a dyslexic sub identifies with students

Discussion in 'Secondary Education Archives' started by MrT, Nov 18, 2006.

  1. MrT

    MrT Rookie

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    Nov 18, 2006

    I have been subbing for a few weeks now, the other day I got the opportunity to sub as a special education teacher at the elementary. I have been wanting to sub special education for a while, I was diagnosed with dyslexia in 1988.

    Coming from a special needs background I immediately reconized what these kids were going through. As I was going through the lessons plans, watching these kids struggling to read, pay attention, and remeber verbal instructions, I felt like I was teaching myself; these kids were a reflection of how I was like sixteen years ago.

    The kids I had appeared only to have mild learning disabilites. As they were struggling with their reading I gave them pointers and told the kids what I would do to improve my reading. Since I have been teaching myself how to read better my whole life, I felt I had knack for teaching them to read better.

    One kid constantly would start reading the first few words from one sentence and then jump to the next sentence, skipping word. I told him "you know what? I use to have the same exact problem and this is how I corrected it." I then taught him to use his finger as a guide when he read and I noticed an improvement in his reading.

    All the kids I noticed learned words by sight rather than sounding out the words. Whenever the kids had trouble with words I would sound the word out for them. I knew them too well though. I could tell they were learning the words by remebering how they sound and not by sounding them out.

    Regretably, this is how I still read today. It is not that I don't know phonics, or how to sound out words, I just get disoriented and nervous whenever I come across a word I don't know and never can sound the word out. After four years of college my vocabulary is extensive, only once every few weeks I will stumble across a word I don't know.

    I still am unsure if teaching would be the right fit. I graduated with a degree in Computer Science and on the side I was taking classes toward a MBA. I enjoy programming and mathmatics, but I enjoy teaching even more.

    Teaching seems like a much more rewarding career. I am tempted to get my certificate as a math teacher for two reasons: I already had to take several calculus classes for my degree, and math teachers also are in high demand. Deep down inside my soul, I feel the need to teach special education. If I could get a certificate in both areas that would be even better, but that would take a lot of time.
     
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  3. MrT

    MrT Rookie

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    Nov 18, 2006

    oops I meant to put this in the special education forum, how did it end up here? I could of sworn I was in the right forum. Grrrr... oh well.
     
  4. h2omane

    h2omane Comrade

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    Nov 18, 2006

    Good for you!!!
     
  5. ms.k

    ms.k Rookie

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    Nov 19, 2006

    Mr. T, I read your post and had to reply. I teach in a mild/moderate resource classroom. Most of my students have great difficulty with reading. This problem then trickles over into every area of the curriculum making school hard for them.

    You sound like a great match for this job to me! A special education teacher has to have empathy and yet the ability to expect the best from the kids. A special education teacher also has to be extremely organized and able to keep up with lots of paper work. Maybe your left-brain strengths in math and analytical thinking will help you with that part of the job.

    Not to be too mushy...our minister told a story this morning about a boy who saved all of is money to buy a puppy. When he went to the pet store he picked the puppy with a bum leg. The boy also had a bum leg. The boy told the pet store owner that the puppy needed someone who would understand and could show him the way. This story absolutely made me think of my students.

    Special education is maddening because of the paper work and legalities. Not a day goes by though, that I don't love those kids!
    Think about it!
     
  6. lisap

    lisap Companion

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    Nov 23, 2006

    Having a math degree, experience with dyslexia and working with special ed kids is invaluable. You would be able to key in on the two most significant areas of learning disabilities - reading and math!

    I have a math degree and I can really explain things in multiple ways that help kids understand math. I also had difficulties reading - never diagnosed with anything - just never found reading interesting and didn't understand that words grouped together made whole thoughts. I just took them as individual words. I tell my students how I never read a whole book while in high school. The funny thing is that I figured out what reading was about when I took typing class and wanted to challenge myself to increase my speed. I realized that grouping words into thoughts was much faster than typing individual words. The other key to reading is to enjoy the content.

    Whatever your decision, you will have gained from the experience subbing. Good luck!
     

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