10th grade English semester plan

Discussion in 'High School' started by Furthuron, Dec 1, 2009.

  1. Furthuron

    Furthuron Companion

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    Dec 1, 2009

    Hi All,

    I'm in the credential program right now but not yet student teaching. My English Methods prof wants us to do a semester outline but seeing as I have yet to be in a classroom, I don't even know where to start.

    Can someone help me with what units are typically taught in 10th grade for English? I can look up the lesson plans easily, but I don't know what kind of plans to look up! :eek:

    Thanks! :)
     
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  3. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Fanatic

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    Dec 1, 2009

    Search the state curriculum for your state. I could tell you for Louisiana, but that won't help.
     
  4. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Dec 1, 2009

    When I taught 10th in my district, I taught a unit on short stories, the play Antigone, the novels Lord of the Flies and Bless Me, Ultima, and a controversial topic research paper. Those are the big pieces - of course, there was grammar and vocabulary and lots of other stuff mixed in.
     
  5. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Start with your state standards (reading and writing).
    Then, choose 10th grade appropriate materials (Mrs. K gave you several). Along with what Mrs. K listed, our 10th grade also does To Kill a Mockingbird. Our 10th graders write research papers and persuasive essays.

    I wonder if you can do a google search for a 10th grade lit book and then see a sample table of contents. That would give you more short story authors and poets typical for 10th grade (I'll try to find something after I type this post).

    Then, once you have your standards and materials, you can build lessons around them for reading and writing. (Our state also has speaking and listening standards built into the language arts curriculum).

    Off to see if I can find a source for you, I'll post back in a minute.
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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  7. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Hmm...my quick search didn't reveal any sample table of contents. However, I did remember our 10th grade also does Julius Caesar

    Aw, good find, Alice!:)
     
  8. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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  9. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Oh, I forgot the Shakespeare - when I taught 10th I did A Midsummer Night's Dream, which is an option for us instead of Julius Caesar, but this year my school moved Macbeth to 10th.
     
  10. Ms.H

    Ms.H Companion

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    I think a lot of 10th grades do world literature. I have, so far, done a Ancient Greek & Roman unit (excerpts from Homer, Vergil, Ovid), Antigone (Greek theatre), Lit. of the Middle Ages (excerpts from Song of Roland, Dante's Inferno) and Renaissance literature (Selection from Moore's Utopia, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar and Don Quixote). That will probably get me a little past the semester mark.
     
  11. Furthuron

    Furthuron Companion

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    Dec 3, 2009

    Thanks so much for all of your responses!

    I'm in California and I printed out a list of the 9th/10th standards. Now I just have to figure out how to come up with lessons that connect to all of them. This is one of those times I wonder if I'm in over my head....
     
  12. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Google for lesson plans using one or two specific keywords from the standards or from particular works - it's amazing what you can unearth that way.

    Try here: http://thwt.org/writingandlit.htm

    You should also have a look at (though you probably don't want to print) the Frameworks doc for English/language arts on the CDE Web site.
     
  13. ILikeEnglish

    ILikeEnglish Rookie

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    Jan 17, 2010

    Short Stories

    Hi Mrs. K,
    Would you please tell me what short stories you included in your unit. Also, we will soon be starting Antigone. If you could share any of your approaches/successes, I sure would appreciate it. I have not taught this before. (I am also teaching 10th grade, but at an all-girl school).
    Thank you!!
     
  14. Mr. A

    Mr. A Rookie

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    Jan 17, 2010

    You are NOT "in over your head."

    Kids need to know
    ---how words work
    ---how sentences work
    ---how paragraphs work
    ---how essays, novels, stories, and poems work

    The standards look overwhelming, but all you have to do is think of them like this:

    1. Reading
    2. Writing
    3. Vocabulary
    4. Speaking

    For what it's worth, I will tell you what I think you need to cover over the course of a semester:

    READING

    Here's what they need to read:

    1. Two or three short, time-tested novels.
    2. Several short stories.
    3. Several poems (some older, some newer; some longer, some shorter; some lyric, some narrative).
    4. Some literary criticism (but not until AFTER reading tests, essays, etc. are over).
    5. Two or three short works of nonfiction.

    Here's what they need to know about reading:

    1. The difference between connotation and denotation.
    2. The difference between literal and figurative language.
    3. Five to ten types of figurative language (metaphor, imagery, etc.).
    4. Five to ten poetic devices. (They might overlap with #3.)
    5. The difference between narrative and lyric poetry.
    6. They need to be able to identify in basic terms ethos, logos, and pathos-driven arguments.
    7. They should know in general terms the basic, generic plot chart (exposition, conflict, resolution, etc.) What happens at the beginning, middle, and end of a story and why?
    8. They need to identify themes in works of fiction.


