A list of consequences that are used at a charter school

Discussion in 'General Education' started by schoolteacher, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Nov 16, 2012

    I was reading about a local charter school in my city that is doing very well academically compared to the public school where I teach. The socioeconomic level of the population is somewhat higher than that of our school population.

    Comparing these 2 schools, it is easy to see exactly why this school is doing so much better than ours.

    The teachers at this school can actually teach, because they have effective consequences for the behaviors listed below. In my school, most of these behaviors would have no consequences. Most would receive no attention at all from an administrator.

    Similar student population, vastly different results. Give us an equal playing field, and I guarantee you we would look just as good academically.

    Behavior
    • Aggressive language (including cursing) • Bullying* • Defiance
    • Deliberately throwing chairs, furniture,
    school property* • Destruction of property (major) • Endangering self or others • Extortion • Fighting* • Harassing another student* • Inappropriate use of the Internet
    • Inappropriate touching* • Instigating a Fight or Assault*
    • Making threats
    • Not following directions during safety drills
    • Plagiarism/Cheating
    • Physical Violence*
    • Spitting on another person intentionally
    • Stealing or assisting another student who is
    stealing
    • Tantrums that disrupt learning and/or
    make the class feel unsafe*
    • Vandalism
    • Walking out of class


    Possible Consequences
    (More than one consequence may be assigned)
    The following may apply to all behaviors listed in the
    column to the left:
    • The student will be immediately removed from
    the classroom and sent to the Dean’s Office.
    • Student will Take a Break and reflect on the
    incident.
    • Student will discuss and practice expected
    behavior with Dean of Students.
    • Mediation between all participants. This will
    include a chance to “fix” relationships or
    objects.
    • Parent may be called by the Dean of Students.
    Parent may be asked to speak with the student
    at the time of the call to discuss the behavior
    and expectations.
    • A letter, documenting the incident, will be
    given to the parent. Parent is expected to sign
    and return the letter on the next school day.
    • Student may lose a privilege.
    • Student may be given an assignment to be done
    at home.
    • Student may be given after-school community
    service.
    • Student may be assigned after-school detention.
    • Student may be assigned Saturday School.
    • Student may be sent home. Parent will be asked
    to come to school and take the student home
    within one and-a-half hours.
    • Student may be suspended out of school
    between 1 and 3 days, not including the day of
    the incident.
    • Parent meeting will be required.
    • Student may be placed on Behavioral Probation
     
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  3. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Nov 16, 2012

    I think you've highlighted one of the most important component of innovation and charter schools - that good ideas need to be exported from that setting and imported into other venues. So, if a novel behavior management policy proves effective in a charter school (or any school), there needs to be a process of dissemination and consideration in which other schools import that practice or at least consider it.
     
  4. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Nov 16, 2012

    I don't think it's a question of innovation, or of exporting good ideas. And I wouldn't call this behavior management policy novel.

    It's a question of money. Our school has exactly one administrator. There is no Dean of Students, or any staff member who can man a time out room. Our principal spends her day putting out fires. A charter school has an entire fire department to put out their fires.
     
  5. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Nov 16, 2012

    THIS charter school does. We definitely did not have that when I worked in a charter. I actually feel more supported this year in a regular public school.
     
  6. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Fanatic

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    Nov 17, 2012

    I live in a state that has as many charter schools as any other state in the nation. I was actually excited at first to see this. Now I am absolutely appalled how about 3/4 of the charter schools I know are horrible. Many charter schools take advantage that many parents feel charter schools must be better than public schools. Many charter schools are very chaotic with few rules being enforced. One charter school had a principal who had never even been a teacher. The nightmares that went on in that school would make your blood boil. (I know this from parents who had students at this school, and I have met the principal as well.)

    Don't get me wrong. There are some excellent charter schools in our state, and I'm sure in other states. Saying a school is better or worse because it is a charter or public school shows no evidence. The charter school that is described by schoolteacher's post is not the norm that I have seen.
     
  7. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Nov 17, 2012

    I did not intend for this discussion to become one that compares public to charter schools in general.

    I was comparing one local charter school that has met with success with the public school where I teach, that has met with failure.

