A.L .I.C.E. Training

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Loveslabs, Jan 2, 2014.

  1. Loveslabs

    Loveslabs Companion

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    My school system decided about three years ago to go with A.L.I.C.E. Training as a way to deal with armed intruders. We have been trained as a staff and are now starting to teach the children.

    I don't know what the best plan is for dealing with an intruder, but I feel at least A.L.I.C.E gives us something to work with instead of cowering in a corner and hoping for the best.

    I am very proud of my district for making a decision and sticking with it. My system is notorious for changing their minds. Also, I must say the training has been very traumatic/emotional for me because it really brings home the what if....There is no escaping reality when dealing with this topic, and my first thought is to stick my head in the sand and ignore it. Yes, I know that sounds immature, but it is how I feel.

    We have parents that are starting to complain that they feel the A.L.I.C.E plan is stupid and shouldn't be taught to any of the students. They just want their child to break a window and run down the street.

    I feel these types of comments show their ignorance ( I don't mean that in a mean way.) and perhaps their own fear. I know they need educated, and they are being educated.

    I guess my whole point is that I am angry they are so negative about the whole situation. Until this was brought to their attention they never said a word about the what if. They don't seem to trust the school system is trying to do what is best for their children. They don't seem to appreciate how traumatic the whole situation, or thought of the situation really happening, is to us as educators.

    I just really needed to vent. Thank you for listening.
     
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  3. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    We are in our first year of full ALICE implementation. We've only had one drill so far, and I was really proud of my kids. They took it seriously, and I was able to communicate with them quickly and efficiently. They listened to each other and continued to communicate as they made a plan to barricade the door (the "shooter" was right outside our classroom). After the event, we had a really useful discussion about how well our plan worked, what we could have done differently, etc. I was surprised how well it went.

    Isn't this part of ALICE, though? Our resource officer says that the beauty of the plan is that anything is possible. So if, in the given situation, you need to break a window and run down the street...do it. We've been taught how to safely break a window. And the kids know that once they're outside, they should just run away. Start knocking on doors. Run home/to a friend's house if you can. If it's safe, running is the best escape.

    Overall, like you, I do feel like ALICE gives us more options. What we really stress to the kids is...they're really the first line of defense. They're the ones on Facebook or Instagram, hearing or seeing potential threats of danger. If they see that and don't tell anyone, they are opening up their best friends, boyfriends/girlfriends, and themselves to harm. This really connected with my kids (8th graders), and we talk about the importance of reporting any suspicious activity frequently in my class.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Not really thrilled with the acronym... :p
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Our district doesn't do the ALICE program, but I wish they would, or at least something close. We still do the whole "sitting duck" thing, and I think it's a mistake.
     
  6. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    We are probably going to start ALICE within the next year. I took the training in college. It really is eye opening. I truly hope we go to it soon! I know some of our teachers will complain, but oh well.
     
  7. Loveslabs

    Loveslabs Companion

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    Yes, jumping out a window is one option, but not always the best option. We have two buildings with second floors, so children need many options. Plus, we are dealing with 1500 kindergarten to sixth grade students. If going out a door is faster than the window then the children need to know their options. I can't imagine hoisting 30 second graders out of a window quickly, so I think it would be very difficult for kindergarten teachers to do so with that age group.
    We do have a central meeting place for the children to run to. It is located where the busses can pick up the kids to relocate them to a local college. The busses can get to this meeting place without interfering with police and emergency vehicles. Once the children have been relocated to the campus parents can sign them out and take them home.
    I think what bothers me is that the parents don't realize busting out a window and running may not be the best option. I guess I would feel better if my child was being taught to stop, think, and then react. Plus, it just seems so discouraging to have parents constantly criticize our school system when we are trying our best to do the right thing.
     
  8. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Loveslabs, if your parents think that jumping out of a window is the best choice in ALL situations, maybe they need more information about the ALICE program? Has your school hosted any informational nights regarding the program?

    I just can't believe that parents would be advocating for their small children to jump out of windows, regardless of the circumstance. That's just....dumb. :sorry:
     
  9. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I teach high school on a second floor. I would have no issues leaving through a window if necessary. In my program, we were taught how to safely jump out a window by hanging on the ledge to lessen the height.

    Now I'm also right next to an exit down a short flight of stairs, so that would probably be our best option in many situations.
     
  10. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    I would have no where to go except out my classroom door. There is metal grating over my windows, so we are 'sitting ducks'. I would lock my door, hide my kids and pray for safety.
     
  11. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Same. We've told our kids that leaving through our second floor window may have to be our choice. However, I think older students (with more upper body strength and coordination) may be more suited for this than younger kids.
     
  12. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Definitely! That's why I made sure to state I teach high school. I'm sure there's a way to get little ones out the window, but I sure wouldn't want it to be my first choice!
     
  13. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Same for most of the 2nd and 3rd floor classrooms in my building. 4th floor would be risking death to jump, not sure what the procedure would be.

    My classroom is very unique we have a ledge we could get out onto and there are no bars on the window because I don't face the street. I would take my kids out there and also barricade the door, my file cabinet is next to it and could easily block the door.
     
  14. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I haven't received the training.

    But wouldn't barricading the doors also hamper any rescuers?
     
  15. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I suppose it could, Alice. In the training I received, we talked about how many shooters want ease of access. Therefore, if they find major obstruction, they're likely to move on compared to trying to move desks, bookshelves, etc... The response time is very quick in many areas so for us we literally only need to buy ourselves minutes before police can be in our building.

    Since my training was given by police, I'm assuming they're trained to handle barricades. I will be sure to ask though!
     
  16. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    OK, thanks. That's good to know.
     
  17. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    We've done lockdown drills, we each have something to cover our window on the door, we lock the door (from the outside :( I don't like that), check the hall for kids, and turn out the lights. Most of our kids get under their desk unless they face the door. Those kids have special places to get in the room. My instinct is to have all my kids together, with me in front of them, but supposedly, it's better to be spread out.
     
  18. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    This is basically our current procedure as well. What I don't like about it is that it doesn't address what happens if the intruder gets into (or starts in) the room.
     

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