    WRITING

    Here's what effective writers know:

    1. The parts of speech. (Kids will say they know them, but they really don't.) They need to know what kinds of words perform what functions, and they need to be able to show evidence of this knowledge in their writing.
    2. The suffixes that denote the different parts of speech (-ion, etc.)
    3. The difference between a phrase and a clause.
    4. The basic sentence patterns (simple, compound, complex, compound/complex)
    5. The fifteen or twenty most common errors in spelling, punctuation, and usage and how to fix them.
    6. A (as opposed to the) basic framework for an essay (introduction, thesis statement, body, topic sentence, evidence, analysis, conclusion).
    7. How to write essays of the following types: personal, response to nonfiction, response to fiction, argumentative


    VOCABULARY

    1. Please don't assign SAT-vocab lists unless you're dealing with gifted kids and even then I'm not so sure.
    2. Please don't assign vocab lists at all (at least lists with arcane words like "ignoble"). They've been proven to fail.
    3. Don't let the dictionary drive any study of vocab. There's almost always at least one word in the definition that kids don't know. Plus, when they use dictionaries, kids almost always misuse the words because they don't understand their proper context.
    4. Stay away from thesauruses. ("Thesauri"? Have I misspelled both words?)
    5. They need to know what cliches are and how to avoid/repair them.
    6. They need to know some of the most commonly misused words and how not to use them improperly. (Can't think of any example right now except for "infer" and "imply," but there are many others.)

    It's more important that kids know what words NOT to use. They already know lots of great words. They just don't use them. Force them to use what they already know. Other words---the "big" words---can be taught in context.

    SPEAKING

    1. I wouldn't do a speech unit.
    2. Kids talk when they work in groups.
    3. Kids talk all the time.
    4. Kids can get practice when they present academic material in groups in front of the class.

    Hopefully I haven't left much out. If I have, I'm sure someone will add it here.

    You will excel if you keep your eye on the ball (pardon the cliche) and keep your teaching priorities straight.

    Ask yourself, "What would a parent say if he were observing this class?"

    I'd wish you good luck, but you're not gonna need it!
     
  15. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Jan 17, 2010

    Short stories, hmm, let me think..."Contents of a Dead Man's Pockets," was one that I liked..."By the Waters of Babylon" and "There Will Come Soft Rains" are both sort of post-apocalyptic stories..."A Visit to Grandmother" and "Civil Peace" and both good for character. Those were all in our Prentice Hall 10th grade book.

    As far as Antigone goes, I remember that I did a mask project and used parts of a very good video called Greek Drama: Ritual to Theater. If you can't find that exact program (I found it online, but it's $150!) I noticed some youtube videos on the roots of Greek theater.

    Here's a link to a discussion on teaching the play on the English Companion Ning. If you're not a member yet, you should be! http://englishcompanion.ning.com/group/teachingmythology/forum/topics/teaching-antigone-1?commentId=2567740%3AComment%3A170712&xg_source=activity&groupId=2567740%3AGroup%3A86023
     
  16. Chrissteeena

    Chrissteeena Companion

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    Jan 17, 2010

    I'm thinking back to 10th grade... I remember reading:

    The Scarlet Letter (but that may have been 11th grade)
    To Kill A Mockingbird
    Night byElie Wiesel
    "Lamb to the slaughter" by Roald Dah (short story)
    That's all I can honestly remember right now

    This is the description of English 10R (R is for regents) at the HS I went to (New York)

    The scope of the curriculum is the following: concentration on writing in connection with the literature text prescribed for the 10th year as well as literature outside of the classroom; exposure to short stories, drama, poetry, and non‑fiction through the use of an anthology of literature; and continued emphasis on word skills. Many writing assignments during the year will be modeled after the four writing tasks required by the English Language Arts assessment. All students write a research paper. During the 10th year, special emphasis is given to speaking and listening skills, the application and use of rhetorical devices, and the creation and delivery of speeches.
     
  17. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Jan 17, 2010

    Our 10th grade list:
    -Macbeth
    -Night
    -Pride and Prejudice
    -The Great Gatsby
    -Catcher in the Rye
    -Lord of the Flies
    -The Inferno
    -One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest
     
  18. Mr. A

    Mr. A Rookie

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    Jan 17, 2010

    Is that list for AP students?

     
  19. Chrissteeena

    Chrissteeena Companion

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    Jan 17, 2010

    I love how every school is different :D I never read Macbeth, Pride and Prejudice, or The Inferno. The Great Gatsby, Catcher in the Rye and One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest I read in 11th grade and Lord of the Flies is read in 9th grade I believe (though each teacher has an option) and I was forced to switch classes and they had just finished reading it in my new English class.
     
  20. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Jan 17, 2010

    The honors selections are Pride and Prejudice and The Inferno. The rest everyone reads, including our low level kids.
     
  21. ILikeEnglish

    ILikeEnglish Rookie

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    Jan 26, 2010

    Thanks, Mrs. K!
     

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