    I was curious to see what they did differently. Was there something that they implemented at their school that we could possibly do at my school?

    I looked at their website and saw exactly what made the difference. I would love to have that kind of support for the very challenging behaviors I encounter at my school.
     
  8. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Fanatic

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    Nov 17, 2012

    True, you did not make this comparison. I just see so many states who are beginning to adopt charter schools not see what has happened with them in the last 15+ years. I agree that with that kind of support from admin. it makes a great difference for any school.
     
  9. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Nov 17, 2012

    I'd like to know how you know they have more money than your school. Most charter schools spend far less money per student than traditional public schools do.

    This isn't about money at all. It is about priorities.
     
  10. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Nov 17, 2012

    I am making the assumption that the charter school has more money than we are allocated based on information from their website. They have a lower student to teacher ratio than we do, have aides for all of their K-5 classes, and have a dean who exclusively handles discipline.

    Notice that I said that they have more money than "we are allocated". While the money spent per student in our district may appear to be higher, that money is not actually available to our school to be used for the benefit of the students. That money goes to the bloated administrative monster known as the district office and disappears into the many layers of bureaucracy .

    The priorities of our school, the hopes and dreams of our students and their families, have nothing to do with the priorities of the administrators of our school district. Yes, it is about money.
     
  11. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Nov 17, 2012

    Schools need good leadership with clear structure and vision. Period. I don't care what kind of school it is. If your principal cannot clearly articulate "this is where we're headed" and also get a talented staff on board, your school will fail.
     
  12. blazer

    blazer Groupie

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    Nov 17, 2012

    My understanding (as a foreigner) is that your Charter schols have the option of sending any child that misbehaves back to the local public school. Is this correct? If it is then they should have good behaviour as they get rid of the miscreants and at the same time reduce the discipline in their rival schols!
     
  13. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Fanatic

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    Nov 17, 2012

    My understanding (as a foreigner) is that your Charter schols have the option of sending any child that misbehaves back to the local public school. Is this correct?

    This is not exactly correct. Rules for expelling students from charter schools are more complicated than that. Also, students can be expelled from public schools for major offenses, such as bringing a gun to school. It varies by district and charter school.
     
  14. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Habitué

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    Nov 18, 2012

    Struggling students, or any student, can typically leave a charter of their own volition. For example, the KIPP schools have a 40% attrition rate for Black students in the upper grades. This leaves only the most motivated and family-supported students in the school when testing starts. The KIPP schools have also received millions in donations from the Walton and Gates foundations in addition to the public money they get from tax payers.
     
  15. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Nov 18, 2012

    And public schools never get donated funds, right?
     
  16. EdEd

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    Nov 18, 2012

    Public schools can receive donated funds but most administrators do not try to engage in fundraising or public/private partnerships.
     
  17. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Habitué

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    Nov 18, 2012

    Our school has bake sales and gift wrap sales. We get donated money. Recently the Walton (Walmart) Foundation gave charter schools in Californian $17 million to support expansion.
     
  18. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Nov 19, 2012

    Great way to look at it! Definitely good to look at success stories and try to learn. As you look further into why their scores may be higher, do you know what curricula they use, what their professional development has been, etc.? In other words, I'm curious how you came to the conclusion that their schoolwide behavior management rules are the main cause of the difference?
     
  19. EdEd

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    Nov 19, 2012

    So, if it's about money, what are they spending that money on? What are they investing in that's making a difference in the quality of their education? What specifically have they purchased that other schools might be able to use?
     
  20. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Nov 19, 2012

    Our schools recently got $148 million in bond money that the public school board was able to put on the ballot. We also recently built a brand new stadium financed in large part by donations and I live/work in a poor area.

    I'm not denying that private support helps the charters survive and thrive - it does and it should. I do deny that this means they have more money than public schools. They still function with less and simply have the right priorities (you know, like not building $30 million stadiums).
     
  21. Accountable

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    Nov 19, 2012

    I'm always skeptical with any claim of a single solution. Does the parental involvement differ? Higher-income families sometimes have higher expectations for their children. Does the charter school offer some kind of training that the public school doesn't?

    I agree that the expectations & consequences would help, but I'm not sold that it's exactly the difference.
     

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