Activities for homeroom?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by jamoehope, Oct 2, 2010.

  1. jamoehope

    jamoehope Companion

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    Oct 2, 2010

    I'm a brand new Resource teacher at a middle school. I JUST started last Tuesday! For the remaining week I have my resource students in a 15 minute homeroom period at the beginning of the day. The teacher before me said she did review activities in homeroom but I am not yet familiar with what is going on in the classrooms. What sort of activities can I do with them for the rest of the week?
     
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  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Oct 2, 2010

    I would take some time to read aloud to them, re-teach basic math concepts (multiplication, division, etc), have them journal, read silently, check their assignment notebooks.

    Maybe on a different note-teach some organization or study strategies to the students. Many middle school students don't know how to use their assignment notebook, read a textbook, or study for a test...
     
  4. Reality Check

    Reality Check Habitué

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    Oct 2, 2010

    Activities......for HOMEROOM??? Have them raise their hand and say, "Present." (Just kidding. It just struck me odd that homeroom would be for anything but attendance-taking.)
     
  5. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Oct 2, 2010

    http://charactercounts.org/lesson-plans/index.html

    Our school wants us to have a very productive homeroom. I started using the Character Counts lessons last week. What a difference. The kids found the topics very engaging. I supplemented the lesson plans with powerpoints.

    It could be a good way to start the day in a positive manner.
     
  6. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    Oct 3, 2010

    Our resource room teacher has all her students check in with her at homeroom. They must show her the homework and she helps them be organized. She writes missing assignments in the agenda books and reminders about studying in red pencil. She sees them at the end of the day as well and works on things like the difference between rotation and revolution. It seems to be working. You'll soon know what's going on in each class.
     
  7. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Oct 3, 2010

    When I had a homeroom that was long enough for activities, I did logic puzzles and riddles. The kids loved them. It was fun, it got their brains going, and it wasn't "work" :D. I'd give them the answers at the end of the day, though my homeroom kiddos were always welcome to swing by during lunch or passing periods to ask if they got the right answer.
     
  8. jamoehope

    jamoehope Companion

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    Oct 3, 2010

    Thanks for all the ideas! I will be sure to try some of them.

    I think I badly need to talk with the kids about respect too. I know that part of my issue with the kids being rude in the morning is the lack of structure, so your ideas on thing to do will help with that issue. BUT I have two kids who are especially rude and rubbing off the wrong way on the others.

    Two of my homeroom students are ones I had in 6th grade when they are I were at a nearby elementary school. They are disrespectful to me (talking back, not following directions the first time, calling out, etc.). The boy especially is confrontational with me and I want to avoid power struggles.

    So I was wondering how to set my rules and consequences better in such a short amount of time everyday.

    And what can I do to work on respect with the other students even if these two students are going to choose to misbehave?
     
  9. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Oct 3, 2010

    Have whole class and individual rewards. Whole class might be working for lunch, extra free time, no homework, etc. Maybe write letters on the board that spell out something special, fill a jar of pebbles, add clips to a poster, etc. Individual rewards might be tickets for a drawing, dollars to be spent at a store, etc.

    I would write out and post your rules. Then discuss them with the students. Know the consequences of the school and explain these to the students (hopefully they know them), this way they know that you know them as well. Then use the consequences in place. If none are in place, make your own. Be sure you can follow through though.
     
  10. jamoehope

    jamoehope Companion

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    Oct 3, 2010

    Thanks for the tips. I don't know all the consequences of the school yet so that's actually something I want to ask tomorrow.

    I was thinking for whole group reward to let the students get out early by thirty seconds and write the word "THIRTY" on the board. Then if I have students acting out I'll tell them they lost a letter (where a letter is 5 seconds). Would this work well enough? I'm also not sure what to do about individual rewards since the time is so short and I don't necessarily see all of them again that day.

    As for activities, I like the logic puzzles/brain teasers ideas. Just got to find ones for middle school kids and ones that are not too difficult in terms of reading levels. I also think I'll use some of the Skills for Success lessons for study skills. So we can watch the TV announcements, do a Skills for Success lesson or mini-lesson, and a brain teaser.

    Reality Check: You would think that just saying "present" would be enough, but even in 15 minutes that is enough for the kids too goof off if they have nothing to do!
     
  11. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Oct 3, 2010

    Are you allowed to do that at your school? At mine we can't. We would get into biiiig trouble if we did. It's one of the Rules You Don't Break.

    A few people might have said this, but I think some good activities could include study skills, memorization techniques (body pegs, etc.), writing practice (like journaling), and character-building. The Tiger Woods Foundation used to give away a huge binder with resources for teachers about building character. I got two of them for free just by asking. Maybe you could google that and find out if you can get your hands on that? Might be a good starting place.
     
  12. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Oct 3, 2010

    If you are allowed to dismiss early I think it might be a great reward. Middle school students love free time. I would leave yourself an opportunity to change the reward. Let the students know that this is what you will start with, and if it works you might ask for other ideas...
    Also, feel free to throw in an extra bonus time if they are truly doing what you wish (maybe move 30 seconds to 45 if they are truly acting as you wish, especially at the beginning.)
     
  13. jamoehope

    jamoehope Companion

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    Oct 3, 2010

    Hmm, I don't know if we CAN let the kids out early. I just saw another teacher offer it as a group reward when I was pushing into his class. What other group reward can I offer then? Talking to one another at the end of homeroom?

    I would like to do character building but I think I need to focus on re-establishing my own rules and consequences first. Which I'm still trying to figure out how to do. :/
     
  14. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Phenom

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    Oct 4, 2010

    I do character education and teambuilding activities with my students. Kagan has some really good teambuilding activities.
     

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