A pre-k class in need of behavior management

Discussion in 'Behavior Management Archives' started by emerald115, Dec 16, 2006.

  1. emerald115

    emerald115 Rookie

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    Dec 16, 2006

    Hi Guys!
    I am a new pre-k teacher and after doing some research it looks like a positively based system works best, like a sticker chart. However, I have some kids in the class that would not respond to this. They respond to consequences like sitting out for part of recess. How can I incorporate consequences into the sticker chart system? Or, is there another system that would be better. Also, After how many stickers should they receive a prize?

    Thanks!
     
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  3. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    Dec 16, 2006

    How to incorporate consequences into a sticker chart:

    Set a threshold they have to cross before getting recess. Every day they have to behave well in some preset number of categories, or they forfeit part of their recess. One sticker per good behavior. If you don't get (for example) three stickers by morning, you lose 1/2 of recess. You need at least three stickers to earn your recess.

    Now, if you are like me and don't see recess as a reward, then I urge you to reconsider using a lack of recess as a punishment. I mean, consequence.
     
  4. teach2004

    teach2004 Companion

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    Dec 16, 2006

    I give a sticker if they have had a good day. If they have to sit in time-out at any time during the day, they do not receive a sticker. When they have 5 stickers, they get to choose something from my treasure box. This works for me. Understand that I try to redirect instead of using time-outs, but sometimes they just need a time-out. Also the time-out gives me a chance to talk to them about their behavior and re-explain what is expected of them.
     
  5. synapse

    synapse Comrade

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    Dec 17, 2006

    I would be cautious about basing your entire behavior management program on a system of tangible reinforcers. The problem with this approach is that, for the student, the focus is on the reinforcer, not the behavior. Before you know it, you will ask your students to do something and their reply will be "what do I get?" Tangible reinforcers have their place (I think you may choose go to them when other options are not working), but if you decide to use them, use the lowest level of reinforcer necessary to get the job done and (I can't emphasize this enough) have a plan for eliminating the tangible reinforcers.
     
  6. emerald115

    emerald115 Rookie

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    Dec 19, 2006

    Synapse,
    What could I use to reinforce the behavior if it is not tangible?
     
  7. synapse

    synapse Comrade

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    Dec 19, 2006

    Social reinforcers, such as:
    Verbal praise
    classroom responsibilities
    one on one time with a preferred adult
    one on one time with a preferred classmate
    time to engage in a preferred activity

    When you find consequences are necessary, use logical consequences. For example, if a student creates a mess, they have to clean up the mess.

    I think re-directing is a good strategy, particularly at this developmental level. I was wondering how you defined "a good day", or what your criteria for earning a sticker is. I also wondered how a student "earned" a time-out.
     

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