn't go into lock down. It depends on where your classroom is located in relation to the shooter. For example since our school is two level if the shooter is on the main floor, everyone on the lower level would evacuate because it's safer for them to get out.

    Or like yesterday during our drill, it was announced that the shooter was on the main floor moving towards the John St door. So the principal wanted the people on the opposite side o the floor to evacuate too.
     
  19. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    Sep 20, 2014

    We have a "lock down" drill next week. I actually have no idea what that means. When I've done it before it meant simply taking a red or green card and taping it to the door. I wonder if it's more now. I'll make sure to ask on Monday!
     
  20. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    When conferring about my room's arrangement, we discussed the fact that we really are like fish in a barrel, since I have no egress to the exterior of the building. Even my windows have no escape screens on them. Many of the other rooms are close enough to outside doors to exit the building, but about 6 of our rooms lack any exit that would be safer than being unprotected in the main hall with a shooter. You better believe that this has given me pause - how do I save their lives and keep them safe from harm?
     
  21. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Would the location of the shooter actually be announced during a real situation? We are supposed to tape a card in the window of our classrooms to indicate how many people are inside, but again, in a real situation who is roaming the halls checking and why am I at the window marking attendance instead of protecting my kids?

    It's scary to think about all the possible scenarios and what we would ACTUALLY do.
     

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