Advice Please-Asked to Resign-So Many Questions

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by AmericanRose, Jan 28, 2018.

  1. AmericanRose

    AmericanRose New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    2

    Jan 28, 2018

    A Little Bit About Myself: I am a veteran teacher, who has been teaching secondary school for about seven years. Although, I've taught a bit of everything as a substitute,which I did for two years after graduating from college. I work hard and care about my students more than anything. I do hold them to standards, and if they don't meet the objectives, they fail the class. I teach ELA and Speech. I've taught at two schools: one for three years and the other (current) for four. All of my evaluations and walkthroughs have been exemplary. Also, I've never been fired or laid off from a position (any job) until now.


    The Situation: I was called on something but it was a minor infraction. I panicked and initially lied about it. Then, I admitted to it. I do know that it was wrong to lie. I admitted to the whole thing and feel awful. It undermined my relationship with my administration and betrayed their trust-a critical element in education. On one hand, I was told I couldn't be trusted and on the other that they had compassion for me and I had done great things for the school.

    The History: However, I'm not certain if this is really why I was asked to resign. We have an administrator who singles teachers out and bullies them. I've been one of these teachers. I know this person has been trying to get me let go since I was hired. He/She has threatened and went to the higher ups on multiple occasions but nothing has stuck. He/She has accused me of being too hard for my students who have special needs or are ESL. (I am one of the only ESL teachers on campus who actually loves teaching ESL) There were conversations with me about not passing certain athletes and not referring certain students to the office, despite the fact that they had cussed me out in front of the class. I also caught this admin doing a students homework for him when I went to drop something off in the office...the list could go on. And finally, I had a really tough last year. Essentially, last year, I divorced my husband and my dad died. I just wonder if they think I'm a sinking ship. I admit it got bad (graded papers late and didn't communicate as much with parents) for a little while, but I've pulled myself together.

    Questions:
    1. How bad is this? Are teachers allowed to make mistakes?
    2. Has this happened to any of you? What did you do? What would you do?
    3. Does this mean that I will never be able to teach again?
    4. What is the best way to explain this to a potential employer?

    I'm not angry with my administrator but completely confused and broad-sided. Thanks in advance.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2018
  2.  
  3. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2012
    Messages:
    2,859
    Likes Received:
    619

    Jan 28, 2018

    Do you have union representation? If not you should resign. If you do, ask them to negotiate some kind of settlement (where you will still end up resigning).

    Maybe they can negotiate a letter of recommendation based on your teaching abilities. While I’m not sure language about selling things to children would be in your contract, I’m sure they can find something to cover it.

    You screwed up. It happens. When interviewing, I wouldn’t bring this story up. You are just looking for a better fit.
     
    AmericanRose likes this.
  4. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    6,557
    Likes Received:
    1,507

    Jan 28, 2018

    This is bad on multiple levels, and you have made the kind of choices, and then showed lack of honesty about your actions, that makes your judgments as a teacher questionable. If you had snacks left, and if the proceeds go to the students, why not just give away any remaining "stock" instead of charging for it, when you had been told to stop? Those are just the provable facts. Good luck proving what you purport to be the ulterior motive for your resignation, because your own admission is that last year you were a less than stellar teacher. I suspect you were already walking on thin ice, but you proceeded to defy admin.

    See if your teacher's union can help, but don't be too surprised if they try to distance themselves from this chain of events. I don't see a great defense for this chain of events, personally. You may want to get more info from your current employer, and try to look at this sequence of events through their eyes.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2018
  5. AmericanRose

    AmericanRose New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    2

    Jan 28, 2018

    Thank you. Yes, you're right. It showed a complete lack of judgment on multiple levels.I appreciate your input.
     
    futuremathsprof and AlwaysAttend like this.
  6. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2012
    Messages:
    2,859
    Likes Received:
    619

    Jan 28, 2018

    As bad as you screwed up, and as bad as you feel at the moment, plenty have done worse but still met the same professional fate. The anxious feeling in your stomach will one day subside and you can decide if you want to pursue another teaching job.
     
    AmericanRose likes this.

Share This Page

test