Activities to teach shapes

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Preschool0929, Jan 22, 2017.

  1. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    Jan 22, 2017

    I teach public preschool (3-5) and last week during our mid-year assessments noticed that a majority of my students are still not able to identify basic shapes. We're supposed to be moving on to 3D shapes, but I know we're not ready.

    Any great activities or math programs that your students have really enjoyed to teach shapes?
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2017
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  3. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Devotee

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    Jan 22, 2017

    Use the "we're going on a bear hunt " song

    We're going on a shape Hunt (2x)
    I'm not afraid (2x)
    I've got my thinking cap on (2x)
    Ohhh look, what shape is this?! (Hold up 1 shape)

    There's also:
    There's a shape on the floor, a shape on the floor, who can tell me what it is, theres a shape on the floor..
    (All the shapes are laid out on the floor, the kids sit in a circle around it, after the song, you pick a child to pick up one shape to tell the class what shape it is)
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jan 22, 2017

    Lots of time with blocks, felt shapes on the feltboard, shapes in the sand table, shape hunts.... don't be driven by 'we need to move on to 3D shapes'. Focus on developmentally appropriate hands on experiences and make it fun They are little for such a short time. They will not be behind in kindergarten if they don't know what a cylinder is...o_O
     
    Obadiah likes this.
  5. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    Jan 22, 2017

    Thanks for the suggestions. We've done all those activities on a weekly basis, but it's not clicking for most. When I say "we need to move on", it's just part of our math curriculum, not me pushing them past where is developmentally appropriate. I'm looking for more of a researched based or sensory based approach to teaching shapes. Most of my students have special needs, so often times I need a more direct instruction approach to teaching concepts
     
  6. TeacherCuriousExplore

    TeacherCuriousExplore Cohort

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    Feb 11, 2017

    Hi I know this is a little late, but try to go over them in circle time each day.Get a shape poster in hang it in your circle time wall or area. I did this and it taught each kid their shapes.Have a shape of the week. Find books, songs, and finger plays to do for each shape of the week.
     
  7. Numa

    Numa New Member

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    Feb 20, 2017

    Hi, could this help?
    https://jig.space/view?jig=571
    They might be a bit young but kids love playing with these little 3d jigs. If they have an ipad / computer at home they could explore more.
     
  8. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Feb 21, 2017

    Along with with direct instruction, I would recommend increasing indirect, informal hands on opportunities. Early mathematics, in my opinion, is sometimes hindered by modern society; kids do not have as many opportunities for actual encounters with mathematical concepts; instead, they are restricted to TV (research shows much less learning from TV than real life exposure for this age) and less exposure to outside play than previous generations (alongside of indoor activities, outdoors activities provide even more opportunities for mathematical development). The brain packs away and develops information from informal activities to mesh those neuron developments with classroom lessons and activities. The ideas below are not strictly 2-D, but I would feel important for both 2-D and 3-D geometry lessons. Alongside of jungle gyms (that have specific geometric shapes to hold it together), swing sets (the back and forth movement is based on 2-D geometry), playing with a ball (spheres), additional activities could include hula hoops (especially brain friendly because as they turn the shape actually changes but the eyes register it as still being circular), beach balls and other sizes of spheres to play with, building blocks that include triangular shapes, peg boards for (safe) elastic loops to create informal designs, shadow puppets, Ring Around the Rosie and other group games with shapes, etc.
     

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